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Review: Steelcase Leap Office Chair

Review: Steelcase Leap Office Chair

The office chair is one piece of furniture most of us spend most of our time in whether it’s at the office or even at home. Given the amount of time spent on one, it’s probably a good idea to find an office chair that’s both supportive and comfortable to get you through your day.

The Steelcase Leap is one of those ergonomic office chairs.  At first glance, it appears to be your typical office chair, nothing eye catching about it if you compare it to the similarly priced and popular Herman Miller Aeron chairs.  But when you plant yourself in the Leap, you discover how comfortable the chair really is and the many ergonomic features it offers.

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Steelcase Leap features

    The Leap test unit sent to us from Steelcase was in black leather with an aluminum base.  The chair has all the ergonomic features you can ask for in an office chair, from the comfy seat cushion all the way down to the smooth rolling casters.

    Here are a few ergonomic features perfect for any office professionals:

    Adjustable arms:
    This is a pretty standard feature on all office chairs, but the Leap made it so the arms can telescope in and out, move forward and back, side to side, pivot at an angle and adjusts up and down.  You’ll be sure to find a comfortable position.

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    Upper back force:
    You don’t get the springy, bouncy feeling of other office chairs when you recline.  There’s added pressure that makes for a smooth recline. The adjustments found in the Leap lets you customize the right amount of reclining support.

    Natural Glide System:
    What’s great with this feature is when you recline, the seat moves along forward, easy on your spine and your buttocks for the duration of your workday.

    Adjustable seat depth:
    Whatever your body size, you can adjust the seat to accommodate your body and still be comfortable.

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    Lower back firmness:
    Any time you spend a good portion of your day at a chair, your lower back will tell you that it needs some support.  This feature allows you to adjust the firmness to keep your lower back feeling good by maintaining that natural curve.

    Leap pictures

      For the past couple months testing this chair, I’ve been literally glued to it because it’s that comfortable.  I actually found myself shifting less while testing the chair and my posture has improved ever so slightly.  While the chair offers a lot and I found all of their features useful, I didn’t like a couple minor things with the chair, all related to the lumbar support. I thought they could have extended the firmness range to allow for an even firmer support to the lower back. Another thing was the levers for the adjustable lumbar height, the sliding action was not as smooth as it can be and at times, I was able to set the lumbar support unevenly. Also, I thought the (build quality of) levers felt a bit out of place with the rest of the adjustment levers/handles.

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      For office professionals who are looking for a luxurious ergonomic office chair, this is one of them. All the features and benefits mentioned does not come without a price tag.  This particular chair we tested is priced at USD$1649 from Steelcase online store.  Steelcase does offer other models with different fabrics and finish that start at USD $849, also from their online store.

      Prices aside for a moment and think about where you spend most of your day in the office, it’s safe to say that most would agree it’s at a desk, in a chair (bet you’re sitting on one right now, reading Lifehack).  If you are looking to make improvements at the office, you might want to consider adding a good ergonomic office chair.  It could be good for your body as well as the work you produce.

      Steelcase also offers a good animation to help with illustrating how all these ergonomic features would function if you are unable to test it in person.

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      Last Updated on July 13, 2020

      How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

      How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

      Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

      Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

      Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

      Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

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      1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

      Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

      So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

      Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

      If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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      2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

      This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

      Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

      3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

      Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

      For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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      4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

      Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

      These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

      5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

      Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

      For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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      Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

      6. Schedule Your To-Dos

      Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

      Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

      7. Review Your Progress

      At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

      Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

      More Tips for Achieving Goals

      Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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