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Being A Creative

Being A Creative

We are all creative, but being “a creative” usually refers to someone for whom creativity is life’s goal: Illustrator, Architect, Advertising Art Director, Writer, Musician, Photographer, Designer, Etc. Scientists, Surgeons, Marketing Managers, CEO’s and other problem solving discovery professions are among our species most creative members, but typically don’t get the label. Neither do accountants, unless of course they depart from normal accounting practice. Creativity is everywhere, but only those who commit their life of – at times – considerable hardship to advance their creative brand, get labeled “a creative”. Here is one thing I’ve notice: once “a creative” always a creative – the unearthing is in your soul. If you’re not “doing” you’re remembering how great it felt to “do”.


There is a certain momentum – or lack of – that goes hand-in-hand with making creativity your vocation. For those familiar with inertia, it can – on frequent occasion – feel like acts of God are required to get creative juices flowing fast enough to sever butt from couch and go “do”. It’s often called, “getting fired up” and that fire comes from within but is typically stimulated from the outside. Or – maybe it takes a slowing of the current in which you’re swimming which allows you to “do”; when required inertia ebbs. Most often, life’s river runs so fast, getting out of the current is too daunting; a fearful act. Let’s call that fast moving current: “the main stream”.

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A friend once related her philosophy to me: “If I’m not sure what to decide, and I’m not forced to, I make no decision.” If there is any statement that is anti-creative, it’s that one: It’s gutless, it’s ordinary, it’s mainstream. It’s how most of us live and it’s as comfortable as a soft couch.

There is this guy I know who recently jumped to shore out of the main stream. He’s been “a creative” all his life – which is significant because he’s well into the second half by any measure. Some must consider him restless and lacking focus, but I prefer to see him as an inquisitive life pupil. Climbing a-shore without traction only to fall back into the stream has dotted his life’s timeline. Not gutless by any stretch, but longing for comfort. Maybe it’s you?

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Ok – it’s me. After nearly a two year hiatus as Director of Marketing for a small Internet Development Company, I was reminded by a close friend how to have fun with my native profession – Photography. It took an act of fate for my long time Pal to invite me to join his crew at exactly the right time. Trips to the North Carolina Smokey Mountains, South Carolina Low Country, Amsterdam, London, Paris and over ten thousand shutter clicks managed to get me excited about “doing” and again wrestling with the challenge of being “a creative” – imagine that?

Back home in North Carolina I sit restlessly on shore of the main stream – retooled and re-energized, determined not to fall back in; I’m not a good swimmer but envy those who are. The trick for me now is to make such a photographic hullabaloo on my little piece of real estate that those avid swimmers slow progress long enough to see what’s up and ask how I can help them swim faster. A tall order, but after all, I’m “a creative”. It’s time to accept it and move on.

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How about you? Are you too comfortable, a bad swimmer, or both?

To see what Bruce DeBoer up to, visit: http://www.deboerworks.com.

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Last Updated on October 15, 2019

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination:

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1. Make a list of your goal destinations

Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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2. Think about the time frame to have the goal accomplished

This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

3. Write down your goals clearly

Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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4. Write down what you need to do for each goal

Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

5. Write down your timeframe with specific and realistic dates

Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

6. Schedule your to-dos

Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

Write these action points on a schedule so that you have definite dates on which to do things.

7. Review your progress

At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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