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12 False Beliefs About American Small Towns

12 False Beliefs About American Small Towns

If you haven’t lived in an American small town in the last 30 years, you may have grown up with a nostalgic, sentimental idea of what one is or was. They no longer resemble the TV images that were brought to us by shows like “Gilmore Girls” and “The Andy Griffith Show.”  As if they ever did, right?

The contemporary country music video version still flickering on cable is also a construct, not a reality.

Maybe it is legitimate to say the image is what is aspired to – by some.

Absent is the real grit of real life in a small town, which is more about battling empty store fronts, aging inhabitants out of step with modern times, disillusioned youths, and rising crime; it is also less about easy going attitudes with a rise in more anxious and uncertain ones.

And with the desire of small towns to rebuild themselves and attract new inhabitants, members are forced to face and deal with the false beliefs about American small towns.

1. Small Towns Are Individual Communities

community

    We may share the same tax rates and weather in a small town, but we do live in different communities. Lets call them micro-communities. Some intentionally set themselves apart from their neighbors, others are set apart by culture, or just the desire to deny reality and cultural changes.

    Other micro-communities come and go with the seasons, like with migrant farming families, who are an important part of the agricultural community, and who may put down permanent roots for their children.

    Peal back the thin skin of a small town, and there are cultural, financial, linguistic, racial, ideological, and theological rifts and fences to be found. Look at data historically, and you might find that these differences go back many generations.

    And then there is resentment between the groups who seem to be battling for their last corner of what they thought their American small town was suppose to be, even if it was a mere illusion.

    Bringing the diverse communities together, ones that are diverse in taste, opinion, and culture ought to be a goal, versus just a ruling family like group lording over the peasants that happen to live, work, shop, and pay taxes in their realm.

    2. Small Town Crime Is Low Or Only Innocuous

    theft

      It may seem low, but it gets personal in a small town pretty quickly if the convenience store or bank is only three blocks from your back door and an armed robbery takes place. Sometimes you learn about it because you see the flashing lights or hear the siren calls of the police cars, but often times it is a leading headline on the local newspaper.

      Today, there are websites like My Local Crime regularly display crimes like the one pictured above on various maps.

      And even if the crime is low, a situation can easily turn deadly like in a small Texas town, where the police chief was shot and later died after a traffic stop. As one officer said, a peaceful day can turn deadly in a few moments in a small town.

      Often times, examples such as these are used to justify militarizing the police, and how can you argue? Unless you witness smoke grenades and sound boom devices used on a neighbor believed to threaten suicide.

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      Or an attack dog on someone shouting in a street also threatening self-harm. Having witnessed such events, not only do I wonder what in the world is going wrong, I wonder if the police don’t need the practices in combination with better ways to handle tough, long, stressful situations.

      3.  Everyone Gets A Say And Can Participate In A Small Town

      yelling

        This is sort of true and sort of not true. There are those who disenfranchise themselves by not showing up to meetings. There are those who do a lot of complaining but don’t do a whole lot more to get involved to rectifying problems.

        Then there is the same faces on the board of this or that or the club of this or that. The young don’t seem to make time. The old have only so much energy. Those that do, do it all and need more help.

        And it seems sometimes that it small circles of people who are included and acknowledged, because they’ve known each other for years or because they really are not very inclusive. One bad apple can spoil a small bunch. Small town politics seem to be a popularity contest that goes on forever.

        If you are willing to lean in, to be organized, to work with people, especially as a volunteer or someone who can motivate volunteers, then you’ve got opportunity in a small town to make a big impact. You can train and become a volunteer fire fighter.

        You can be on any number of committees. Churches always welcome another pair of helpful hands. There are problems others haven’t been able to address you might do something about, like homeless pets.

        There are a number of nonprofits that are started just to address problems any area faces. Just start doing some research and start networking.

        It won’t necessarily be smooth sailing from the get go. And don’t expect a small local government to open its arms or its purse strings to solve a problem that bothers just you.

        Just get ready to take it on full force yourself!

