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Get the Most Out of Travel

Get the Most Out of Travel

For a business, knowledge is the asset of intellectual capital. Professional relationships outside a company but in related firms and fields, is the asset of network capital. Both of these assets are very easily invested in every single day without most firms realizing it, and because they don’t realize it, they don’t capitalize on it.

How so? These gains can be very easily achieved when you have staff out on the road on business travel.

Business travel is a ‘twofer’ sort of thing, where you get two for the price of one. There’s the point of the trip itself, but then there’s way more to be gained from the opportunities which travel provides, and not just for the traveler. The traveler becomes the ticket.

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When I was the boss approving travel budgets I was very liberal with those allocations; I considered them part of my Staff Training and Education budgets. And since I considered them a kind of mobile schooling, my travelers were given homework. No written reports; I wasn’t interested in creating more work like some Scrooge wanting to get the very most out of my money. Further, I wanted people to relish their travel opportunities, and not consider them a necessary evil. The homework was simply that they had to bring back those two assets I mentioned in the beginning, and share them with the rest of us who had been left behind to hold up the fort. Depart a traveler, return a teacher and a connector.

Homework Assignment 1: For Knowledge and Intellectual Capital.
Tell the rest of us what you learned while you were gone. Teach it to us as best you can without our having the same sensory experience.

Homework Assignment 2: For Relationship and Network Capital.
Show off those business cards you collected, and tell us about the people you met. What do they do, and how will you be following up with them to strengthen the connection? Who else in our company can you introduce them to?

My travelers became very creative with this. They got to be fairly competitive about it too, but in a way that was very healthy for the knowledge and network base of the organization. They started taking pictures, so they could ‘show and tell’ in our staff meetings, but their photos weren’t of cityscapes and monuments; they tried to create that ‘sensory experience’ I’d asked about in the learning itself. My retailers took pictures of attractive shop windows and unusual visual merchandising displays. My golf pros took pictures at tournaments to help explain tricks with gallery control to their staff for our next tournament. All those trade magazines and brochures previously thought of as old news once they’d read them, were no longer chucked in hotel room trashcans. Instead, they came home in flat rate shipping boxes so they could be passed out to everyone else in their department, simply to share a greater awareness of the amount of choice in the industries we operated our own business in, or to stimulate more question and dialogue for us about market trends and breaking ideas.

On the networking side, they quickly found out the benefit of being gracious hosts, for they would invite their new connections to visit our company when we were next on their travel itineraries. When trips repeated to the same cities, or my travelers attended annual conventions, we now had a growing professional network with whom we could magnify our previous opportunities and build on them. Through others, we gained new clients or accolades about our aloha spirit, our products and services; highly valuable word-of-mouth advertising we never would have otherwise enjoyed.

This concept of smart homework for travel worked so well for us, that I’ve even applied the same thought process to the travel we do as a family on our personal vacations. It’s less specific, however it amounts to the same thing: We do things a bit out of our comfort zone, with the attitude that we’d never do the same things at home, learning something new along the way. We don’t keep to ourselves as much as before. We talk to, engage with, and meet many more people; we’ve learned to be more gregarious and social.

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You can expand your own thinking about this when you consider travel to be any thing out of the office, but theoretically still ‘on the clock.’ How about all those association luncheons and trade shows you go to right in your own back yard? What is the intellectual capital and network capital you get out of them, and what are you bringing back for those with whom you work? Do they silently resent or envy your mobility, or are they grateful they have you as the company connector? Something to think about.

Thank you for reading, I’ll be back next Thursday. On every other day, you can visit me on Talking Story, or on www.ManagingWithAloha.com. Aloha!

Rosa Say

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Managing with Aloha, Bringing Hawaii’s Universal Values to the Art of Business

Previous Thursday Column: When Does Great Service Happen?

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Last Updated on October 9, 2018

How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

Most of you made personal, one sentence resolutions like “I want to lose weight” or “I vow to go back to school.” It is a tradition to start the New Year with things you want to achieve, but under the influence resolutions are often unrealistic.

If you’re wondering when will be a good time to write a mission statement, NOW is the time to take a personal inventory to make this year your most productive year ever. You may be asking yourself, “How am I going to do that?” You, my friends, are going to write personal mission statements.

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A large number of corporations use mission statements to define the purpose of the company’s existence. Sony wants to “become the company most known for changing the worldwide poor-quality image of Japanese products” and 3M wants “to solve unsolved problems innovatively”. A personal mission statement is different than a corporate mission statement, but the fundamentals are the same.

So why do you need one? A personal statement will help you identify your core values and beliefs in one fluid tapestry of content that you can read anytime and anywhere to stay on task toward success.

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For example, Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire came to the realization that he had lost track of what was important to him. After writing a personal mission statement, we saw him start his own business and he got the girl, Renee Zelleweger. Not bad, wouldn’t you say? A personal mission statement will make sure that, through all the texting, emailing and constant bombardment of on-the-go activity, you won’t lose sight of what is most important to you.

Mission statements can be simple and concise while others are longer and filled with detail. The length of your personal mission statement will not be determined until you follow this simple equation to create your motivational springboard for 2008.

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To begin your internal cleansing, you will need to jot down the required information in the following five steps:

  1. What are your values? Values steer your actions and determine where you spend time, energy, and most importantly, money. Be specific and unique to yourself. Too much generalization will not be as effective. It is called a “personal” mission statement for a reason.
  2. What are three important goals you hope to achieve this year? Keep your list of important goals small and give them a date. It is better to focus on the horizon and not the stars. Realistic goals are keys to ultimate success.
  3. What image do you hope to project to yourself? How you see yourself is how the world will view you. Think about this carefully. Your image should encompass what you look like and feel after you have achieved your goals.
  4. Write down action statements from each value describing how you will use those values to achieve your three goals. Start with “I will…”
  5. Rewrite your statement to include only your action statements. Make portable copies for your wallet, car or office.

If you followed the steps above, congratulations! You have just written your first personal mission statement. Your personal statement will change over the years as your goals change. You can have more than one statement for the different compartments of your life such as your career, family, marriage, etc.

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Writing a personal mission statement is an effective method to ensure your productivity is at its peak. It is an ideal tradition to start so that when next year rolls around, the outdated practice of resolutions will be something you permanently left in the past.

Featured photo credit: Álvaro Serrano via unsplash.com

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