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13 Future Predictions That Were Incredibly Wrong

13 Future Predictions That Were Incredibly Wrong

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    Future predictions are a funny thing. Although some may seem ridiculous, or at the very least misguided, there’s always people who are pessimistic about seemingly impossible feats and changes. Here we have thirteen of the most incorrect future predictions ever made:

    1859

    “Drill for oil? You mean drill into the ground to try and find oil? You’re crazy.”

    Associates of Edwin L. Drake refusing his suggestion to drill for oil.

    1873

    No surgeon will ever operate on the heart or brain: “The abdomen, the chest and the brain will forever be shut from the intrusion of the wise and humane surgeon.”

    Sir John Eric Ericksen, British Surgeon.

    1878

    “When the Paris exhibition closes, electric light will close with it and no more will be heard of it.”

    Erasmus Wilson, Oxford Professor. 

    1883

    “X-Rays will prove to be a hoax.”

    Lord Kelvin, President of the Royal Society.

    1888

    “It is not demonstrated that a true flying machine, self-raising, self-sustaining, self-propelling, is physical impossible?”

    Professor Joseph Le Conte, Popular Science Monthly.

    1903

    “The horse is here to stay, but the automobile is a novelty – a fad.”

    The President of The Michigan Savings Bank.

    1912

    “Titanic passengers all all rescued: giant new liner limping towards Halifax badly damaged.”

    Syracuse Herald.

    1919

    “Taking the best left-handed pitcher in baseball and converting him to a right-handed fielder is one of the dumbest things I ever heard.”

    Tris Speaker, Baseball Hall of Famer on Babe Ruth.

    1920

    “A rocket will never be able to leave the Earth’s atmosphere.”

    The New York Times.

    1944

    “You better get secretarial work or get married.”

    Emmeline Snively, advising would-be model Marilyn Monroe.

    1948

    “Television won’t last. It’s just a flash in a pan.”

    Mary Somerville, pioneer of radio educational broadcasts.

    1955

    “Rock n’ roll? It’ll be gone by June.”

    Variety Magazine. 

    2005

    “This website venture is the sort of failure that is simply unsurvivable.”

    Nikki Finke, LA Weekly.

    The Future That Never Happened: 13 Failed Predictions That Couldn’t Have Been More Wrong | Visual.ly, Hendrick’s and The Huffington Post

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    Last Updated on December 2, 2018

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

    Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

    The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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    The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

    Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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    Review Your Past Flow

    Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

    Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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    Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

    Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

    Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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    Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

    Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

    We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

    Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

      Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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