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10 Differences Between Dog Lovers And Cat Lovers

10 Differences Between Dog Lovers And Cat Lovers

A tale as old as time: cat lovers pitted against dog lovers in a battle over who’s really got life figured out. Assumptions have been made and stereotypes created in attempts to settle the score in the past, but science has come to the rescue to set the record straight. The definitive answer? Well, it’s still a bit biased depending on your stance. Why? Because just like they do in pet preference, cat and dog lovers seek and prefer different qualities in life and relationships than dog people. In a study of 600 college students, researchers found that each group shared similar (maybe controversial) characteristics according to their furry friend of choice. Allow me to explain with a list of the 10 most significant differences between dog lovers and cat lovers that were pulled from this study!

1. Dog lovers listen

Not too surprisingly, dog people tended to be more obedient in nature. According to an article in the Huffington Post, dog lovers “followed the rules more closely”, while cat lovers “tended to be non-conformists, preferring to be expedient rather than follow the rules”. Those of you who’ve ever tried to call your cat to you when you have company over probably understand this one.

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2. Cat lovers are smart

This is where things get controversial. In the study, cat people scored higher on the test of intelligence than dog people. While this doesn’t necessarily hold true to all people in each group, higher intelligence test scores tended to fall within the cat-people category.

3. Dog lovers keep things lively

Live Science’s article on this same study also noted that dog people were more lively. Meaning that they were friendlier and more energetic. Cat people, on the other hand, didn’t seem to carry the same qualities as frequently in the study.

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4. Cat lovers keep an open mind

As with the intelligence finding, this doesn’t necessarily mean that dog owners are the opposite. Rather, cat people were more consistently found to be a bit more open minded than were the dog lovers. This was based on general appreciation of art, unusual ideas, adventure, and an overall sense of curiosity and experience.

5. Dog lovers love people

It’s no secret, cats can be a bit standoffish. In this same way, their owners tend to be less outgoing as well. Dog owners, however, were found to enjoy the company of others more. A potential reason for this was offered by the Huffington Post, noting that the lifestyle of a dog owner is a bit more active to begin with as owners take their pets outside and to parks where they have more opportunity to socialize with others.

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6. Cat lovers seek affection, dog lovers look for companionship

Maybe not so surprising but interestingly noted in the Live Science article was that cat people seek affection from their pets while dog people were more after companionship. Study researcher Denise Guastello notes on this that “It’s possible that people may select pets based on their own personality. For example, cats are often seen as independent animals that keep to themselves, and are cautious of others.”

7. Cat lovers are sensitive

Often times, people see sensitivity as a bad thing. This isn’t necessarily the case. Cat people were found to be more sensitive in this study, while dog owners showed fewer signs of sensitivity in provided tests.

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8. Dog lovers represent a larger portion of people

Live Science reported that 60% of study respondents said they preferred dogs while just 11% reported a preference for cats (the rest said they either like both animals equally or didn’t like either animal). Looks like dog owners win the popularity vote!

9. Cat lovers prefer solitude

According to research reported by Modern Dog magazine, cat owners were one third more likely to live alone and twice as likely to live in an apartment or flat. Dog ownership was more closely related to living in a house with a spouse and/or family members.

10. Dog lovers are dominant

In the same study reported on by Modern Dog magazine, researchers noted that cat owners tended to possess fewer qualities associated with dominance than dog owners. These qualities included assertiveness, self-confidence, forcefulness, and persistence.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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