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10 Interface Typos You’re Probably Making

10 Interface Typos You’re Probably Making

Whether you are a master of the written word or someone who struggles to transfer their thoughts into print, it is all too easy to overlook simple errors when typing. This is why the spell-checker has become such a widely use tool, as it enables writers to easily evaluate or edit their work.

Have you ever thought to take a look at the mistakes that your spell-checker picks up ? Chances are, you’re repeating the same mistakes over and over again, and relying on technology to ensure that you produce well-written and cohesive work.

With this in mind, it is worth taking a look at the most common interface typos and exploring the issues that cause us to confuse separate words. Consider the following:

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1. Login and Log In

This is one of the most common typos, and it is not helped by the fact that numerous websites often confuse these two entirely different entities. While a reputable site, such as Facebook, use both ‘Log In’ and ‘Login’ in their correct form, for example, others confuse the two and often use them inappropriately. Essentially, the term ‘Log In’ is the verb form and should therefore be used to invite online users to access their unique accounts, while ‘Login’ is and noun and refers to your individual access details.

2. Setup and Set Up

On a similar note, the terms ‘Setup’ and ‘Set Up’ also serve as common noun and verb confusions. In this instance, ‘Setup’ refers to a specific scenario, while ‘Set-Up’ is a call to action that directs individuals to establish an account, connection or unique set of circumstances. Online websites and resources are also known to confuse these similar words, but it is important that clear direction is given to their users and new visitors. You should also understand the subtle difference between ‘Sign Up’ and ‘Set Up’ in relation to an online account, as the latter will usually be part of a longer application process.

3. Right-Click and Right Click

The use of hyphenated words can often alleviate confusion, but only if you understand their initial purpose and origin. Hyphens are used to link words or individual syllables of words, most commonly in compound phrases that have a combined or dual meaning. In this instance, ‘Right-Click’ instructs online users to press the secondary button on their mouse while highlighting a file icon, and the simple application of a hyphen removes any ambiguity from the direction. In an age where time is precious, the value of adhering to such small details cannot be ignored.

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4. Free and for Free

This is an interesting one, as you will often see businesses and websites advertising something ‘for free’ as part of a promotional campaign. This is technically categorized as colloquial rather than correct use of the English language, however, and those with an attention to detail would always say ‘get one free’ rather than ‘get one for free.’ On a fundamental level, you can either purchase something for a predetermined price or get something free, but never an amalgamation of the two.

5. Everyday and Every Day

As anyone who writes creatively can testify, this particular typo is a source of great confusion. The former is basically an adjective phrase, which refers to an action or product that is commonplace and entirely normal. In contrast, the term ‘Every Day’ should be used when referencing something that occurs with relentless monotony over every 24-hour period. This is perhaps one of the most common interface typos that you can make, especially if you write sparingly or are not familiar with the vagaries of the English language.

6. Instore and In Store

Following a similar theme, this typo adheres to the same rules as ‘Everyday’ and ‘Every Day’. Most commonly used by businesses and retailers who operate both offline and online, the term ‘Instore’ should be used to refer to promotional offers that are only available to physical shops and outlets. In contrast, these firms may also suggest that they ‘have great discounts and promotions in store’ for customers who choose to take up a specific offer. This is often misunderstood, however, especially by businesses who operated without a dedicated marketing team.

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7. Discount on and Discount Off

We are now entering the realm of confusing interface typos that are actually quite rare, simply because the terms and phrases in question are less widely used. Although ‘Discount On’ can be used legitimately to describe how a specific promotional offer has been applied, ‘Discount Off’ is technically inaccurate and may even be described by some as a double-negative. This is because the word ‘discount’ relates to a deduction from a predetermined cost or price point, which in turn renders the use of the word ‘off’ completely redundant in every conceivable instance.

8. Email and eBook

If you are a regular user of the Internet, you will often see words such as ‘Email’ and ‘eBook’ capitalized regardless of their precise application. While this type of fixed capitalization is fine for branded items or nouns, however, it cannot be applied to less well-defined words or on a completely random basis. As email and ebook are not officially nouns, they should only ever have their first letter capitalized in instances when they are used to start a sentence.

9. iPhone and IPhone

As we live in the defining age of technological advancement, it seems only right to include a typo that has only originated during the last six years. This common misprint refers to Apple’s ground-breaking iPhone device, which continues to dominate the smartphone market in 2014 and if often spelled with a capital ‘I’. This is an especially common mistake when the word is used at the beginning of a sentence, but the fact remains that it should be written and presented in a uniform manner regardless of its exact application.  This is because the iPhone is a branded product, and its spelling is therefore dictated by the innovator behind it.

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10. There and Their

Another pair of words that sound identical when spoken, these two entities have entirely different meanings and applications. Despite this, however, they are often confused and commonly used in each other’s place due to error. In fact, the difference between them is relatively simple, as while ‘There’ is used to identify a specific place or location ‘Their’ describes something that belongs to an individual or group. This misunderstanding has plagued even established writers, while it is also easy to overlook such a mistake as not all spell-checking tools differentiate between the two.

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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