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20 Inspirational And Fun Board And Card Games To Play With Kids

20 Inspirational And Fun Board And Card Games To Play With Kids

Board and card games for kids makes for great family fun time. The type of game can teach logic, strategy, turn-taking, and fairness to kids.

1. Rat-A-Tat-Tat Cat: Power Of Mathematics

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    Ages: 6+

    Number Of Players: 2-6

    The object of  Rat-A-Tat-Tat Cat is to have as few rats as possible in your hand at the end of the game. The game also sharpens memory and requires children to learn strategy as well. The round ends when a player thinks they have the lowest possible score, he or she then raps on the table saying rat-a-tat-tat.

     2. Take The Cake: Power Of Shapes

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      Ages: 4+

      Number Of Players: 2-4

      Take the cake is all about taking the cake! The cupcake, that is. Each player matches wooden shapes to their card cupcakes. The player with the most correctly decorated cupcakes wins. The game teaches turn-taking and helps with fine motor skills.

      3. There’s A Moose In The House: Power Of Strategy

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        Ages: 8+

        Number Of Players: 2-5

        Moose in the house is a card game of strategy. The object of the game is to have as few or no moose at the end of play.

         4. Scrabble: Power Of Words

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          Ages: 8+

          Number of Players: 2 to 4

          Scrabble lets kids get creative in their use of words and word play. Parents and kids take turns building or creating words with their letter tiles. Have a doubt about whether a word is a word? Google it to determine if it’s real or not.

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          5. Go Fish: Power Of Matching

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            Ages: 7+

            Number of Players: 2+

            Cards: Standard Deck

            Go Fish players are dealt seven cards when there are only two players and five when there are more. Kids match suits or the same numbers. As cards are matched they are placed face up on the table. Players ask for a particular suit or number by asking other players or by being told to ‘go fish’ in the ‘fish pond’ of the left over deck..

            6. Clue: Power Of Mystery

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              Ages: 8+

              Number Of Players: 2-6

              Clue induces kids to learn the power of deduction by finding the guilty party, weapon, and where the murder took place.

              7. Old Maid: Power Of Strategy

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                Ages: 5+

                Number Of Players: 3+

                Cards: Standard deck with one queen removed

                The dealer in Old Maid deals all of the cards at once. The players make the initial matches and continue to do so until the remaining card, the old maid is left. Whoever is left holding the old maid loses. Kids learn to match and the way to giving away the unwanted cards.

                8. Chinese Checkers: Power Of Planning Ahead

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                  Ages: 5+

                  Number Of Players: 2-6

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                  The objective of Chinese checkers is to be the first to reach the “home” of one’s opponents. Kids must learn the value of planning moves in advance in order to win the game.

                  9. Go Nuts: Power Of Mathematics

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                    Ages: 8+

                    Number Of Players: 2-4

                    Go Nuts is a dice game that requires the adding up of points. This game is very fast paced and can usually be played in 12 minutes or less. The winner is the player who earns 50 points.

                    10. City Square Off: Power Of Spatial Thinking

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                      Ages: 8+

                      Number Of Players: 2 Teams Or Players

                      City square off is a tetris like board game. Kids or teams take turns building up their cities without going over the edge.

                      11. Gubs: Power Of Imagination

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                        Ages: 10+

                        Number Of Players: 2-6

                        Gubs is a card game designed to fire up a kid’s imagination, while taking about 20 minutes for complete play.

                        12. Candyland: Power Of Color

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                          Ages: 3+

                          Number Of Players: 2-4

                          Candyland is a classic Hasbro board game. Players take turns drawing a color card and moving their gingerbread man to the corresponding color.

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                          13. Chutes And Ladders: Power Of Decision-Making

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                            Ages: 4+

                            Number Of Players: 2-4

                            Chutes and ladders teaches the value of making good decisions through ‘climbing’ the ladder of success or chuting back down when a bad decision is made. The player to reach the number 100 square is the winner.

                            14. Fitz It: Power Of Language

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                              Ages: 10+

                              Number Of Players: 2-4

                              Fitz it is a card game with words. The cards have the definition of an object. The players must think of a corresponding object that matches the phrases. The winner is the one with no or the least number of cards at the end of play.

                              15. Feed The Kitty: Power Of Creativity

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                                Ages: 4+ 

                                Number Of Players: 2-5

                                Feed the kitty does not require the need to read in order to play. It does require players to try and outwit one another. The object of the game is to have the most mice left over.

                                16. Slamwich: Power Of Stealth

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                                  Age: 6+

                                  Number Of Players: 2-6

                                  Slamwich is a game to outwit the other players out of their cards. Lay down double deckers and be sure to shout ‘Stop Thief’ when you see one appear.

                                  17. Rory’s Story Cubes: Power Of Storytelling

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                                    Ages: 8+

                                    Number Of Players: 2-6

                                    Rory’s story cubes does not require reading in order to play. Roll the 9 image dice and tell a story with the images rolled. Players may play as long as they wish.

                                    18. Elephant’s Trunk: Pattern Recognition

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                                      Ages: 4+

                                      Number Of Players: 2-4

                                      Elephant’s trunk players are given suitcases and clothes tokens. The dice is color-coded with one side having a mouse. If the mouse is rolled the player loses a turn. When a color is rolled the coinciding clothing goes into the player’s trunk. The winner is the one with the most clothes in their trunk at the end of play.

                                      19. Castle Keep: Power Of Strategy

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                                        Ages: 8+

                                        Number Of Players: 2-4

                                        The object of Castle Keep is to build and fortify your castle before your opponent does. Or to leave your opponent’s castle in utter ruins.

                                        20. Ugly Doll: Power Of Quick Thinking

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                                          Ages: 6+

                                          Number Of Players: 2-6

                                          The object of Ugly Doll is to shout ‘Mine’ when 3 of the same cards are showing. The winner of the game is the one with the most cards at the end.

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                                          Last Updated on January 21, 2020

                                          The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                          The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                                          Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

                                          your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

                                            Why You Need a Vision

                                            Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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                                            How to Create Your Life Vision

                                            Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

                                            What Do You Want?

                                            The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

                                            It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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                                            Some tips to guide you:

                                            • Remember to ask why you want certain things
                                            • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
                                            • Give yourself permission to dream.
                                            • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
                                            • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

                                            Some questions to start your exploration:

                                            • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
                                            • What would you like to have more of in your life?
                                            • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
                                            • What are your secret passions and dreams?
                                            • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
                                            • What do you want your relationships to be like?
                                            • What qualities would you like to develop?
                                            • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
                                            • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
                                            • What would you most like to accomplish?
                                            • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

                                            It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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                                            What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

                                            Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

                                            A few prompts to get you started:

                                            • What will you have accomplished already?
                                            • How will you feel about yourself?
                                            • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
                                            • What does your ideal day look like?
                                            • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
                                            • What would you be doing?
                                            • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
                                            • How are you dressed?
                                            • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
                                            • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
                                            • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

                                            It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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                                            Plan Backwards

                                            It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

                                            • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
                                            • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
                                            • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
                                            • What important actions would you have had to take?
                                            • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
                                            • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
                                            • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
                                            • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
                                            • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

                                            Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

                                            It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

                                            Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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