        4. People Are Neighborly And Not Confrontational In A Small Town

        together

          If you haven’t witnessed a neighborly dispute or been involved in one about loud music or where organic trash piles are allowed, you can read quotes and get some great head shots of shouting people at town meetings in your local paper.

          Nothing makes a town meeting more fun than someone disagreeing about his right to bare arms while packing heat during a meeting, or someone showing up in just a coat, then stripping down to nothing and shouting at board members, both of which made local news in two small towns in which I worked in the last 10 years.

          People shout. People get snarky. People insult each other directly. Luckily I guess that sort of news isn’t archived regularly on websites for a quick search, but it won’t be long before someone is quick enough with their smartphone video record feature.

          In the between time, we have fun little moments like lawyers and former mayors throwing jars of Vaseline at governors.

          Hopefully people move forward with a more live and let live outlook or at least learn to turn the other cheek, because in a small town, you are bound to run into each other at Dollar General or Walmart.

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          5. Small Town Life Is Less Stressful

          file000584114005

            If there is crime, violence, and confrontation, might there be some stress in the community?  There are those that can coast by, but take one small town and put on one big event, and suddenly people are running circles around themselves – and there is always an event or a fundraiser.

            Then there are the stresses caused from just having to work with the same two or three people every day five days a week, and dealing with the same sometimes idiosyncratic customers each week. Add some raised electrical bills, gas prices, water bills and suddenly there are fireworks at town meetings and on the editorial page about the cost of living rising and the pay-rates stagnating.

            People struggling with their finances and employment deal with the stigma of being known as poor. They may even get labeled as trash. They may get handouts, but have fewer real opportunities to pull themselves out of their situation. And their children deal with evictions and regular food anxiety.

            The documentary Rich Hill brings to light the story of three boys living in a small town who are struggling against their circumstances. In an interview on The Cycle, filmmaker Tracy Tragos expresses the desire to show things as they are versus how others would like to think they are.

            The film itself does well in showcasing just how unromantic the reality of small town living really is.

            6. Small Town Life Is Healthier

            Healthy Living

              Daily Finance may claim this to be true, but I found that hard to swallow when I see people smoking openly while standing on sidewalks where there are full calorie soda bottles, empty beer bottles, and fast food wrappers lying in the gutters. Then I came across some of the research that was inspiration for the claim on Gallup.

              Gallup had updated their findings after Daily Finance had published their article. The truth is, large metro areas are doing better in the area of health and well being, and small towns are battling the bulge, just like everyone else.

              You would think fresh produce would be overly abundant in the middle of farm country, but as in my area, it is just as expensive and perishable as it always has been, junk food is as plentiful and nonperishable as ever, and farmer’s markets aren’t always open or convenient or reliable as, say, Walmart.

              If a market may or may not have fresh vegetables, may I or may I not show up?  (And have you picked-up on the fact that Walmart changes a town, maybe giving farmer’s markets a shove down not a leg up.)

              Then there are incidents of cancer clusters, like in Fallon, Nevada. Or, did you hear about fish consumption advisories from you local department of health? Anyone want to go drop a pole over the bridge railing and see what is good to catch?

              If the trash in the water or on the banks didn’t put you off, then finding out about containment ponds upriver failing or leaking into waterways will turn you off pretty fast.

              7. Small Town People Stick Together And Are Less Dysfunctional

              brick by brick

                There are groups that work well together, and then there are the micro-communities that work against each other. It can be like a replay of high school. But for every great idea, for every worthy cause, there will be naysayers. There will be those that say the sky is falling, who will name 100 things wrong with your idea.

                You want a park for the children to play in? But “they” will litter and destroy the property. Older kids will hangout and do drugs.

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                Want to save animals?  “They” will take the dogs and breed more bad breeds. “They” will cost too much. “They” don’t want their taxes going to feeding unwanted animals.

                Want to clean up the litter and put in some beautiful areas, maybe a community garden?  “They” will litter more. “They” will deface. “They” will not fund it. “They” will find it too expensive.

