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What’s Your List Type?

What’s Your List Type?
List

    Like a lot of productivity geeks, I love lists. Lists are what keep us sane during those crazy project filled days (or keep us from doing any real work). Just google “make a list for productivity” and check out the results.

    One thing I’ve found interesting is that most folks tend to fall into 4 distinct types of list makers. Now, like most type profiles, there is some overlap, and some have more than one. But a few months back, I began keeping an eye on how different people make lists. What I found is that the real productivity boost comes from identifying what type of list you prefer, and using it to your advantage.

    For example, I know a lot of people who love mind-mapping. But I hate it. I know, that’s blasphemy to some, but it just doesn’t work for me. I’ve struggled for years to make it work. As an artist, it just made sense that mind-mapping would be my preferred way of capturing information. Conversely, I worked with a very detailed, analytic type guy who loved mind-mapping. Every other area of his life was very rigid and straight-laced. But when he made notes, his mind-maps were a thing of beauty. Controlled chaos you might say.

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    So I began taking a look at how different people make lists, and how they fall into 4 broad categories – lister, mapper, clumper, and jotter. Now keep in mind, there is nothing scientific about this. It’s based solely on my own observations. But every person I’ve worked with and applied a list type to found that it fit them – and that they had always been that way.

    The Lister

    The most common type is the straight list down the page – the lister. Bullets or checkboxes may vary, but listers usually prefer an orderly grocery-list style.

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    The Mapper

    Mind-maps are a very popular style of capturing and organizing information. Some strict mind-mappers wouldn’t even consider them a list. But the basic elements are there – organized information, put in a format to easy digest.

    The Clumper

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    Similar to a map style, a clumper tends to put info all over the page, with specific groupings. Notes on one topic in one area, to-dos in another, but all set out in clearly defined “clumps” throughout the page.

    The Jotter

    Jotters tend to just throw info on a page in no easily discernible order. But being a jotter myself, I know that there is some order to the randomness (a paradox, you could say). Jotters like the undefined structure, which allows for lots of different types of information to be captured at once.

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    And You?

    Which type best fits you? Do you have a list style that you’ve had most of your life, or have you grown and changed over the years? Just like any type exercise, knowing the basic archetype of our habits and work-style is extremely valuable in helping us be more productive. By learning something as simple as how you prefer to make lists, you can save a bunch of time messing around with things that don’t work. Then the next time some smart-ass says “you know, you really should mind-map your notes,” you can tell them “no, thanks, I’m a clumper.” Then don’t tell them what it means. Because a confused smart-ass is a fun thing to watch.

    Tony D. Clark writes, draws cartoons, designs software and websites, and spends a lot of time talking others into working from home, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest focuses on helping parents who want to do meaningful work from home and have more time for their families, and their dreams.

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    Leon Ho

    Founder of Lifehack

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    Last Updated on July 13, 2020

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

    Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

    Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

    Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

    Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

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    1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

    Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

    So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

    Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

    If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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    2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

    This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

    Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

    3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

    Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

    For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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    4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

    Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

    These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

    5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

    Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

    For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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    Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

    6. Schedule Your To-Dos

    Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

    Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

    7. Review Your Progress

    At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

    Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

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    Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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