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I Didn’t Expect Halloween Recipes To Be Both Delicious And Healthy Until I See This

I Didn’t Expect Halloween Recipes To Be Both Delicious And Healthy Until I See This

It’s not often you find the words “Halloween” and “healthy” in the same sentence. After all, Halloween is known for one thing: sweet treats.

If you have kids, you know that Halloween means your house will be filled with tempting sweet treats for the foreseeable future. But let’s put this into perspective for a moment. Let’s say your child visits 30 houses on Halloween (many kids are much more aggressive) and picks up a “fun-sized” candy bar at each house. Assuming each of those fun-sized candy bars has 250 calories (I’m using Snickers as the basis for this assumption), your kid would be bringing home 7,500 calories worth of candy. Even if it takes a full week to finish up that candy, you’re looking at an extra 1,000+ calories each day of sugary, calorie-dense junk food!

But Halloween doesn’t have to be a sugar-filled, unhealthy affair. By using a little imagination and some healthy ingredients, you can prepare some better-for-you snacks, meals, and desserts.

If you’re looking for healthier recipes this Halloween season, you’ve come to the right place. Check out this list of some of our favorite healthy Halloween recipes that are great for adults and kids alike.

“Hummus Hands”

hummus-hand
    Ingredients:
    • 1 can salt-free garbanzo beans
    • 2 Tbsp olive oil
    • 2 Tbsp tahini
    • 1 tsp. kosher salt
    • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
    • 1 clove of garlic
    • 5 carrots
    • 5 pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
    Directions:

    1. Rinse and peel carrots so they resemble five fingers.

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    2. Rinse beans and combine with olive oil, tahini, salt, lemon juice, and garlic in a food processor. Turn to medium-high setting and blend until smooth.

    3. Place a small dollop of hummus on each of the pumpkin seeds and press onto the ends of the carrots so they resemble fingers.

    4. Transfer hummus to a deep serving bowl and stick the carrots into the bowl so it looks like a hand is reaching out of it.

    Nutrition Facts per serving (makes 5 servings):

    205 calories, 9 g fat, 23 g carbs (6 g fiber), 7 g protein

    “Orange Pumpkin Milkshake”

    pumpkin milkshake
      Ingredients:
      • 1 cup canned pumpkin
      • 1 banana
      • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt
      • 1 Tbsp honey
      • 1 Tbsp nutmeg
      • 1 Tbsp cinnamon
      • 1 Tbsp brown sugar
      • 3 cups vanilla unsweetened almond milk
      • 2 cups ice
      Directions:

      1. Combine all ingredients in a blender except for brown sugar.

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      2. Blend on highest setting for 30 seconds.

      3. Divide evenly into two glasses and top each with brown sugar.

      Nutrition Facts per serving (makes 4 servings):

      135 calories, 2.5 g fat, 25 g carbs, 4.5 g protein

      “Ants on a Log”

      ants on a log
        Ingredients:
        • 4 large stalks of celery
        • 4 Tbsp peanut butter
        • 1/4 cup raisins
        Directions:

        1. Rinse celery and chop ends off.

        2. Coat the inside of each stalk of celery with peanut butter.

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        3. Line the inside of each stalk with raisins by pressing a raisin into the layer of peanut butter.

        Nutrition Facts per serving (makes 4 servings):

        130 calories, 8 g fat, 12 g carbs, 4 g protein

        “Deviled Egg Eyeballs”

        deviled egg eyeballs
          Ingredients:
          • 5 eggs
          • 3 green olives
          • 2 Tbsp mayo with olive oil
          • 2 Tbsp Greek yogurt
          • 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
          • 1 beet (peeled and diced)
          • 1/2 tsp. salt
          • 1/2 tsp. black pepper
          Directions:

          1. Bring a pot of water to a boil.

          2. Drop eggs in and boil for 7 minutes.

          3. Remove eggs from boiling water and rest in a bowl of cool water. Add sliced beets to the water.

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          4. Remove shells from each egg and cut each in half.