                You will even see the opinions spread across the newspaper as if they are verifiable facts. It will be an uphill climb against people in higher-than-thou places you didn’t realize were so negative and cranky.

                You may even wonder if your whole area is cranky!  You may find them attacking your character or way of life or your politics.  It may be about litter, but you get raked over hot coals as a sort of amusement.  What can we say? These types of folks are everywhere, even small towns.

                8. There Is Less Traffic In Small Towns

                empty lane

                  Ha – excuse me while I wipe the tears from my eyes!  If I could take an alternative route around a town without finding a bridge out, getting stuck behind a truck hauling chickens, or just not getting stuck behind someone going 10 miles per hour or less under the speed limit, I would have to site that all the big logging trucks, produce trucks, livestock trucks and more have to go through small towns to get to big highways, and in towns I’ve lived and worked in, that is Main Street.

                  And with export increasing, it has gotten to be a congestion problem for many towns.

                  Of course I love the argument against bypass routes, which cost millions and take years to complete, that if we let people bypass a town, then small towns will lose what little commerce it gets now.

                  Because we know all those truckers are just going to pull over on our two lane Main Streets and buy antiques and order big hot plates every time they pass through. And we know families will love to park and walk alongside Main Streets congested with overweight, wide load trucks.

                  And with the speed limits at 60, slowing down to 45, 35, and 25 with a few lights, timing is everything. Get behind a big rig, and you’ll be chugging behind the lumbering trucks all the way out of town.

                  9. Small Towns Are Beautiful

                  Beautiful Homes

                    Not typically or stridently. There is a reason that there are top 10 and 20 lists of beautiful small towns, because there are vastly more ugly ones to compare them to, like Goldfield, Nevada, which is cited on an Ag Talk thread.

                    Empty storefronts are pretty ugly, aesthetically and financially, and to combat the realities that people are inclined to move away when there is less and less offered in small towns, forums, articles, organizations and alliances are forming to get new businesses started.

                    Real Tourism Marketing suggests using empty storefronts to display artwork. Other towns are starting Main Street Saturdays, where people come together to make their Main Street lively.

                    American Express has a Shop Small campaign they are promoting which towns participate in. And then there is the National Main Street Center, a large resource that helps preserve and promote small towns, giving them a leg up in reinvesting in and reinventing themselves, trying to reverse the dwindling trends of previous decades.

                    It has to be said, some small towns are making a comeback because of their collective desire to reinvent themselves and families’ growing desires to leave the crowded metropolitan areas.

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                    10. Small Towns Are Quiet

                    quiet

                      What’s that? I can’t hear you – there’s a cargo jet passing overhead. Or there is a freight train passing by? Or, there are logging trucks banging by?

                      Or there is bass playing out of a car. Maybe the trailer of a truck going BANG over a pothole. Or the Army base is doing artillery training, while the fire trucks are heading out.

                      Perhaps the town siren’s are going off to call the firemen to the station. Then there is your neighbor’s barking dogs.

                      In some cases, towns may have one stop light or no traffic, but it is definitely not a given!

                      11. American Small Towns Have A Lower Cost Of Living

                      rocking chair

                        Sure, as long as you don’t want to go anywhere or do anything, which will cost a half a tank of gas or more to get to. Then there is the 45 minutes to get someplace, and the 45 minutes to get back.

                        And yes, it is less expensive to get work done to your house, but then you may or may not be able to get decent work done. Then there are taxes to do anything and everything, taxes which will go up.

                        And if taxes are low, health insurance has always been high, because of some cancer cluster in your area, the poor drinking water, or some environmental secrete left behind by pesticides or a closed factory.

                        The upside of American small towns is that they weather the downturn in the economy, because there wasn’t very far to go. Houses were historically slow to sell and sold for less than their equivalents in the city.

                        Expectations are low, so people sell for less than they should sometimes.

                        Retiring to a small town, especially if you are retiring from the north into a southern area, will definitely make your pension go farther. It also will help perk up the local housing market.

                        But watch out for the local culture, because the only local concerts being given and festivals being put on may not have any appeal for you.

