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15 Most Beautiful Hidden Gems In America That Are Worth Seeing

15 Most Beautiful Hidden Gems In America That Are Worth Seeing

From Yosemite to the Everglades, the U.S. boasts world-famous landmarks. But we’re also a land of virtually undiscovered stretches of parkland and inviting towns smack in the middle of paradise. Here are some of the most gorgeous parks and small towns you’ve never heard of.

Valley of Fire State Park

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    One of the state’s best-loved parks is the Valley of Fire, 42,000 arid acres about an hour’s drive northeast from Las Vegas. The park delivers its own kind of high-stakes drama, trading neon lights and nightclubs for 150 million-year-old sandstone formations and 3,000-year-old petroglyphs (images carved in rock). You could even say it has star quality: the surreal, burnt-sienna landscape stood in for Mars in the 1990 movie Total Recall. If you’re embarking on your own photo safari or DIY sci-fi flick in Nevada’s largest state park, don’t miss Arch Rock, Elephant Rock, or the Beehives, all of which are essentially solid-stone versions of exactly what they sound like. And be sure to take snapshots with and without people in the frame — the structures are even more outstanding when you can get a sense of their scale. But bring lots of water with you — there are few facilities within the park, and the sandy stretches of some hikes make them more strenuous than you’d think, particularly in the summer, when Mojave Desert temperatures exceed 120 degrees. Best to come in spring or fall for a more comfortable trip.

    Where to stay: The park contains 72 campsites, including RV spots with water and electrical hookups (campsites cost $20 per night plus $10 for hookups; There is a $2 discount for Nevada residents). If that’s not your speed, the family-run North Shore Inn has a pool, in-room fridges, and powerful air conditioning, doubles from $85).

    Ludington State Park, Michigan

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      Snug between Lake Michigan and Hamlin Lake, this nearly 5,300-acre park has seven miles of sandy, dune-strewn beaches, a historic lighthouse you can climb, more than 20 miles of hiking trails (plus paths for biking and cross-country skiing), and the shallow, clear Big Sable River, which is perfect for drifting down in an inner tube. No wonder Ludington has been a Great Lakes-area favorite since it was established 76 years ago.

      Where to stay: Ludington’s four campgrounds fill up quickly; reserve campsites six months in advance or cabins and yurts one year out, when openings are posted (camping from $16). You can also try the Lamplighter Bed & Breakfast, an 1892 home with an original oak banister, leaded-glass windows, and a porcelain-tiled fireplace ( doubles from $115).

      Hammondsport, New York

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        Hammondsport, N.Y., may well be the recycling capital of America. Not garbage recycling (though they do that, too). We’re talking about the vintage seaplanes restored and flown by the Glenn H. Curtiss Museum (8419 State Rte. 54, glennhcurtissmuseum.org, admission $8.50). The birdhouses made of scrap wood in front of the Aroma Coffee Art Gallery (60 Shethar St., 607/569-3047, birdhouses from $40). Even the cypress paneling in the Bully Hill Vineyard’s lower dining room comes from old wine barrels (8843 Greyton H. Taylor Memorial Dr., bullyhill.com, smoked pulled pork sandwich $13).

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        “When my husband and I came back to live here, the first thing he did was start restoring old boats,” says Nancy Wightman, whose husband, Ed, grew up in the Finger Lakes region. “It’s not just about loving history. You get the sense that’s who the people here are.” It’s tempting to say that there’s something in the water, but Hammondsport’s passion for the past really comes with the wine. The Pleasant Valley Wine Company, opened in 1860, was the first in the Finger Lakes region (8260 Pleasant Valley Rd., pleasantvalleywine.com, bottles from $6). In 1962, a Ukrainian viticulturist further transformed the local wine industry at his Dr. Konstantin Frank Vinifera Wine Cellars by successfully planting European grapes in the colder New York climate (9749 Middle Rd., drfrankwines.com, bottles from $9).

        Today, both these wineries — and several more — are mainstays of the landscape. That’s literally true of Dr. Frank’s, which sits on an impossibly green piece of land overlooking its vineyards and sparkling, Y-shaped Keuka Lake. The vineyard is run by Fred Frank, Konstantin’s grandson. “I enjoy hearing stories about children sitting on my grandfather’s knee 40 years ago,” says Fred. “That’s very rewarding.” After all these years, tastings at Dr. Frank’s are still free. In fact, many of the best things in Hammondsport are, such as sunbathing on Keuka Lake’s condo-less waterfront or kicking back on the town square for outdoor summer Thursday night concerts. There are jam sessions in the basement of the Union Block Italian Bistro — spring for one of the plus-size meals, such as linguini and clam sauce (31 Shethar St., unionblockitalian.com, linguini with clam sauce $19).

