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Book Review: Outrageous Guilt-Free Selling, Unforgetable Service

Book Review: Outrageous Guilt-Free Selling, Unforgetable Service
Outrageous Guilt-Free Selling, Unforgetable Service

    A T. Scott Gross book published by Oakhill Press, 1996, 304 pages. Nonfiction: Business and Personal Growth. The book theme: Sell a customer, get paid once…serve a customer, get paid again and again.

    His mantra…

    1. Reward high pressure service not high pressure sales.

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    2. Teach guilt free selling.

    3. Be an example of a servant leader.

    This book conducts a survey of the strategies the author terms “POS” (Positively Outrageous Selling) and its impact on business growth, profitability and personal success.

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    The author sees the book as a “buddy in a binding.” His writing assumes the voice of a friend to the reader. He avoids the usual standards of business theory and profitability. Instead he tries to provide a workbook, or rather a handbook, for successful operations.

    The treatment of the material takes on a “Do this next” or “insert tab A into slot B” voice.

    The author began his business experiences in the restaurant world (a chicken franchise in Texas!). Now, unless you have a gourmet set up, one restaurant is about like another. There are only so many ways you can cook a steak. So, to be successful, the restaurateur must make a connection with his patrons either by amazing service or sheer force of personality.

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    Gross has blended the two.

    The layout of the book is very sequential in one sense. For example, “Step 1 is…part A of step 1 is… section i of part A of step 1 is…,” and so on.

    All in all, it is a fair overview of marketing through service. But, it is a little high energy to read much of at one sitting. There is a lot of use of all CAPITALS, bold font, underlining and tons of exclamation points! These tend to distract me from the content itself.

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    I did particularly enjoy the “Wows and Bloopers” section at the end of the book. There are some very interesting turnaround stories from some pretty big business and Gross does a lot of namedropping.

    In summary, if you like reading bits of things that you can pull out and use; this is a good choice for you. On the other hand, if you like to read a whole book to understand the continuity of the message this tome will make you a little batty.

    Reg Adkins writes on behavior and the human experience at (elementaltruths.blogspot.com).

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    Last Updated on October 15, 2019

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

    Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

    Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

    Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

    Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination:

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    1. Make a list of your goal destinations

    Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

    So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

    Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

    If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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    2. Think about the time frame to have the goal accomplished

    This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

    Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

    3. Write down your goals clearly

    Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

    For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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    4. Write down what you need to do for each goal

    Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

    These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

    5. Write down your timeframe with specific and realistic dates

    Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

    For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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    Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

    6. Schedule your to-dos

    Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

    Write these action points on a schedule so that you have definite dates on which to do things.

    7. Review your progress

    At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

    Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

    Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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