                        12. Small Towns Are A Refuge

                        town parade

                          Or maybe they are an asylum or an institution…On websites like Cracked, they are the object of humor, saying small towns are where city people go to develop drug abuse problems and to access questionable drinking water. A Twitter feed called Small Town Problems laughs the dilemmas off saying rushing a friend to a hospital takes 45 minutes and that the hour bus ride to school is where you learned everything you are ever going to learn.

                          Regardless, I can’t help but be charmed by small towns. I love quirky old buildings that are reinvented as restaurants or coffee shops. I adore old signs and vintage gas pumps.

                          I watch American Pickers with excitement. And I wish with all my heart that small towns get a second life, one that is vibrant and healthy. But to do so, there are modern problems that will have to be dealt with, ones that create drag on progress.

                          Featured photo credit: SDR and Co via mrg.bz

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                          Last Updated on March 30, 2020

                          Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (And What to Do About It)

                          Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (And What to Do About It)

                          Feeling tired all the time?

                          Have you ever caught yourself nodding off when you’re watching TV, listening to someone drone on during a meeting or even driving a car?

                          I know I have, especially when I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive.

                          Feeling tired all the time may be more widespread than you think. In fact, two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week.[1]

                          If you’re tired of feeling tired, then I’ve got some great news for you. New research is helping us gain critical insights into the underlying causes of feeling tired all the time.

                          In this article, we’ll discuss the latest reasons why you’re feeling tired all the time and practical steps you can take to finally get to the bottom of your fatigue and feel rested.

                          What Happens When You’re Too Tired

                          If you sleep just two hours less than the normal eight hours, you could be as impaired as someone who has consumed up to three beers.[2] And you’ve probably experienced the impact yourself.

                          Here are some common examples of what happens when you’re feeling tired:[3]

                          • You may have trouble focusing because memory and learning functions may be impaired within your brain.
                          • You may experience mood swings and an inability to differentiate between what’s important and what’s not because your brain’s neurotransmitters are misfiring.
                          • You may get dark circles under your eyes and/or your skin make look dull and lackluster in the short term and over time your skin may get wrinkles and show signs of aging because your body didn’t have time to remove toxins during sleep.
                          • You may find it more difficult to exercise or to perform any type of athletic activity.
                          • Your immune system may weaken causing you to pick up infections more easily.
                          • You may overeat because not getting enough sleep activates the body’s endocannabinoids even when you’re not hungry.
                          • Your metabolism slows down so what you eat is more likely to be stored as belly fat.

                          Are you saying that feeling tired can make me overweight?

                          Unfortunately, yes!

                          Feeling tired all the time can cause you to put on the pounds especially around your waist. But it is a classic chicken and egg situation, too.

                          Heavier people are more likely to feel fatigued during the day than lighter ones. And that’s even true for overweight people who don’t have sleep apnea (source: National Institutes of Health).

                          Speaking of sleep apnea, you may be wondering if that or something else is causing you to feel tired all the time.

                          Why Are you Feeling Tired All the Time?

                          Leading experts are starting to recognize that there are three primary reasons people feel tired on a regular basis: sleep deprivation, fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

                          Here’s a quick overview of each root cause of feeling tired all of the time:

                          1. Tiredness occurs from sleep deprivation when you don’t get high-quality sleep consistently. It typically can be solved by changing your routine and getting enough deep restorative sleep.
                          2. Fatigue occurs from prolonged sleeplessness which could be triggered by numerous issues such as mental health issues, long-term illness, fibromyalgia, obesity, sleep apnea or stress. It typically can be improved by changing your lifestyle and using sleep aids or treatments, if recommended by your physician.
                          3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a medical condition also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis that occurs from persistent exhaustion that doesn’t go away with sleep.

                          The exact cause of CFS is not known, but it may be due to problems with the immune system, a bacterial infection, a hormone imbalance or emotional trauma.

                          It typically involves working with a doctor to rule out other illnesses before diagnosing and treating CFS.[4]

                          Always consult a physician to get a personal diagnosis about why you are feeling tired, especially if it is a severe condition.