        “We’re pretty darn proud of what we’ve built here,” says Mayor Emery Cummings, who has lived in Hammondsport for his entire life — 54 years, “and we’re hoping to keep it the way it’s always been.”

        Where to stay: You’ll find a spiral staircase, crown moldings, and vintage wallpaper in the octagonal 1859 home that has been converted into the Black Sheep Inn (8329 Pleasant Valley Rd, doubles from $149).

        Cache River State Natural Area, Illinois

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          There are a number of famous swamps in Illinois’ Cache River State Natural Area, a nearly 15,000-acre state park 30 miles from the Kentucky border. They include Everglades and Okefenokee, but one of the northernmost examples of a true Southern swamp is the delightfully under-the-radar Cache River park. It gets only about 200,000 annual visitors — that’s about one visitor per acre per month. Other life forms aren’t so scarce here: the park’s wetlands, floodplains, forests, and limestone barrens harbor more than 100 threatened or endangered species. It’s best explored by canoe; six miles of paddling trails will bring you face-to-face with massive tupelo and cypress trunks. There are also 20 miles of foot trails in the park and a floating boardwalk that leads to the center of Heron Pond, which is carpeted in summer with a bright-green layer of floating duckweed. BYO boat or rent one from White Crane Canoe and Pirogue Rentals in Ullin, Ill., about 12 miles west (canoe rental $15 per person per day).

          Weaverville, California

          Weaverville

            You expect certain trappings in any Gold Rush town. A saloon, a main street, maybe a hitching post. Also a 138-year-old working Chinese temple. No? You’ll find one in Weaverville, where the Joss House State Historic Park is a testament to the town’s unsung history of tolerance (630 Main St., admission $4). Chinese immigrants, facing discrimination in ports such as San Francisco, were welcomed here and ultimately accounted for up to 25 percent of the Rush-era population.

            “Some of our staff looks at this place as a museum piece you just have to keep clean and take care of,” says guide Jack Frost. “But Chinese people who work in the parks system say it’s a national treasure.” Maybe it’s the mining connection, but Weaverville is a place where you often strike it rich in unexpected places. The 1854 drugstore and bank are now home to the La Grange Cafe, which features a wildly creative menu of boar, rabbit, and buffalo-as well as an impressive wine cellar in the old bank vault (520 Main St., 530/623-5325, buffalo burger $11). Mamma Llama Eatery & Cafe hosts a surprisingly funky roster of live musicians: Gypsy jazz, junkyard percussion, even didgeridoo (490 Main St, hoagie $5.75).

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            Where to stay: One place that hews to a more period Old West experience is the 132-year-old Weaverville Hotel, which features four-poster beds, clawfoot tubs, and a peaceful Victorian library (481 Main St, doubles from $99).

            Blackwater Falls State Park, West Virginia

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              Blackwater Falls’s namesake cascade isn’t just the most picturesque spot in this 2,456-acre park—it’s also one of the most photographed places in the state. The area is equally eye-catching when it’s dressed in the bright greens of spring, the Crayola-box colors of autumn, or silvery winter, when parts of the falls freeze into man-sized icicles. The falls themselves, more brown than black, get their distinctive hue from tannic acid that leaches into the river from hemlock and red spruce needles upstream.

              Where to stay: Outdoorsy types can pitch a tent at 65 campsites, or upgrade to one of 26 deluxe cabins with full kitchens, private bathrooms, and fireplaces—but not A/C. For that creature comfort, you’ll need to book a night in the 54-room lodge, which also has a game room and an indoor pool. (camping from $20, lodge rooms from $84).

              Damascus, Virginia

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                If you decide to drive to Damascus, you’ll likely be in the minority. This hiking and cycling heaven is where seven major trails intersect, trails including the undulating Virginia Creeper and the granddaddy of them all: the 2,180-mile Appalachian Trail. In a nifty bit of irony, six of the seven trails converge in a parking lot, at Mojoes Trailside Coffee House (331 Douglas Dr, lattes from $3.50), where you’ll find a clutch of locals and through-hikers chatting about travel plans. Breakfast is the big meal in town, and the more energy-boosting calories the better.