          5. Remove the yolk from each egg and combine in mixing bowl with mayo, mustard, yogurt, and salt.

          6. Scoop the yolk mixture back into each half an egg then top with a thin slice of olive.

          Nutrition Facts per serving (makes 5 servings):

          103 calories, 6 g fat, 1 g carbs, 7 g protein

          “Healthier Peanut Butter Cups”

          peanut butter cup
            Ingredients:
            • 4 Tbsp coconut oil
            • 1/2 cup peanut butter
            • 2 tsp. vanilla extract
            • 1/4 cup raw organic cocoa powder
            • 8-10 drops of liquid stevia
            • 1/4 cup crushed peanuts
            Directions:

            1. Line a mini muffin tray with 12 liners. Combine 2 Tbsp melted coconut oil, 2 Tbsp peanut butter, 1 tsp. vanilla in a separate mixing bowl. Pour mixture in bottom half of each liner. Put muffin tray in freezer for 10-15 minutes.

            2. Combine other 2 Tbsp melted coconut oil, 1/4 cup peanut butter, 1 tsp. vanilla, cocoa powder, and stevia in a mixing bowl. Fill top layer of each liner and top with crushed nuts. Refrigerate another 10-15 minutes.

            Nutrition Facts per serving (makes 12 servings):

            107 calories, 3 g fat, 2 g carbs, 3 g protein

            More by this author

            Scott Christ

            Scott Christ is a writer, entrepreneur, and founder of Pure Food Company.

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            Last Updated on November 15, 2019

            10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

            10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

            Bad habits expose us to suffering that is entirely avoidable. Unfortunately, these bad habits are difficult to break because they are 100% dependent on our mental and emotional state.

            Anything we do that can prove harmful to us is a bad habit – drinking, drugs, smoking, procrastination, poor communication are all examples of bad habits. These habits have negative effects on our physical, mental and emotional health.

            Humans are hardwired to respond to stimuli and to expect a consequence of any action. This is how habits are acquired: the brain expects to be rewarded a certain way under certain circumstances. How you initially responded to certain stimuli is how your brain will always remind you to behave when the same stimuli are experienced.

            If you visited the bar close to your office with colleagues every Friday, your brain will learn to send you a signal to stop there even when you are alone and eventually not just on Fridays. It will expect the reward of a drink after work every day, which can potentially lead to a drinking problem.

            Kicking negative behavior patterns and steering clear of them requires a lot of willpower and there are many reasons why breaking bad habits is so difficult.

            1. Lack of Awareness or Acceptance

            Breaking a bad habit is not possible if the person who has it is not aware that it is a bad one.

            Many people will not realize that their communication skills are poor or that their procrastination is affecting them negatively, or even that the drink they had as a nightcap has now increased to three.

            Awareness brings acceptance. Unless a person realizes on their own that a habit is bad, or someone manages to convince them of the same, there is very little chance of the habit being kicked.

            2. No Motivation

            Going through a divorce, not being able to cope with academics and falling into debt are instances that can bring a profound sense of failure with them. A person going through these times can fall into a cycle of negative thinking where the world is against them and nothing they can do will ever help, so they stop trying altogether.

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            This give-up attitude is a bad habit that just keeps coming around. Being in debt could make you feel like you are failing at maintaining your home, family and life in general.

            If you are looking to get out of a rut and feel motivated, take a look at this article: Why Is Internal Motivation So Powerful (And How to Find It)

            3. Underlying Psychological Conditions

            Psychological conditions such as depression and ADD can make it difficult to break bad habits.

            A depressed person may find it difficult to summon the energy to cook a healthy meal, resulting in food being ordered in or consumption of packaged foods. This could lead to eventually become a habit that adversely affects health and is difficult to overcome.

            A person with ADD may start to clean their house but get distracted soon after, leaving the task incomplete, eventually leading to a state where it is acceptable to live in a house that is untidy and dirty.