                          Feeling Tired vs Being Fatigued

                          If lack of quality sleep doesn’t seem to be the root cause for you, then it’s time to explore fatigue as the reason you are frequently feeling tired.

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                          Until recently, tiredness and fatigue were thought to be interchangeable. Leading experts now realize that tiredness and fatigue are different.

                          Tiredness is primarily about lack of sleep.

                          But fatigue is a perceived feeling of being tired that is much more likely to occur in people who have depression, anxiety or emotional stress and/or are overweight and physically inactive (source: Science Direct).

                          Symptoms of fatigue include:

                          • Difficulty concentrating
                          • Low stamina
                          • Difficulty sleeping
                          • Anxiety
                          • Low motivation

                          These symptoms may sound similar to those of tiredness but they usually last longer and are more intense.

                          Unfortunately, there is no definitive reason why fatigue occurs because it can be a symptom of an emotional or physical illness. But there are still a number of steps you can take to reduce difficult symptoms by making a few simple lifestyle changes.

                          How Much Sleep Is Enough?

                          The number one reason you may feel tired is because of sleep deprivation which means you are not getting enough high-quality sleep.

                          Most adults need 7 to 9 hours of high-quality, uninterrupted sleep per night. If you’re sleep deprived, the amount of sleep you need increases.

                          So, quantity and quality do matter when it comes to sleep.

                          The key to quality sleep is being able to get long, uninterrupted sleep cycles throughout the night. It typically takes 90 minutes for you to reach a state of deep REM sleep where your body’s healing crew goes to work.

                          Ideally, you want to get at least 3 to 4 deep REM sleep cycles in per night. That’s why it’s so important to stay asleep for 7 or more hours.

                          Research also shows that people who think they can get by on less sleep don’t perform as well as people who get at least seven hours of sleep a night[5] So, you should definitely plan on getting seven hours of deep restorative sleep every night.

                          If you are not getting 7 hours of high-quality sleep regularly, then sleep deprivation is most likely reason you feel tired all the time.

                          And that is good news because sleep deprivation is much simpler and easier to address than the other root causes.

                          It’s also a good idea to rule out sleep deprivation as the reason why you are tired before moving on to the other possibilities such as fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which may require a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

                          4 Simple Changes to Reduce Fatigue

                          Personally, I’m a big believer in upgrading your lifestyle to uplift your life. I overcame chronic stress and exhaustion by making these four changes to my lifestyle:

                          1. Eating healthy, home-cooked meals versus microwaving processed foods or eating out
                          2. Exercising regularly
                          3. Using stressbusters
                          4. Creating a bedtime routine to sleep better

                          So, I know it is possible to change your lifestyle even when you’re working crazy hours and have lots of family responsibilities.

                          After I made the 4 simple changes in my lifestyle, I no longer felt exhausted all of the time.

                          In addition, I lost two inches off my waist and looked and felt better than ever.

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                          I was so excited that I wanted to help others replace stress and exhaustion with rest and well-being, too. That’s why I became a Certified Holistic Wellness Coach through the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute.

                          Interestingly enough, I discovered that Dr. Sears recommends a somewhat similar L.E.A.N. lifestyle:

                          • L is for Lifestyle and means living healthy including getting enough sleep.
                          • E is for Exercise and means getting at least 20 minutes of exercise a day ideally for six days a week.
                          • A is for Attitude and means thinking positive and reducing stress whenever possible.
                          • N is for Nutrition and means emphasizing a right-fat diet, not a low-fat diet.

                          The L.E.A.N. lifestyle is a scientifically-proven way to reduce fatigue, get to the optimal weight and to achieve overall wellness.[6]

                          And yes, there does seem to be an important correlation between being lean and feeling rested.

                          But overall based on my personal experience and Dr. Sear’s scientific proof, the key to not feeling tired all of the time does seem to be 4 simple changes to your lifestyle.

                          L — Living Healthy

                          Getting enough high-quality sleep every day is the surefire way to help you feel less fatigued, more rested and better overall.

