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10 Non-cliche Places To Travel In Your 20s

10 Non-cliche Places To Travel In Your 20s

Travel is increasingly becoming synonymous with busy crowds, jaded tourists and disgruntled locals. However, there’s always a flip side. As travel is becoming relatively cheaper, faster and more convenient, there are places that are emerging off the grid of traditional travel locations.

You’re in your 20s: you’re young enough to want to go and explore the unseen wonders of the world; you’re old enough to use your own money; you’re (relatively) free; you’re not tied down. You won’t get to relive this decade again. So here are 10 of the hidden gems that you could aim to visit.

1. South Luangwa National Park, Zambia

Zambia's bea

    This is a tranquil haven that is home to an embarrassingly diverse array of wildlife. Thronging with big game, little game and about 400 different species of birds, this 9059 kmgem of a park provides a retreat for weary travellers. For the more adventurous there are activities such as the walking safaris that can bring you face to face with a herd of lumbering elephants. For the more mild-hearted enjoy the sunset with an Amarula at a rustic campsite or luxury lodge.

    2. Ahmedabad, India

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    Uttarayan dky

      Throbbing with colour and diversity like most of India, Ahmedabad is the largest city in the state of Gujarat. It is especially vibrant during days of festivals and traditions. Popular ones include Uttarayan, a day of kite-flying and the 9 days of Navaratri, which marks the end of harvest season. Pay a visit to Sabarmati Ashram,a former home of Mahatma Ghandi, or absorb the bustling markets while inhaling the delicious smells of fried snacks as the blood-red sun sets above you.

      3. Shikoku, Japan

      japan34

        Like most of Japan, Shikoku has a rich cultural heritage. Unlike most of Japan, Shikoku is not frequented by hoards of tourists that throng towards the country’s urban metropolises. Shikoku is known for being home to the bathhouse that was featured in Hayao Miyazaki’s Oscar winning animation “Spirited Away.” There are all the monuments and buildings that you’d expect from feudal Japan: shrines, luxurious gardens, old castles and the oldest Kabuki theatre in Japan.

        4. Baku, Azerbaijan

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          Baku is a mishmash of the old and new and the East and West. The old city is a UNESCO World Heritage site with ancient Persian influences visible in the narrow alleyways and intricate stone facades of old mosques. The new city co-exists in complete contrast to the old city which it stands beside. It is an emerging hub of economic and cultural activity that exists as a collection of beautiful contradictions.

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          5. Dead Sea, Jordan and Israel

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            The Dead Sea is said to be the lowest point on Earth. The saline waters are famously unconducive for marine life, but the salts allow for extreme buoyancy when swimming. The minerals found in the water are also deemed beneficial for general well-being. The historical riches are plenty: Christianity, Islam and Judaism anchored early roots in the region, as befits the haunting beauty of the place.

            6. Lobito Bay, Angola

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              The bay is a long stretch of land that protrudes defiantly into the Atlantic Ocean. Lobito was established as a port municipality, dating back to the days of Portuguese rule. This is evident in the architectural designs of the old churches and forts. As well as the history, the coastal town attracts anglers and water sport enthusiasts.

              7. La Paz, Bolivia

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              La_Paz-Calle_Jaen (1)

                La Paz is nestled neatly in between the craggy mountains of the Andes. If the view doesn’t knock the breath from your lungs, the staggering altitude of 3,000m + will. Wander around and explore the churches that date back two centuries ago or through the Witches’ market that sells all manner of things.

                8. Timore-Leste

                Timore Leste

                  Despite being the youngest city in Asia, and its tumultuous history, Timor-Leste has a quiet beauty made up of rugged cliffs and buttery beaches. You can wander through the tropical rainforest vegetation or go for long hikes along the coast or just take in the scenery from the top of a rolling hill.

                  9. Dunhuang, China

                  Dunhuang

                    Dunhuang is located along the well-trodden route of the ancient Silk Road in the province of Gansu. The city boasts historical buildings that pay tribute to the travellers that chose to settle here. The Crescent Lake and Buddhist Caves are popular attractions. The slightly eerie sound of the wind slicing into the sand dunes is ubiquitous among old and new travellers to the city.

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                    10. Bay of Fires, Tasmania, Australia

                    Bay_of_Fires

                      Bay of Fires is an outdoor-enthusiasts paradise. The picturesque turquoise waters and beaches belong on a postcard. The flame-coloured granite rocks break up the otherwise traditional ocean view. You can go on a guided tour that takes you on an exploration of the area.

