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5 Urban Health Legends You Should Disregard

5 Urban Health Legends You Should Disregard

Medical specialists spend years studying the human physiology, so it’s not surprising that the lay person is bound to have some misconceptions about what is and isn’t good for the body. In fact, thanks to the Internet, urban health legends now abound. But you’ll just want to walk away the next time you hear one of these five bogus health myths.

Diet Soda is Healthy For You

Zero calories means zero problems, right? Nope. “Fundamentally, we have no convincing evidence that diet soda or artificial sweeteners are actually helpful for people trying to lose weight,” said Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. In fact, a group of French scientists showed that the artificial sweeteners like aspartame, commonly used to “sweeten” diet soda, can cause a body’s insulin production and resistance to go haywire. Coupling that with a confused metabolism that craves the energy these false sweeteners imitate makes a person more likely to develop type II diabetes, the research showed.

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Vaccines Cause Autism

Former surgeon and medical research Andrew Wakefield published a report in The Lancet linking the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine to the development of autism spectrum disorders in young children. The media later revealed Wakefield had ulterior motives that led the medical community to eventually discredit him and his entire study a few years later.

To date, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stress that no reliable studies have shown a connection between vaccines and autism. However, many parents continue to under-vaccinate their children out of fear — a harmful choice that has led to dire outbreaks in the past.

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Watching TV Leads to Poor Eyesight

Your parents have probably told you to not sit so close to the TV out of fear you’d go blind. Chances are their parents told them the same thing, and for good reason — many TVs sold up to the late 1960s emitted radiation levels 100,000 times greater than what the federal government considered safe.

However, doctors have since refuted the notion that watching TV at any distance will directly lead to eye damage and say there is no connection between TV and poor eyesight. That being said, a sedentary lifestyle that revolves around watching TV for hours on end is bad for you anyway and can lead to health problems with every part of your body.

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Step away from the boob tube once in a while and use your eyes to focus on more pleasant things like trees, people, kittens, and the rest of your proximal physical reality you’ve chosen to ignore for so long.

Cracking Bones Leads to Arthritis

A well-executed cracking of the joints might make everyone in your general vicinity squirm with discomfort, but that’s about the closest you’re going to get to a legitimate health problem. The sound of a joint cracking isn’t caused by a physical breaking of any kind. Rather, the space between joints is filled with fluids and nutrients that naturally release a small amount of gaseous byproduct.

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When you apply pressure in a certain way, you can create a vacuum bubble that bursts and creates that familiar cringe-worthy sound. Despite the perceived repulsion, doctors say there is no link to joint cracking and the development of arthritis. However, those same doctors warn that habitual knuckle-crackers have a higher risk of damaging ligaments or dislocating tendons, so make sure you crack sparingly.

You Should Suck Venom Out of a Snake Bite

An old hiking wives’ tale once told snake bite victims to cut open their bite wound and physically suck the venom out before it can spread through the body. Don’t do this. Bacteria from your mouth could only exacerbate the problem and more blood loss doesn’t help anyone here. Rather, stay calm, keep the wound below the heart, and seek immediate medical attention.

Our understanding of health and physiology changes every day. Always be sure to take advice passed down from decades past with a grain of salt. What other urban health legends have you heard? Do you tell others to disregard them? Let us know in the comments.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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