                          So, whether you’re sleep deprived or potentially suffering from fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, you probably want to find a way to sleep better.

                          In fact, if you aren’t getting enough sleep, your body isn’t getting the time it needs to repair itself; meaning that if you are suffering from an illness, it’s far more likely to linger.

                          As unlikely as it sounds, though, fatigue can sometimes make it difficult to sleep. That’s why I’d recommend taking a look at your bedtime routine before you go to bed and optimize it based on sleep best practices.

                          Here are 3 quick and easy tips for creating a pro-sleep bedtime routine:

                          1. Unplug

                          Many of us try to unwind by watching TV or doing something on an iPhone or tablet. But tech can affect your melatonin production due to the blue light that they emit, fooling your body into thinking it’s still daytime.

                          So turn off all tech one hour before bed and create a tech-free zone in your bedroom.

                          2. Unwind

                          Do something to relax.

                          Use the time before bed to do something you find relaxing such as reading a book, listening to soothing music, meditating or taking an Epsom salt bath.

                          3. Get Comfortable

                          Ensure your bed is comfortable and your room is set up for sleep.

                          Make sure you room is cool. 60-68 degrees is the ideal temperature for most people to sleep.

                          Also, it’s ideal if your bedroom is dark and there is no noise.

                          Finally, make sure everything is handled (e.g., laying out tomorrow’s clothes) before you get into your nice, comfy bed.

                          If your mind is still active, write a to-do list to help you fall asleep faster.[7]

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                          Above all, be gentle with yourself and count your blessings, some sheep or whatever helps.

                          This article also offers practical tips to build a bedtime routine: How to Build a Good Bedtime Routine That Makes Your Morning Easier

                          E — Exercise

                          Many people know that exercise is good for them, but just can’t figure out how to fit it into their busy schedules.

                          That’s what happened in my case.

                          But when my chronic stress and exhaustion turned into systemic inflammation (which can lead to major diseases like Alzheimer’s), I realized it was time to change my lifestyle.

                          As part of my lifestyle upgrade, I knew I needed to move more.

                          My friends who exercise all gave me the same advice: find an exercise you like to do and find a specific time in your schedule when you can consistently do it.

                          That made sense to me.

                          So, I decided to swim.

                          I used to love to swim when I was young, but I hadn’t done it for years. The best time for me to do it was immediately after work, since I could easily get an open swim lane at my local fitness club then.

                          Also, swimming became a nice reason for me to leave work on time. And I got to enjoy a nice workout before eating dinner.

                          Swimming is a good way to get your cardio or endurance training. But, walking, running and dancing are nice alternatives.

                          So find an exercise you love and stick to it. Ideally, get a combination of endurance training, strength training and flexibility training in during your daily 20-minute workout.

                          If you haven’t exercised in a while and have a lot of stress in your life, you may want to give yoga a try because you will increase your flexibility and lower your stress.

                          A — Attitude

                          Stress may be a major reason why you aren’t feeling well all of the time. At least that was the case with me.

                          When I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive, I felt chronically stressed and exhausted. But there was one thing that always worked to help me feel calmer and less fatigued.

                          Do you want to know what that master stress-busting technique was?

                          Breathing.

                          But not just any old breathing. It was a special form of deep Yogic breathing called the “Long-Exhale Breathing” or “4-7-8 breathing” or “Pranayama” in Sanskrit).

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                          Here’s how you do “Long-Exhale Breathing”:

                          1. Sit in a comfortable position with your spine straight and your hand on your tummy (so you know you are breathing deeply from your diaphragm and not shallowly from your chest)
                          2. Breathe in deeply and slowly from your diaphragm with your mouth closed while you count to 4 (ideally until your stomach feels full of air)
                          3. Hold your breath while you count to 7 mentally and enjoy the stillness
                          4. Breathe out through your mouth with a “ha” sound while you count to 8 (or until your stomach has no more air in it)
                          5. Pause after you finish your exhale while you notice the sense of wholeness and relaxation from completing one conscious, deep, long exhale breath
                          6. Repeat 3 times ensuring your exhale is longer than your inhale so you relax your nervous system

                          This type of “long-exhale breathing” is scientifically proven to reduce stress.

