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6 TV Shows Your Child Should Be Watching

6 TV Shows Your Child Should Be Watching

Pediatricians recommend that kids spend most of their time being active outdoors and playing with their peers. However, that doesn’t mean TV has to be taken out of the picture. There are several educational TV shows that help your children learn before and after they enter school. Take a look at these six TV shows that your kids should watch.

1. Sesame Street

As one of the longest-airing children’s shows on TV, Sesame Street is still a favorite among parents. It teaches kids about sharing, being a good friend, and other important values. Additionally, words and letters are introduced through fun scenes and songs with favorite characters like Elmo, Big Bird, Zoey, and Cookie Monster. The show even has guest appearances from famous people for a real-world charm.

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You probably enjoyed watching this show as a kid, and your children can too. Sesame Street has aired on PBS (and other networks) since 1969. Plus, most TV packages include this channel, so you don’t have to pay a lot of money to entertain and educate your kids.

2. Super Why!

What kid doesn’t like a superhero? Well, Super Why has four of them: Alpha Pig with Alphabet Power; Princess Presto with Spelling Power; Wonder Red with Word Power; and Super Why with the Power to Read. This TV show teaches kids how to put letters together to make words and how to sound out words when reading. It’s great for kids from preschool to second grade. Plus, several companies have given the show high ratings for education and entertainment, such as Common Sense Media. Super Why! has aired on PBS and PBS Kids Sprout since 2008.

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3. Dora the Explorer

This interactive cartoon for preschoolers teaches kids about colors, shapes, numbers, and more. Kids are enlisted to help Dora, a Latina heroine, solve problems and go on adventures while singing songs and having fun. Common Spanish words and phrases are also incorporated into the show to give children a jumpstart on learning a second language. It helps kids interact with children of diverse backgrounds when they get to school. Nickelodeon has been featuring Dora the Explorer since 2000, and the TV show Go, Diego, Go! stemmed from its success.

4. Thomas and Friends

Based on the Railway Series books by Reverend Wilbery Awdry, Thomas and Friends follows the story of locomotive friends who live on Sodor Island. There are large engines and small engines, and the story examines the differences and focuses on the strengths of each individual. It teaches kids to accept others for who they are and always do their best in everything. After all, the catch phrase of the show is “I think I can.” Thomas and Friends has aired since 1984. However, the show was totally redone in 2003 by ITV.

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5. Imagination Movers

Imagination Movers is a live-action series about a New Orleans band that likes to solve problems. Rich, Dave, Scott, and “Smitty” hang out in the “Idea Warehouse,” where they solve emergencies and make music together. This children’s show is fun to watch because the upbeat music keeps kids listening while teaching them how to think things through. After watching the show, kids should be able to tackle any problem that comes their way. Imagination Movers has aired on Disney since 2003.

6. Arthur

Based on a classic children’s book series by Marc Brown, Arthur is about an 8-year-old boy from Elwood City. He has to deal with several circumstances that many children face today. For instance, the show explores several health-related and social issues, such as cancer, dyslexia, and other disabilities. The stories, along with the theme song “Believe in Yourself,” teach kids how to deal with these problems and accept everyone. Arthur has aired on PBS since 1996.

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TV is full of things that your children shouldn’t see, which is why you should carefully select the programs that they’re allowed to view. The TV shows mentioned here are some of the best because of their educational value. What other children’s TV shows would you recommend to parents? Leave a comment below.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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