Advertising
Advertising

4 Tips for Great Holiday Letters

4 Tips for Great Holiday Letters

Holiday letters are a great addition to your Christmas Card, as they allow us to connect with our card recipients on a deeper level. Many who receive your holiday letters may not have seen you all year long and will love to have the chance to “catch up” with you via the format of a Christmas letter .

It’s just about time to send out your Christmas cards to ensure that they arrive before Christmas Day, so follow these simple tips for creating a great holiday letter this year.

Advertising

Be Yourself

How do you “be yourself” in a holiday letter? Actually, the point is to write the letter the way you would talk to a friend or family member. Using your own voice in the letter makes it more fun for you to write, and more fun for others to read.

Tell A Few Stories

We all relate best to stories, as they’re easy to remember and we can form a picture of the events in our minds. Rather than listing the year’s activities or accomplishments in your holiday letters, tell a few stories that illustrate them—a great story will ensure that the recipient of your letter will be sharing it with others soon.

Advertising

Keep It Short

Holiday letters should be one page long, and it’s best to keep them single-sided as well. A lot happens in a year and it may seem difficult to keep the letter short, but consider your audience—they just want the highlights. You can include a couple of pictures as well, but don’t go overboard with those either.

Feel free to start with a draft. This is where the computer makes writing holiday letters so easy: start by writing down a few ideas, then go back and fill them in with more detail. It doesn’t hurt to just start writing, and if the Christmas letter ends up being too long you can just trim it down to the best parts. A letter that is short and sweet will be appreciated and enjoyed by all.

Advertising

Give Details When Necessary

The recipient list of your Christmas letter may be comprised of friends, family and even people who don’t know you well (your spouse’s relatives or friends perhaps). Don’t leave anyone in the dark by not providing enough information.

When mentioning your kids, include their ages in parenthesis the first time you mention them.  When referring to a relative or friend, give their full name and/or their name with an explanation of how you know them. For example if you have a great story about a neighbor, refer to them as your neighbor in the story.

Advertising

It’s great to tell a story about your vacation but be sure to give all the relevant details: where you went, what time of year it was, and who were you with. It’s not necessary to go into every detail, but make sure that the story will be clear to someone who has never heard about your trip.

Try to mail your letters by mid-December to ensure they arrive on time. Many people travel for the holidays, so if you put your holiday letters off until the last minute, many won’t receive it until after they return from their vacation.

Featured photo credit:  Little girl writes letter to Santa via Shutterstock

More by this author

50 Simple Questions to Ask to Get to Know Someone Deeply Best Ways To Spend Your Thanksgiving Weekend This Year How to Create a Secure Password That You’ll Always Remember 20 Brilliant Self-Help Books You Need To Read How To Select Reading And Entertainment That Enriches Your Life

Trending in Lifestyle

1 How to Help Nausea Go Away Fast with These 5 Fixes 2 5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With 3 What Is FOMO (And How to Get Over It) 4 9 Practical Ways to Achieve Work Life Balance in a Busy World 5 How to Get out of a Funk and Take Control of Life

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

Advertising

1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

Advertising

2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

Advertising

4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

Advertising

Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next