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A.V. Squad Rocks!

A.V. Squad Rocks!

If you pay much attention to media trends (Especially Oprah Winfry and Bill Gates who is king of the geeks) you’ll notice a growing fervor concerning the state of education in America. They site falling test scores and dropping graduation rates as proof of their claims.

Their solution…

  • more time in the class room
  • more classes in general
  • better textbooks
  • better teacher training programs
  • raise performance standards

Unfortunately they are wrong.

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In my opinion Jean Piaget (the late) was not a great psychologist. However, hid he did have phenomenal powers of observation.

What did he observe?

People increase their knowledge base and comprehension (ie learn) when they touch and manipulate tactile items.

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Frank Wilson is the neurologist who wrote the book, “The Hand, How Its Use Shapes the Brain.” He said, “Humans were designed to build their brains by using their hands.”

Sounds a lot like Piaget doesn’t it?

Unfortunately, inactivity is creating mass brain power atrophy in America.

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A Kaiser Family Foundation study found that children spend less than 1.5 hours a day doing physical activity.

What is the result of a person who grows up with such a limited physical activity base?

In an interview with a Meridith Corporation magazine reporter an MIT professor spoke about engineering students who didn’t know which way to turn a screw to tighten it (Hello! Righty tighty, lefty loosey).

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Take steps to protect your intellectual prowess and boos your brain power with the following activities.

  1. Do your own small repairs. Get comfortable with your tool kit.
  2. Buy an erector set. Sorting, assembly and following detailed project directions is excellent mental exercise.
  3. Build a bird or dog house but just look at pictures and come up with your own design specs. Better start with scrap on this one.
  4. Take up a musical instrument. You don’t have to be talented. The process is the important part.

Reg Adkins writes on behavior and the human experience at (elementaltruths.blogspot.com).

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Last Updated on July 25, 2018

Finding Your Inside Time

Finding Your Inside Time

An old article that is worth mentioning is called Finding Your Inside Time by David Allen.

David talks about his style on capturing your life details within a journal. By writing every action required items into your journal, you will have more freedom from detaching yourself from all those pressures. He says keeping a journal is like a core dump which can act as your stress release and spiritual in-basket:

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Just making a free-form list of all the things you have attention on is a form of journaling and is at least momentarily liberating. On the most mundane level, it is capturing all of the “oh, yeah, I need to …” stuff—phone calls to make, things to get at the store, things to talk to your boss or your assistant about, etc. At this level, it doesn’t usually make for a very exciting or interesting experience—just a necessary one to clear the most obvious cargo on the deck.

I often use my journal for “core-dumping” the subtler and more ambiguous things rattling around in my psyche. It’s like doing a current-reality inventory of the things that really have my attention—the big blips on my internal radar. These can be either negative or positive, like relationship issues, career decisions or unexpected events that have created disturbances or new opportunities. Sometimes core-dumping is the best way to get started when nothing else is flowing—just an objectification of what is on my internal landscape.

This is a key point that David has emphasized in his book Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity – and it is one of the effective tools that I use daily.

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Finding Your Inside Time – [Writers Digest]

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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