                          When your exhale is twice as long as your inhale, it soothes your parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the relaxation response.[8]

                          Plus, this is a great technique for helping you get to sleep, too.

                          N — Nutrition

                          Diet is vital for beating fatigue – after all, food is your main source of energy.

                          If your diet is poor, then it implies you’re not getting the nutrients you need to sustain healthy energy levels.

                          Eating a diet for fatigue doesn’t need to be complicated, time-consuming though.

                          For most people, it’s just a case of swapping a few unhealthy foods for a few healthier ones, like switching from low-fiber, processed foods to whole, high-fiber foods.

                          Unless your current diet is solely made up of fast food and ready meals, adjusting to a fatigue-fighting diet shouldn’t be too much of a shock to the system.

                          Here’re 9 simple diet swaps you can make today:

                          1. Replace your morning coffee with Matcha green tea and drink only herbal tea within six hours of bedtime.
                          2. Add a healthy fat or protein to your any carb you eat, especially if you eat before bed. Please note that carb-only snacks lead to blood-sugar crashes that can make you eat more and they can keep you from sleeping.
                          3. Fill up with fiber especially green leafy vegetables. Strive to get at least 25g per day with at least 5 servings (a serving is the size of your fist) of green vegetables.
                          4. Replace refined, processed, low-fiber pastas and grains with zucchini noodles and whole grains such as buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, oats, amaranth, millet, teff, brown rice and corn.
                          5. Swap natural sweeteners for refined sugars and try to ensure you don’t get more than 25g of sugar a day if you are a woman and 30g of sugar a day if you are a man.
                          6. Replace ice cream with low-sugar alternatives such as So Delicious Dairy-Free Vanilla Bean Coconut Ice Cream.
                          7. Swap omega-6, partially-hydrogenated oils such as corn, palm, sunflower, safflower, cotton, canola and soybean oil for omega-3 oils such as flax, olive and nut oils.
                          8. Replace high-sugar yoghurts with low-sugar, dairy-free yoghurts such as Kite Hill Plain Yoghurt with 1g sugar or Lifeway Farmer Cheese with 0g sugar.
                          9. Swap your sugar-laden soda for sparkling water with a splash of low-sugar juice

                          Also, ensure your diet is giving you enough of the daily essential vitamins and minerals. Most of us don’t get enough Vitamin D, Vitamin B-12, Calcium, Iron and Magnesium. If you are low on any of the above vitamins and minerals, you may experience fatigue and low energy.

                          That’s why it’s always worth having your doctor check your levels. If you find any of them are low, then try to eat foods rich in them.

                          Alternatively, you might consider a high-quality multi-vitamin or specific supplement.

                          The Bottom Line

                          If you are tired of feeling tired, then there is tremendous hope.

                          If you are tired because you are not getting enough high-quality sleep, then the best remedy is a bedtime routine based on sleep best practices.

                          If you are tired because you have stress and fatigue, then the best remedy are four simple lifestyle changes including:

                          • Enough High-Quality Sleep with Bedtime Routine
                          • Regular Exercise You Love
                          • Stress Reduction with Long-Exhale Breathing
                          • Fatigue-Reducing Diet

                          Overall, adopting a healthier lifestyle Is the ideal remedy for feeling more rested and energized.

                          More Tips to Help You Rest Better

                          Featured photo credit: Cris Saur via unsplash.com

                          Reference

                          [1] YouGov: Two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week
                          [2] National Safety Council: Is Your Company Confronting Workplace Fatigue?
                          [3] The New York Times: Why Are We So Freaking Tired?
                          [4] Mayo Clinic: Chronic fatigue syndrome
                          [5] Mayo Clinic: Lack of sleep: Can it make you sick?
                          [6] Ask Dr. Sears: The L.E.A.N. Lifestyle
                          [7] American Psychological Association: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep
                          [8] Yoga International: Learning to Exhale: 2-to-1 Breathing

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