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10 Safety Hacks Every Woman Who Travels Alone Should Know

10 Safety Hacks Every Woman Who Travels Alone Should Know

You’re a woman traveling alone.  Perhaps you’re traveling on business or you’re just finding yourself.  Keep your wits about you and you could have an adventure worth telling.  Here are some dos and don’ts to help you navigate your way through an unfamiliar city and a foreign land.

1. DO wear a wedding ring, even if you’re not married.

An obvious band of gold signifies that you’re not interested and, even more important, that your burly husband is somewhere close by. If you start picking up a weird vibe from someone you’ve just met, the faux, or real, wedding band provides a polite excuse to walk away.

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2. DO travel during the day if at all possible.

You don’t want to be traipsing through a dark parking garage or left hanging around a deserted airport.

3. DO check in with your family, friends, or co-workers as you make your way.

Have them track your flight using an app like Flightaware, so they’ll know when your plane has landed and when they should be hearing from you.  Have a safeword.  Also, have them watch the movie “Taken,” so they can do their best Liam Neeson impression when the kidnappers answer your cellphone.   

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4. DO protect yourself against electronic theft.

It can be thwarted with radio-frequency identification (RFID) blocking shields. Individual RFID shields, wallets, and purses are plentiful. Travelon and Pacsafe carry a full line of items geared toward travel safety, some of which are not only RFID-blocking but also anti-slash. 

5. DON’T flash your cash.

Let’s say you are taking $500 dollars on your physical person as you gambol about the city.  Have small bills in your wallet or shirt pocket for tips and food.  Stash other money in more than one place. Of course, you don’t want to be obvious paying for a cab with the money you pull out of your bra.  Consider carrying a dummy wallet if you’re going to be in a place known for pick-pockets.  Fill it with those promotional credit cards you get in the mail that have your name on them and some small bills so it looks the part.

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6. DO be loud.

Fear can be paralyzing. If you’re not a screamer, carry a Personal Screaming Device (yes, that’s a thing) or the Storm, the world’s loudest whistle.  The Storm is so loud that even someone wearing a helmet can hear it.

7. DON’T offer personal information to people you’ve just met.

In fact, it’s a good idea to have a plausible, but completely fictional, story to tell those who are overly curious.  And, not to sound too paranoid, but while you may be talking to someone who genuinely is who they say they are, the guy behind you is making notes of your travel plans.

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8. DON’T drink the water.

Bottled water is always safest and probably better tasting.  If you like the taste of   radium-228, arsenic and lead with your tap water (I’m looking at you Las Vegas) drink up. Tap water is fine if it’s properly filtered.  But even filtered water tends to miss that pesky E coli or rotavirus, so consider a travel water bottle with a purifier.  

9. DON’T get drunk.

Intoxication reduces not only your inhibitions, but your awareness of your surroundings. That’s when predatory drugs (roofies, liquid ecstasy and, yes, cat valiums) can get slipped into your beverage. 

10. DON’T dress to impress.

To travel safely in a foreign country, you will probably fail at blending in, so aim for not standing out.  To make packing easier on you, choose a versatile wardrobe with a pick a neutral-based color scheme of non-wrinkly clothes.  Black/white/grey/blue-toned charcoal—those are all easy to mix and match.  Keep your bling at home.  A woman alone doesn’t have to travel in constant fear.  The best travel safety tip is to look like you know what you’re doing.  Lost often comes off as weak or vulnerable. Walk with determination and purpose.  Don’t fumble for things. If you have to pick a stranger to ask for help, choose a family with young children  or an older woman.  Such choices are less likely to be serial killers in disguise.  Research where you’re going.  The CIA World Factbook is a great resource.  Realize that, in a worst case scenario, bad things happen no matter how many precautions you take. Your job is to reduce the chance that those bad things will happen to you.

Featured photo credit: Dalicia in Florence via facebook.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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