                Yet the carb-loading, hardcore trekkers you’ll find in Damascus don’t always look as you’d expect. “Mamaw B.” (her adopted trail name) was in town beginning her usual 15- to 18-mile hike. She’s 71 and has been backpacking for 31 years. “The secret to good health is to remain active and to always have something to look forward to,” she says, as she sets off from Mojoes toward — where, exactly? She just smiles and points north.

                Where to stay: The Lazy Fox Inn is famous less for its trailside location than for its legendary country breakfast that includes cheese grits, scrambled eggs, hashbrowns, biscuits and gravy, and sausage (133 Imboden St, doubles with private bath from $85).

                Katy Trail State Park, Missouri

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                  The largest rails-to-trails conversion in America, the 240-mile Katy Trail spans Missouri’s midsection from Clinton in the west to Machens in the east, along the former track of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad (a.k.a. the Katy). The mostly flat path is open to hikers and cyclists — and in some sections, horseback riders — and traverses historic railroad bridges, tunnels, forests, valleys, and open fields. In spots, it skirts the edge of the Missouri River. Some hardy souls tackle the whole trail (a roughly five-day undertaking for an experienced cyclist), but those who prefer a more leisurely trek should consider a day-trip between Rocheport and Boonville, two early 19th century towns (the latter established by Daniel Boone’s offspring) separated by 12 miles of nature preserves, vineyards, and river views.

                  Where to stay: There are no campgrounds in the park, but you can have your pick of small-town inns along the route. Some cater to cyclists with extras such as free laundry service, double-size whirlpool tubs, and free bike storage and tune-up tools. Rocheport’s School House Bed & Breakfast, in a three-story brick schoolhouse from 1914, sweetens the deal with fresh-baked cookies at check-in, (doubles from $149).

                  Ohiopyle State Park, Pennsylvania

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                    If ever there were an all-purpose park, southwestern Pennsylvania’s Ohiopyle State Park would be it. Looking for waterfalls? It has four, which seems as if it must have inspired Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house, just five miles away. Trails? Hikers get 79 miles of them — plus 27 miles for cyclists, 11 for folks on horseback, and nearly 40 for cross-country skiers. And why not throw in a natural water slide or two? The lifeblood of the 20,000-acre park, however, is the Youghiogheny River Gorge — a.k.a. the Yough. The Middle Yough, which flows to Ohiopyle from Confluence, Pa., is the gentler section, with Class I and II rapids for rafters and kayakers; the Lower Yough downstream gets up to Class IV whitewater. Combined, they attract a good chunk of the one million people who visit the park every year.

                    Where to stay: The quietest campsites in Ohiopyle’s Kentuck campground are the walk-in sites numbered 51-64 and 103-115; however, some folks have found the camp’s firm 9 p.m. quiet hours a little too restrictive. If your brood tends to get livelier as the night wears on, consider a vacation rental in Hidden Valley, Pa., or Seven Springs, Pa., both less than 30 miles to the northeast; these two ski towns have solid selections of rental condos and homes that can be deeply discounted in the off-season.

                    Pismo Beach, California

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                      Outdoors and adventure activities are plentiful in Pismo Beach, including golfing, bicycling, tennis, hiking, horseback riding, and scuba diving. The area boasts miles of beautiful, clean beaches with pools, coves, and caves that visitors can explore. There’s also the Pismo Pier, a 12,200-foot pier that’s a popular spot for sightseeing, walking, fishing, and sunset watching. And, best of all, visitors to Pismo Beach will be in prime position to visit some of the other amazing destinations on San Luis Obispo County’s Wine Coast.

                      Jekyll Island, Georgia

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                        At the turn of the century, Jekyll Island was one of the most coveted vacation destinations for America’s jet-set luminaries. Today, the resort has opened its ranks to a much wider variety of holiday makers, with golf courses, year-round festivals, and accommodation options to boot. However, this is a place that still bears the regal touch of class, one of its most defining features in the past, and the historic district stands as a beautiful example of 20th-century American high society. Jekyll Island is also home to some quintessentially East Coast marshlands and beachfronts that have helped make it a favorite among families and couples looking for somewhere to relax.