            The fear of missing out (FOMO) is very real to some people. Obsessively checking their social media and news sources, they may believe that not knowing of something as soon as it is published can be catastrophic to their social standing.

            4. Bad Habits Make Us Feel Good

            One of the reasons it is difficult to break habits is that a lot of them make us feel good.[1]

            We’ve all been there – the craving for a tub of ice cream after a breakup or a casual drag on a joint, never to be repeated until we miss how good it made us feel. We succumb to the craving for the pleasure felt while indulging in it, cementing it as a habit even while we are aware it isn’t good for us.

            Over-eating is a very common bad habit. Just another pack of crisps, a couple of candies, a large soda… none of these are needed by us. We want them because they give us comfort. They’re familiar, they taste good and we don’t even notice when we progress from just one extra slice of pizza to four.

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            You can read this article to learn more: We Do What We Know Is Bad for Us, Why?

            5. Upward Comparisons

            Comparisons are a bad habit that many of us have been exposed to since we were children. Parents might have compared us to siblings, teachers may have compared us to classmates, and bosses could compare us to past and present employees.

            The people who have developed the bad habit of comparing themselves to others have been given incorrect yardsticks for measurement from the start.

            These people will always find it difficult to break out of this bad habit because there will always be someone who has it better than they do: a better house, better car, better job, higher income and so on.

            6. No Alternative

            This is a real and valid reason why bad habits are hard to break. These habits could fulfill a need that may not be met any other way.

            Someone who has physical or psychological limitations such as a disability or social anxiety may find it hard to quit obsessive content consumption for better habits.

            Alternately, a perfectly healthy person may be unable to quit smoking because alternates are just not working out.

            Similarly, a person who bites their nails when anxious may be unable to relieve stress in any other socially accepted manner.

            7. Stress

            As mentioned above, anything that stresses us out can lead to adopting and cementing bad habits.

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            When a person is stressed about something, it is easy to give in to a bad habit because the mental resources required to fight them are not available.

            Stress plays such a huge role in this that we commonly find a person who had previously managed to kick a bad habit fall back into the old ways because they felt their stress couldn’t be managed any other way.

            8. Sense of Failure

            People looking to kick bad habits may feel a strong sense of failure because it’s just that difficult.

            Dropping a bad habit usually means changes in lifestyle that people may be unwilling to make, or these changes might not be easy to make in spite of the will to make them.

            Over-eaters need to empty their house of unhealthy food, resist the urge to order in and not pick up their standard grocery items from the store.

            Those who drink too much need to avoid the bars or even people who drink often.

            If such people slip even once with a glass of wine or a smoke or a bag of chips, they tend to be excessively harsh on themselves and feel like failures.

            9. The Need to Be All-New

            People who are looking to break bad habits feel they need to re-create themselves in order to break themselves of their bad habits, while the truth is the complete opposite.

            These people actually need to go back to who they were before they developed the bad habit.

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            10. Force of Habit

            Humans are creatures of habit and having familiar, comforting outcomes for daily triggers helps us maintain a sense of balance in our lives.

            Consider people who are used to lighting up a cigarette every time they talk on the phone or munching on crisps when watching TV. They will always associate a phone call with a puff on the cigarette and screen time with eating.

            These habits, though bad, are a source of comfort to them as is meeting with those people they indulge in these bad habits with.

            Final Thoughts

            These are the main reasons why bad habits may be difficult to break but it is important to remember that the task is not impossible.

            Do you have bad habits you want to kick? My article How to Break a Bad Habit (and Replace It With a Good One) gives you tips on well, how to kick bad habits while my other article How Long Does It Take to Break a Habit? Science Will Tell You gives realistic information on what to expect while you’re trying to quit them.

            There are many compassionate, positive and self-loving techniques to kick bad habits. The internet is rich in information regarding bad habits, their effects and how to overcome them, while professional help is always available for those who feel they need it.

            Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

            Reference

            [1] After Skool: Why Do Bad Habits Feel SO GOOD?

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