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Productivity: Pick a Small Corner

Productivity: Pick a Small Corner

I was marveling over a new friend’s site, Big Bottom, which is not about that, potty brain. It’s about bass players. Musicians. Take something as big as music, and specialize down to bass players. It’s brilliant. The idea is small enough to drive very specific traffic, and yet large enough to include a lot of people who can appreciate the idea.

So how’d Dale do it? He picked a small corner, and went to work.

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Applied to Life Hacking

There are LOTS of jobs that just look too daunting when you view the whole thing. Dishes piled high in the sink after a party always look 300 times higher than they are. Writing a novel sounds horrible when you consider all 300 pages that have to be written. You can go another way and say that just blanket saying, “write a novel!” is too big a thing. Jason Fried preaches about the beauty of constraints all the time at 37 Signals, right?

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Pick a Small Corner

In GTD terms, this is pretty much Next Action space. But perhaps this is kind of like completing a series of Next Actions without trying to look too hard at the bigger picture. Just accept that it’s out there, and believe that what you’re about to do is going to move that goal along eventually, but squint about it. Don’t think too hard. Just go into doing.

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  • Accept that the project is big. Just do this first thing.
  • Accept that this first thing is complex. Just take the first step.
  • Accept that failure might come early. Stop. Take a breath. Go.
  • Set tiny goals, very tiny goals. (When I started running, I’d say all throughout the run, “I’m going to stop at that tree up there. That’s totally where I’m gonna stop. Okay, you can stop there,” I’d say to myself. When I got really close, I’d say, “Forget it. I’m already here. But I’m only going to run as far as that tree, then.” )
  • Don’t stop to pat yourself on the back. Notch the milestone, and move forward.
  • If you lose focus, say out loud, “Small corner.” Say it again.
  • Finish as much as you can manage, celebrate what you’ve done, and try moving to something else for just a minute.
  • Come back and do more. You can pull off tons of false stops and move things forward.

On that higher level, picking a small corner means understanding that there’s lots that you could do, and that it becomes a matter of taking a look at the larger chaos, squinting, and then narrowing your goal down to that one thing that you think you can accomplish as a small corner goal. Remember that constraints — especially those that are self-imposed — are good for helping you move foward. (I use constraints in building processes for myself and my new business).

Let me know what you think of this one. Personally, I think learning how to execute the small bits is what gives you confidence to pull off the larger plays. We’d love your feedback.

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Chris Brogan writes about self-improvement and creativity at [chrisbrogan.com], when he’s not appreciating Big Bottom (the website, silly!)

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Last Updated on July 13, 2020

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

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1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

6. Schedule Your To-Dos

Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

7. Review Your Progress

At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

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Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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