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                        Fayetteville, West Virginia

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                          Small-town hospitality, gorgeous historic buildings, and all the excitement of the New River Gorge are what make Fayetteville, West Virginia, one of America’s coolest small towns. Tourists flood the town in droves during peak rafting season along the indomitable New River Gorge, but if white water doesn’t suit your fancy there are tons of fun ways to explore nature in the area; ACE Adventure Resort and Adventures on the Gorge are both companies that offer canopy tours, hiking, horseback riding, and more. The town is bustling with adventure outfitter companies, local eateries, boutique bed and breakfasts, and unique art galleries, all housed in impeccably restored Victorian, Romanesque Revival and Queen Anne-style buildings. Their historical district was designated in the National Register in 1990.

                          Estes Park, Colorado

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                            Estes Park is a perfectly picturesque mountain town hidden among the pine forests of Colorado’s Estes Valley. It is also the gateway to the Rocky Mountain National Park, 415 square miles of wild and varied terrain that is home to a dense concentration of wildlife and the site of some of the best hiking in the United States. The town itself is quaint and scenic collection of Victorian buildings — the feeling of small-town remoteness is encouraged by the Stanley Hotel, the original inspiration for Stephen King’s The Shining.

                            Door County, Wisconsin

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                              Door County, Wisconsin, is definitely an area worth exploring. With its limitless nature-seeking opportunities, beautiful lighthouses to climb, and local art at every turn, there’s always something to discover in this humble little county. The 104-year-old Peninsula State Park is host to a variety of outdoor activities and an estimated one million visitors annually. Within its 3776 acres, it has four campgrounds, a lighthouse, a theater, a golf course, bike trails, and plenty of vantage points for nature viewing.

                              Fort Bragg, California

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                                Fort Bragg has a long and storied past as a a Company Town, but it has re-emerged as a lovely seaside vacation getaway. Three hours north of San Francisco, it’s certainly off the beaten path — but those are the best kind of escapes. However, Fort Bragg’s coolest brag is its glass beach: when piles of discarded material, liquor bottles, pre-1967 auto taillights, shattered apothecary bottles and broken windows were dumped into the ocean, they found themselves washed back ashore, literally sanded down and gleaming in the sunlight, forming the glass beach. The glittering shores, expansive coastal views, a sprawling botanical garden, and great local food and wine make Fort Bragg an awesome place to wander and explore.

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                                Last Updated on October 16, 2018

                                The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

                                The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

                                It’s well past midnight and you’ve got to get up in less than six hours. You toss and turn all night. Before you know it, another hour passes by and you start panicking.

                                If I don’t get to sleep in the next 30 minutes, I’m going to be exhausted tomorrow!”

                                One thing is for sure, you’re not alone. Over 70M+ Americans have stated that they don’t get the proper sleep they need at night.[1] So what could possibly be causing this insomnia epidemic?

                                Throughout my entrepreneurial journey of building my language learning company, I have experimented and researched dozens of best sleep practices. Some have flopped but a few have dramatically improved the quality of my life and work.

                                In this article, I’ll look into the reason why you’re sleep deprived and how to sleep through the night tonight.

                                Why you can’t sleep through the night

                                The first step to improving anything is getting to the bottom of the root problem. Different studies have shown the reasons why most people cannot sleep well at night.[2] Here are the main ones that the average person faces:

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                                Stress

                                If you’ve ever stayed up at night worrying about something, know that it’s a major sleep inhibitor. When you’re feeling stress, your mind and body becomes more activated, making it incredibly difficult to fall asleep. Even when you do manage to sleep, it won’t be deep enough to help you feel rested the next day.

                                Exposure to blue light before sleep time

                                We’re exposed to harmful blue light on a daily basis through the use of our digital screens. If you’ve never heard of blue light, it’s part of the visible light spectrum that suppresses melatonin, our sleep hormones. Other harmful effects include digital eye strains and macular cellular damage.

                                While daytime exposure to blue light is not very harmful, night time exposure tricks our brain into thinking it’s daytime. By keeping your brain alert and suppressing melatonin, your mind is unable to shut down and relax before bedtime.

                                Eating close to bedtime

                                Eating too late can actually be an issue for many people, especially those who are older than 40. The reason is, eating before laying down increases the chances of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acid backflows into the esophagus.

                                Another reason not to eat too late is sleep quality. Even if you manage to sleep right after eating, it’s likely that you’ll wake up tired. Instead of letting your body rest during sleep, it has to digest the food that was entered before bedtime.

                                Rule of thumb: eat 3-4 hours before bedtime.

