Advertising

Review on The Best Life Hacks of 2005

Advertising
Review on The Best Life Hacks of 2005

The phrase Life Hacks has been used for nearly two years now, but 2005 is the year that everyone seeks to learn more hacks to increase their productivity in life. Time is just not enough and everyone wants to best use of their time. Getting Things Done was the hottest topic in 2005. During June-July 2005, Techorati reported that David Allen’s Getting Things Done book was the most talked book on the Net. Then there were introduction of new ways of managing tasks and PIM, including new online planning application. People were trying to figure out different ways of using paper organizers – even making their own paper templates and print them out whenever they run out of pages.


Paper based organizer won the popularity battle in 2005. Online organizer is still waiting for its moment when everyone has Internet access on the run. Electronic based organizer has its own place – the release of GTDTiddlyWiki created a hit around the Internet. People were amazed on how portable it is and how easy to update data because it is Wiki based.

Advertising

Then, we created some trends on the sleeping cycle. Bloggers have started to look into it, including our friend Steve Pavlina has tried and it works for him.

How to manage yourself and work with others? Management was a big topic in 2005 and it will continue its place among Life Hacks topics. No matter if you are working for others or a manager – You will be effective when you know how to communicate, motivate yourself and others, handle tasks and self-manage yourself.

Advertising

We also covered different topics that were trends around the Net – introducing some quick hacks and tips on audio book, cooking, writing, and software.

When I was compiling the best posts of 2005 in Lifehack.org, I was amazed we have already passed 700 posts mark. I am thrilled to see how far lifehack.org has gone so far. During 2005, my priority has been changed personally and profressionally and I am so happy lifehack.org is still running and supported by many people everyday.

Advertising

To select the best posts, It would be a difficult task if you ask me to select the best among those posts by hand. For now, I have selected the top 23 of the most popular posts, based on visits, trackback and comments. Here you go, the most popular lifehack.org posts of 2005:

  1. Fifty (50!) Tools which can help you in Writing
  2. Essential List and Resources on Firefox Extensions
  3. 150 Tips and Tricks on Cleaning
  4. Over 100 Quick and Easy Healthy Foods
  5. 9 Tips in Life that Lead to Happiness
  6. Essential Resources for Google Maps
  7. Fifty Essential Topics on Economics
  8. How to Download Google Video
  9. 20 Things They don’t want you to know
  10. Cooking 101: 20 Lessons to kick start your cooking skill
  11. Permission to Suck
  12. 6 Reasons on Why are You Procrastinating
  13. Getting Things Done (GTD) with Mac and Palm
  14. PocketMod: Flash Generating Paper Organizer
  15. “But I Can’t…”
  16. How to Stop Worrying
  17. GTD on Yahoo! Calendar
  18. Who needs a PDA when I’ve got paper?
  19. The Importance of Daily and Weekly Planning
  20. The Forgotten Power of Conversation
  21. Information List of Polyphasic Sleep
  22. 7 Steps to Help you Better in Writing
  23. The Passion of the Craft

This is probably the last post of the year if there aren’t any breaking news. Thank you everyone for their support in 2005! I wish all readers 2006 will be the best and most productive year. My new year resolution is to continue my journey of improving myself, and keep Lifehack.org running as long as I can. Remember the 12 self-management checklist we have introduced this week? To help you achieving your new year resolution, I encourage you to make a public commitment here by dropping down into the comment below, if you feel comfortable on doing so.

Advertising

Lifehack.org will see you next year!

More by this author

Leon Ho

Founder of Lifehack

Book summary: A Technique for Producing Ideas 10 Ways to Extend Laptop Battery Life Bob Parsons on His 16 Rules for Survival Free note taking templates and techniques Fifty Essential Topics on Economics

Trending in Lifehack

1 Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords 2 Lifehack Reviews: 50 Best Life Hacks for Your Life 3 Best Life Hack Sites – 100 Most Useful Websites on The Internet 4 80 How-To Sites Worth Bookmarking 5 20 Unusual Uses for Coca-Cola That You’ve Never Considered

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 25, 2021

Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

Advertising
Protecting Your Online Life With Secure Passwords

With all of the recent online services and companies falling under attack to hackers in the past few months, it seems only fitting to talk about password creation and management. There are a lot of resources out there discussing this, but it never hurts to revisit this topic time and again because of its importance.

