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Book Review: The 360 Degree Leader

Book Review: The 360 Degree Leader
360 Degree Leader

    A John C. Maxwell book published by Nelson Business 2005, 313 pages, Nonfiction, Business, Leadership and Personal Development, Includes bibliographical references.

    I’m not certain if the motivation for the focus of this book is to unselfishly provide growth insights to those in middle management or a cunning device to target the very people who buy the most books about growth and leadership, but much of Maxwell’s book is devoted to leading from the middle.

    Either way the result is the same.

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    Who buys the most books about leadership and personal growth? Those who are in middle leadership positions that desire to their job better and possible go further in their chosen field.

    Who needs the greatest understanding of leadership models and personal development? Those who are in middle management positions that desire to do their job better and possibly to advance.

    Reality is probably a blend of the two and Maxwell does a good job of providing what both audiences want. A nice handbook on leadership from every direction (leading your subordinates, building you superior, enhancing your peers).

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    Maxwell examines two tenets of leadership which you may find you feel you have conflicting emotions (I know i did).

    Maxwell believes that those who are deficit in leadership skills tend to hoard their information. They protect their work from peers, supervisors and subordinates in order to make sure they receive their due credit for the work they have done.

    He also believes that true leaders share everything. They share their best ideas, their hardest work, their most invested projects with everyone from every level in order to provide for the good of all. He feels this type of leader will ultimately reap the benefits of their unselfish and dedicated efforts and, like cream, rise to the top.

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    Here is where I feel torn. I really, really want to embrace this as truth. i want to believe that selfless dedication and talent will ultimately be rewarded.

    On the other hand, I think of the countless instances in which the work of one of my peers (or myself, for that matter) has been claim jumped by someone else in an organization who rode it to the next level on the pay scale.

    So, even though I strongly desire to embrace his positive message, I have my reservations.

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    One of the most interesting facets of the book is actually concealed under the back dust cover. If you purchase the book you get access to an online profile of your leadership beliefs and styles. Inside the rear dust jacket is the authorization code to gain you access to a twenty minute survey about your leadership. The difference between this and all the other surveys out there is the option to have a questionnaire to have several other surveys about YOUR leadership skills sent to your supervisor, your peers and your subordinates. They then rate you on the same skills in which you rated yourself. The results are then compiled and submitted to you. This will provide you with the 360 degree snap shot of your leadership.

    The catch? It costs about a hundred bucks to have the second part of the leadership survey done. But, if you work in a progressive field you may be able to convince your organization that they should cover the expense as an investment in their leadership growth program. At least that’s what I told my boss.

    The 360 Degree Leadership

    Reg Adkins writes on behavior and the human experience at (elementaltruths.blogspot.com).

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    Last Updated on October 9, 2018

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    Most of you made personal, one sentence resolutions like “I want to lose weight” or “I vow to go back to school.” It is a tradition to start the New Year with things you want to achieve, but under the influence resolutions are often unrealistic.

    If you’re wondering when will be a good time to write a mission statement, NOW is the time to take a personal inventory to make this year your most productive year ever. You may be asking yourself, “How am I going to do that?” You, my friends, are going to write personal mission statements.

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    A large number of corporations use mission statements to define the purpose of the company’s existence. Sony wants to “become the company most known for changing the worldwide poor-quality image of Japanese products” and 3M wants “to solve unsolved problems innovatively”. A personal mission statement is different than a corporate mission statement, but the fundamentals are the same.

    So why do you need one? A personal statement will help you identify your core values and beliefs in one fluid tapestry of content that you can read anytime and anywhere to stay on task toward success.

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    For example, Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire came to the realization that he had lost track of what was important to him. After writing a personal mission statement, we saw him start his own business and he got the girl, Renee Zelleweger. Not bad, wouldn’t you say? A personal mission statement will make sure that, through all the texting, emailing and constant bombardment of on-the-go activity, you won’t lose sight of what is most important to you.

    Mission statements can be simple and concise while others are longer and filled with detail. The length of your personal mission statement will not be determined until you follow this simple equation to create your motivational springboard for 2008.

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    To begin your internal cleansing, you will need to jot down the required information in the following five steps:

    1. What are your values? Values steer your actions and determine where you spend time, energy, and most importantly, money. Be specific and unique to yourself. Too much generalization will not be as effective. It is called a “personal” mission statement for a reason.
    2. What are three important goals you hope to achieve this year? Keep your list of important goals small and give them a date. It is better to focus on the horizon and not the stars. Realistic goals are keys to ultimate success.
    3. What image do you hope to project to yourself? How you see yourself is how the world will view you. Think about this carefully. Your image should encompass what you look like and feel after you have achieved your goals.
    4. Write down action statements from each value describing how you will use those values to achieve your three goals. Start with “I will…”
    5. Rewrite your statement to include only your action statements. Make portable copies for your wallet, car or office.

    If you followed the steps above, congratulations! You have just written your first personal mission statement. Your personal statement will change over the years as your goals change. You can have more than one statement for the different compartments of your life such as your career, family, marriage, etc.

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    Writing a personal mission statement is an effective method to ensure your productivity is at its peak. It is an ideal tradition to start so that when next year rolls around, the outdated practice of resolutions will be something you permanently left in the past.

    Featured photo credit: Álvaro Serrano via unsplash.com

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