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How to Get Great Sleep

How to Get Great Sleep

In modern life, we usually get robbed by our commitments and other demands in our life. We tends to sleep less and less. It maybe your worry that prevents your sleep, or you got insomnia. Psychology Today has a great info on how to get great sleep. It addresses couple of good info or concerns on getting little sleep. The article has full of information. This is quite interesting to note these most alerting and sleepiest time:

… Circadian rhythm guides the body through cycles of sleep and alertness. Ironically, it issues its strongest alerting force in a burst lasting from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., perfect for dinner-party repartee (although you may not remember the bon mots — short-term memory is sharpest around 7 in the morning). After 8 p.m., alertness begins to fade, permitting us to doze off. This same system makes us sleepiest in the early morning, from 4 a.m. to 6 a.m. Stay up all night studying for an exam and circadian forces will make you drowsy near dawn. Stick it out for two more hours, though, and you'll start picking up steam again. “You don't need sleep to actually get alert,” Spielman points out…

How to Get Great Sleep – [Psychology Today]

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Published on January 27, 2020

The Lifehack Show: How Exercise Slows Aging with Judy Foreman

The Lifehack Show: How Exercise Slows Aging with Judy Foreman

In this episode of the Lifehack Show, we'll be talking with Judy Foreman about the major impact exercise has on aging, both physically and mentally.

Judy is a nationally syndicated health columnist who has won more than 50 journalism awards. She received a Master’s degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and was a Fellow in Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. Judy is also author of A Nation in Pain: Healing our Biggest Health Problem and The Global Pain Crisis: What Everyone Needs to Know.

Her newest book Exercise is Medicine: How Physical Activity Boosts Health and Slows Aging debunks some common myths about aging and shows that it is possible to reverse the effects we often think of as inevitable.

    Featured photo credit: Anupam Mahapatra via unsplash.com

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