                      Featured photo credit: Raisa Ismail via facebook.com

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                      Last Updated on June 18, 2019

                      15 Ways to Cultivate Continuous Learning for a Sharper Brain

                      15 Ways to Cultivate Continuous Learning for a Sharper Brain

                      Assuming the public school system didn’t crush your soul, learning is a great activity. It expands your viewpoint. It gives you new knowledge you can use to improve your life. It is important for your personal growth. Even if you discount the worldly benefits, the act of learning can be a source of enjoyment.

                      “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” — Mark Twain

                      But in a busy world, it can often be hard to fit in time to learn anything that isn’t essential. The only things learned are those that need to be. Everything beyond that is considered frivolous. Even those who do appreciate the practice of lifelong learning, can find it difficult to make the effort.

                      Here are some tips for installing the habit of contiuous learning:

                      1. Always have a book

                      It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or a week to read a book. Always strive to have a book that you are reading through, and take it with you so you can read it when you have time.

                      Just by shaving off a few minutes in-between activities in my day I can read about a book per week. That’s at least fifty each year.

                      2. Keep a “To-Learn” List

                      We all have to-do lists. These are the tasks we need to accomplish. Try to also have a “to-learn” list. On it you can write ideas for new areas of study.

                      Maybe you would like to take up a new language, learn a skill or read the collective works of Shakespeare. Whatever motivates you, write it down.

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                      3. Get More Intellectual Friends

                      Start spending more time with people who think. Not just people who are smart, but people who actually invest much of their time in learning new skills. Their habits will rub off on you.

                      Even better, they will probably share some of their knowledge with you.

                      4. Guided Thinking

                      Albert Einstein once said,

                      “Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.”

                      Simply studying the wisdom of others isn’t enough, you have to think through ideas yourself. Spend time journaling, meditating or contemplating over ideas you have learned.

                      5. Put it Into Practice

                      Skill based learning is useless if it isn’t applied. Reading a book on C++ isn’t the same thing as writing a program. Studying painting isn’t the same as picking up a brush.

                      If your knowledge can be applied, put it into practice.

                      In this information age, we’re all exposed to a lot of information, it’s important to re-learn how to learn so as to put the knowledge into practice.

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                      6. Teach Others

                      You learn what you teach. If you have an outlet of communicating ideas to others, you are more likely to solidify that learning.

                      Start a blog, mentor someone or even discuss ideas with a friend.

                      7. Clean Your Input

                      Some forms of learning are easy to digest, but often lack substance.

                      I make a point of regularly cleaning out my feed reader for blogs I subscribe to. Great blogs can be a powerful source of new ideas. But every few months, I realize I’m collecting posts from blogs that I am simply skimming.

                      Every few months, purify your input to save time and focus on what counts.

                      8. Learn in Groups

                      Lifelong learning doesn’t mean condemning yourself to a stack of dusty textbooks. Join organizations that teach skills.

                      Workshops and group learning events can make educating yourself a fun, social experience.

                      9. Unlearn Assumptions

                      You can’t add water to a full cup. I always try to maintain a distance away from any idea. Too many convictions simply mean too few paths for new ideas.

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                      Actively seek out information that contradicts your worldview.

                      Our minds can’t be trusted, but this is what we can do about it to be wiser.

                      10. Find Jobs that Encourage Learning

                      Pick a career that encourages continual learning. If you are in a job that doesn’t have much intellectual freedom, consider switching to one that does.

                      Don’t spend forty hours of your week in a job that doesn’t challenge you.

                      11. Start a Project

                      Set out to do something you don’t know how. Forced learning in this way can be fun and challenging.

                      If you don’t know anything about computers, try building one. If you consider yourself a horrible artist, try a painting.

                      12. Follow Your Intuition

                      Lifelong learning is like wandering through the wilderness. You can’t be sure what to expect and there isn’t always an end goal in mind.

                      Letting your intuition guide you can make self-education more enjoyable. Most of our lives have been broken down to completely logical decisions, that making choices on a whim has been stamped out.

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                      13. The Morning Fifteen

                      Productive people always wake up early. Use the first fifteen minutes of your morning as a period for education.

                      If you find yourself too groggy, you might want to wait a short time. Just don’t put it off later in the day where urgent activities will push it out of the way.

                      14. Reap the Rewards

                      Learn information you can use. Understanding the basics of programming allows me to handle projects that other people would require outside help. Meeting a situation that makes use of your educational efforts can be a source of pride.

                      15 .Make Learning a Priority

                      Few external forces are going to persuade you to learn. The desire has to come from within. Once you decide you want to make lifelong learning a habit, it is up to you to make it a priority in your life.

                      In fact, you can train your brain to crave lifelong learning! Here’s how to become a lifelong learner:

                      How to Train Your Brain to Crave Lifelong Learning (And Why It’s Good)

                      More Resources About Continuous Learning

                      Featured photo credit: Paul Schafer via unsplash.com

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