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21 Things You Are Doing Wrong Every Day

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21 Things You Are Doing Wrong Every Day

There are things which you’re doing every day and you’ve already made those as habits that they seem totally normal the way you’re doing them. But no, if you know how to do stuff the right way instead of your habitual way, your life will change!

1. Folding Your Shirt

It takes you very long to fold the shirts? Learn this and you can do it in 2 seconds.

2. Closing an Unfinished Pack of Chips

Can’t find a clip to seal an unfinished pack of chips? Do the origami to your chip bag.

close chip bag

    3. Doing Your Girl’s Hair

    You hate it when your daughter’s hair’s always sticking out even after being brushed for thousands of times, right? Have you ever tried to use a vacuum and hair elastic instead?

    4. Eating Tic Tac

    Do you just pour out the candies on your palm or into your mouth? How about this?

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    eat tic tac

      5. Eating cupcakes

      The right way of eating cupcakes helps you eat like a lady or gentleman. (Pay attention at 0:29!)

      6. Eating Snacks

      Always want to get the snacks from the bag easier? You should do this:

      snack bowl

        7. Opening Plastic Clamshell Packages

        Do you use your hands to try to tear apart the clamshell package of a product? Or do you use scissors to help you? Next time you can try with a can opener.

        8. Eating with Chinese Take-out Container

        Have you thought about using it as a plate instead?

        chinese take out

          9. Cooking a Round-Egg

          It does take a bit of effort to cook a perfectly round-egg, but with a little help of a slice of onion, everything’s changed.

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          cook round egg

            10. Eating Ketchup with the Little Paper Cups

            Have you ever thought of making full use of the paper cups’ tiny little feature? (Check out how it works at 0:10!)

            11. Freezing Your Drink Quickly

            Thought putting your drink solely in the freezer’s the only option? Nope! Put a wet kitchen roll around the drink and then put it in the freezer will make the drink cold enough in 15 minutes!

              12. Crushing a Can

              How do you crush a can? Step on it or smash it on your head? There’s a smarter way to do this. (Check it out at 1:28!)

              13. Making an Ice-cream Dessert

              Digging out the ice-cream from the box is not easy, let alone making dessert with it. What about this?

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              ice cream dessert

                14. Peeling a Potato

                All you need are 1 bowl of hot water and 1 bowl of cold water to peel the potato skin. (The trick starts at 0:20!)

                15. Cutting Cherry Tomatoes

                You probably cut cherry tomatoes into half one by one, but if you put the cherry tomatoes between 2 plastic lids you can do it quicker.

                Food52

                  16. Making a BLT

                  Thought spreading the slices of bacon all over the sandwich will do? Think again! Weave the bacon slices together so that they don’t slip and slide.

                  bacon-weave

                    17. Peeling an Egg

                    Peeling an egg bit by bit with those tiny pieces is frustrating….but what? Just a blow on the egg will do?

                    18. Drinking with a Straw

                    Drink with the straw skillfully like this so the straw’s position is fixed.

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                    fix the straw position

                      19. Applying Nail Polish

                      Randomly polishing your nail doesn’t make your nails look prettier. Try this:

                      Apply Nail Polish

                        20. Breaking in New Shoes

                        You simply hope that the more you wear the new pair of shoes, the more you can break in them? Try a quicker method!

                        break in shoes

                          Put on a thick pair of socks and then put your shoes on. Use a hairdryer to aim at your shoes and make the tight spots as the focus while wiggling your toes around. Don’t remove your shoes immediately but wait them to cool down. Repeat the whole process until you feel that the shoes’ stretched out. Then you can remove the socks and dah-dah, the shoes fit you more now!

                          21. Peeling a Banana

                          Check out the money way to peel a banana in 1 second. (Find out the trick at 0:47!)

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                          Anna Chui

                          Anna is the Editor-in-Chief and Content Strategist of Lifehack. She's also a communication expert and shares tips on happiness and relationships.

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                          Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                          5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                          5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                          Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                          “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                          Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                          Food is a universal necessity.

                          It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                          Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                          Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                          Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                          Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                          The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                          Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                          This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                          Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                          Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                          Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                          So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                          Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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