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                                Medical conditions

                                In some cases, it could be medical conditions that cause your sleep problems. If you can’t relate yourself to the above reasons or any of these common sleep problem causes, you should visit the doctor.

                                The vicious sleep cycle

                                The biggest danger to repeating the bad habits mentioned above is the negative cycle that it can take you through. A bad night’s sleep can affect not only your energy but your willpower and decision making skills.

                                Here’s an example of a bad sleep pattern:

                                You get a bad night’s sleep
                                –> You feel tired and stressful throughout the day.
                                –> You compensate it with unhealthy habits (for example junk food, skipping exercises, watching Netflix etc.)
                                –> You can’t sleep well (again) the next night.

                                  You can imagine what could happen if this cycle repeats over a longer period of time.

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                                  How to sleep better (throughout the night)

                                  To help you break the vicious cycle and stop waking up in the middle of the night, I’ll explain to you a list of actionable steps to solve your trouble staying asleep.

                                  1. Take control over the last 90 minutes of your night

                                  What you do (or don’t do) before bedtime have significant impact on the quality of your sleep. Many times, it can be the difference between staying up until 4am and sleeping like a baby.

                                  Here are a few suggestions:

                                  • Go from light to dark – Darkness stimulates production of the sleep hormone melatonin. Turn off unused light around the house, and think about investing into warm light that you can use in the bedroom before bedtime.
                                  • Avoid screens (or wear blue light blocking glasses) – Keep the bedroom a technology-free zone as the light from electronic devices can disturb your sleep. If you need to work, wear blue light blocking glasses (also known as computer glasses) throughout or before you sleep to prevent sleep disruption.
                                  • Find an activity that helps you to wind down  This could be anything that calms you down, and reduces thinking (especially unnecessary stress). Fir example, listening to soothing/good feel music, taking a hot bath, reading or meditating.
                                  • Keep any electronics you have on the other side of the room or outside the room – One of the most harmful things that can disrupt your sleep is the notifications you get from your smartphones. The simplest way to avoid this is to keep it away from you.
                                  • Create a bedtime routine – A night routine is a couple of things you do prior to going to bed. By doing these things every night, you’ll have a more restful and high-quality sleep. Learn how to pick up a night routine here: The Ultimate Night Routine Guide to Sleep Better and Wake Up Productive

                                  2. Eat the right nutrients (and avoid the wrong ones)

                                  What you eat (not just when we eat) plays a critical role in your sleep quality. If you’re ever in doubt of what to eat to improve your sleep, take the following into consideration:

                                  • Kiwi – This green fruit may be the ultimate pre-bed snack. When volunteers ate two kiwis an hour before hitting the hay, they slept almost a full extra hour. Kiwis are full of vitamins C and E, serotonin and folate—all of which may help you snooze.
                                  • Soy foods – Foods made with soy such as tofu, miso and edamame, are rich in isoflavones. These compounds increase the production of serotonin, a brain chemical that influences the body’s sleep-wake cycle.
                                  • Fiber-rich foods – Eating more fiber could be key for better sleep. Eating fiber was associated with more restorative slow-wave sleep—the more you eat, the better you sleep—per a study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Fiber prevents blood sugar surges that may lower melatonin. Get a fiber boost from beans, artichokes, bran cereal and quinoa.
                                  • Salmon – Most fish, especially salmon, halibut and tuna boost vitamin B6, which is needed to make melatonin— a sleep-inducing hormone triggered by darkness.

                                  3. Adjust your sleep temperature

                                  Once you’ve gone through the first 2 recommendations, the last step to experiment with is temperature. According to Sleep.org, the ideal temperature for sleep is 60-67 Farenheit. This may be cooler than what most people are used to, but keep in mind that our body temperature changes once we fall asleep.

                                  Rule of thumb: sleeping in cooler temperature is better for sleep quality than warmer temperature.

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                                  Find out how to maintain the optimal temperature to sleep better here: How to Sleep Faster with the Best Temperature

                                  Sleep better form now on

                                  Congrats on making it to the end of this guide on sleep. If you’re serious about taking the necessary steps in improving your sleep, remember to take it one step at a time.

                                  I recommend trying just one of the steps mentioned such as taking a hot bath, blocking out blue light at night, or sleeping in cooler temperature. From there, see how it impacts your sleep quality and you can keep doing what works, and throw away what doesn’t.

                                  As long as you follow these steps cautiously and diligently, I know you’ll see improved results in your sleep!

                                  Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

                                  Reference

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