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Avoiding Seasonal Weight Gain

Avoiding Seasonal Weight Gain
Apple Pie

    I suppose this article is timely only for those in the hemisphere that is currently approaching winter. All you lucky ducks heading for bright lights and sunshine will just have to file this one away for a few months.

    For those of us moving into the long dark tea time of the soul known as winter, an ominous question presents itself.

    Do you pack on the extra pounds in the long dark hours of winter?

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    Joking aside, many people add extra pounds during the seasons which have less light. This may be due to having fewer daylight hours to be out and about. Or it may be due to people deciding this would be a good time to have another slice of warm pie by the fire. Personally, I believe it has a lot to do with the unconscious snacking we do while sitting in front of the sports network.

    But, whatever the reason most people consume far more calories than they realize, especially in winter. The solution might be a sharpened sense of portion size.

    Understanding the concept of standard serving sizes is essential to good nutrition.

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    Take a look at fast food restaurants. Most chain restaurant employees automatically offer “super-size” or “value” meals when taking an order. These meals which I have named “impulse upgrades” often contain an entire day’s worth of calories and much more than a day’s worth of fat.

    If you figure taking in an additional 148 calories per day (that’s conservative) and adding no additional caloric burn, you get a formula that packs on an extra 15 pounds every year.

    But, even if calories from fat are decreased— we make up for lower fat intakes with larger portion sizes. More calories from larger portion size lead to weight gain, period.

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    But, what is a portion size? You can use the following visuals to approximate portion sizes:

    • A computer mouse = one serving (three ounces) of meat, poultry, or fish.
    • Half a baseball = one serving (one-half cup) of fruit, vegetables, pasta, or rice.
    • Your thumb = one serving (one ounce) of cheese.
    • A tennis ball = one serving (one cup) of yogurt or chopped fresh greens.

    When at Home:

    • Take time to “eyeball” the serving sizes of your favorite foods (using some of the models listed above).
    • Measure out single servings onto your plates and bowls, and remember what they look like.
    • Serve up plates with appropriate portions in the kitchen, and don’t go back for seconds.
    • Never eat snacks out of the bag.

    When Dining Out:

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    • Ask for half or smaller portions.
    • Set the rest aside that which is more than a portion and ask for a take home bag.
    • If you order dessert, share it.

    Reg Adkins writes on behavior and the human experience at (elementaltruths.blogspot.com).

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    Last Updated on September 15, 2020

    7 Helpful Reminders When You Want to Make Big Life Changes

    7 Helpful Reminders When You Want to Make Big Life Changes

    Overcoming fear and making life changes is hard. It’s even harder when it’s a big change—breaking up with someone you love, leaving your old job, starting your own business, or hundreds of other difficult choices.

    Even if it’s obvious that making a big change will be beneficial, it can be tough. Our mind wants to stay where it’s comfortable, which means doing the same things we’ve always done[1].

    We worry: how do we know if we’re making the right decision? We wish we knew more. How do we make a decision without all of the necessary information?

    We feel stuck. How do we get past fear and move forward with that thing we want to do?

    Well, I certainly don’t have all the answers, but here are 7 things to remember when you want to move forward and make positive life changes.

    1. You’ll Never Have All the Information

    We often avoid making important decisions because we want more information before we make a tough call.

    Yes, it’s certainly true that you need to do your research, but if you’re waiting for the crystal clear answer to come to you, then you’re going to be waiting a long time. As humans, we are curious creatures, and our need for information can be paralyzing.

    Life is a series of guesses, mistakes, and revisions. Make the best decision you can at the time and continue to move forward. This also means learning to listen to and trust your intuition. Here’s how.

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    2. Have the Courage to Trust Yourself

    We make all sorts of excuses for not making important life changes, but the limiting belief that often underlies many of them is that we don’t trust ourselves to do the right thing.

    We think that if we get into a new situation, we won’t know what to do or how to react. We’re worried that the uncharted territory of the future will be too much for us to handle.

    Give yourself more credit than that.

    You’ve dealt with unexpected changes before, right? And when your car got a flat tire on the way to work, how did that end up? Or when you were unexpectedly dumped?

    In the end, you were fine.

    Humans are amazingly adaptable, and your whole life has been helping you develop skills to face unexpected challenges.

    Have enough courage to trust yourself. No matter what happens, you’ll figure out a way to make it work.

    3. What’s the Worst That Could Happen?

    Like jealousy, most of your fears are created in your own head.

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    When you actually sit down and think about the worst case scenario, you’ll realize that there are actually very few risks that you can’t recover from.

    Ask yourself, “What’s the worst that could happen?” Once you realize the worst isn’t that bad, you’ll be ready to crush it.

    When you’re preparing to make a big life change, write down all of the things you’re afraid of. Are you afraid of failing? Of looking silly? Of losing money? Of being unhappy?

    Then, address each fear by writing down ways you can overcome them. For example, if you’re afraid of losing money, can you take a few months to save up a safety net?

    4. It’s Just as Much About the Process as It Is About the Result

    We’re so wrapped up in results when we think about major life changes. We worry that if we start out towards a big goal, then we might not make it to the finish line.

    However, you’re allowed to change your mind. And failing will only help you learn what not to do next time.

    Furthermore, just because you don’t reach the final goal doesn’t mean you failed. You chose the goal in the first place, but you’re allowed to alter it if you find that the goal isn’t working out the way you hoped. Failure is not a destination, and neither is success.

    Enjoy the process of moving forward[2].

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    5. Continue to Pursue Opportunity

    If you’re on the fence about a big decision, then you might be worried about getting locked into a position that you can’t escape from.

    Think about it a different way. New choices rarely limit your options.

    In fact, new pursuits often open up even more opportunities. One of the best things about going after important goals with passion is that they open up chances and options that you never could have expected in the beginning.

    If you pursue the interesting opportunities that arise along the path to your goal, then you can be sure that you’ll always have choices.

    6. Effort Matters, So Use It

    It sounds simple, but one of the big reasons we don’t make life changes is because we don’t try. And we don’t try because then it’s easy to make excuses for why we don’t get what we want.

    Flunked that test? Are you stupid? “Of course I’m not stupid. I just didn’t study. I would have gotten an A if I actually studied.”

    Stuck in a job you hate? Why haven’t you found a new job yet? “Well, I haven’t really tried to get a new job. I could totally ace that interview if I wanted.”

    Why do we make excuses like these to ourselves? It’s because if we try and fail, then we just failed. But if we don’t try, we can chalk it up to laziness.

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    Get over it. Failure happens to everyone.

    And the funny thing is, if you actually try—because it’s pretty clear that most people aren’t trying—then you’ll win a lot more than you think.

    7. Start With Something Manageable

    You can’t climb Everest if you don’t try hiking beforehand.

    Maybe applying for your dream job seems intimidating right now. What can you start with today?

    Can you talk to someone who already has that position and see what they think makes them successful? Can you improve your skills so you meet one of the qualifications? Can you take a free online course to expand your resume?

    Maybe you’re not quite ready for a long-term relationship, but you know you want to start dating. Could you try asking out a mutual friend? Can you go out more with friends to practice your communication skills and meet new people?

    You don’t need to be a world changer today; you just need to make small life changes in your own world.

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    Featured photo credit: Victor Rodriguez via unsplash.com

    Reference

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