Password management isn’t necessarily a difficult thing to do, yet it does seem like a bit of an annoyance to most people. When it comes to password management, you will hear the famous line, “I don’t really care about changing my passwords regularly. I have nothing important online anyways.” Let’s see if you have nothing important online when your PayPal account gets taken over because you thought the password “password” was good enough.

In my opinion, it is an “internet user’s” responsibility to make sure that they keep secure passwords and update them on a regular basis. In this article we will discuss how to make your online presence more secure and keep it secure.

The easy fundamentals

First thing is first; creating a strong password.

Advertising

A strong password is a mixture of alpha-numeric characters and symbols, has a good length (hopefully 15 characters or longer), and doesn’t necessarily represent some word or phrase. If the service you are signing up for doesn’t allow passwords over a certain length, like 8 characters, always use the maximum length.

Here are some examples of strong passwords:
* i1?,2,2\1′(:-%Y
* ZQ5t0466VC44PmJ
* mp]K{ dCFKVplGe]PBm1mKdinLSOoa (30 characters)

And not so good examples
* sammy1234
* password123
* christopher

You can check out PC Tools Password Generator here. This is a great way to make up some very strong passwords. Of course the more random passwords are harder to remember, but that is where password management comes into play.

Advertising

Managing your passwords

I know some people that keep their passwords in an unencrypted text file. That’s not a good idea. I suppose that if you aren’t doing much online and are decent at avoiding viruses and such, it could be OK, but I would never recommend it.

So, where do you keep your strong passwords for all the services that you visit on a daily basis?

There are a ton of password safes out there including KeePass, RoboForm, Passpack, Password Safe, LastPass, and 1Password. If and when I recommend any of these I always count on LastPass and 1Password.

Both LastPass and 1Password offer different entry types for online services logins (PayPal, Twitter, Facebook, Gmail, etc.), credit cards and bank accounts, online identities, and other types of sensitive information. Both have excellent reviews and only differ in a few subtle ways. One of the ways that is more notable is that LastPass keeps your encrypted password Vault online where 1Password allows you to keep it locally or shared through Dropbox. Either way, you are the holder of the encryption keys and both ways are very secure.

Advertising

LastPass and 1Password both offer cross-platform support as well as support for Android and iOS (LastPass even has BlackBerry support). 1Password is a little pricey ($39.99 for either Windows or Mac) where LastPass has free options as well as premium upgrades that allow for mobile syncing.

Upkeep

You should probably change your passwords for your “important” accounts at least every 6 weeks. When I say “important” accounts I am referring to ones that you just couldn’t imagine losing access to. For me that would be Gmail, PayPal, eBay, Amazon, all my FTP accounts and hosting accounts, Namecheap, etc. Basically these include any account where financial information could be lost or accessed as well as accounts that could be totally screwed up (like my webserver).

There is no hard and fast rule to how often you should change your passwords, but 6 to 8 weeks should be pretty good.

Alternatives

You may think that all of this is just too much to manage on a daily basis. I will admit it is kind of annoying to have to change your passwords and use a password manager on a daily basis. For those people out there that don’t want to go through all of the hub-bub of super-secure, encrypted, password management, here are a few tips to keep you safe:

Advertising

  1. Create a unique and hard to guess “base password” and then a pattern to use for each site you logon onto. For instance a base password could be “Ih2BaSwAa” (this stands for “I have two brothers and sisters who are annoying”). Then you would add something “site specific” to the end of it. For Twitter Ih2BaSwAaTWTTR, Facebook Ih2BaSwAaFCBK, etc. This is sort of unsecure, but probably more secure than 99% of the passwords out there.
  2. Don’t write your passwords down in public places. If you want to keep track of passwords on something written, keep it on you at least. The problem is that if you get your wallet stolen you are still out of luck.
  3. Don’t use the same passwords for every service. I’m not even going to explain this; just don’t do it.

These are just a few things that can be done rather than keeping your passwords in a management system. Personally, with over 100 entries in my password management system, I couldn’t even dream of doing any other way. But those out there with only a few passwords, having a simpler system may be beneficial.

So, if you want to be a “responsible internet citizen” or you just don’t want to lose your precious account data, then creating and maintaining strong passwords for your online accounts is a must.

Read Next