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Achieving Work-Life Balance #2: Long Work Hours and the Impact It May Have On Your Family

Achieving Work-Life Balance #2: Long Work Hours and the Impact It May Have On Your Family

In many areas of the world eight hours is considered a traditional workday. Even though it is known as a standard workday, a large portion of the world population works more than eight hours. An employee often works more than eight hours a day because their employer requires it or because they need the money. Regardless of the reason for doing so, it has been proven that long hours can have a negative impact on an employee and their family.

There are a number of health risks associated with working long hours. These health risks are elevated for workers in certain professions. Working longer than the traditional eight hours is likely to place a large amount of stress on employees. It has been known that stress is likely to cause a sleep deprivation. Individuals who suffer from a lack of sleep and a large amount of stress are likely to have a weak immune system. To be able to fight illness an individual body needs to receive the appropriate amount of rest and relaxation.

When an employer puts their health at risk they are not only putting themselves in danger, but those around them. Contagious colds and illnesses could spread from employee to employee or it can even be brought into the home. The last thing that an employer wants is for employees to get ill and request time off from work, but that does not stop many of them from requesting or requiring their employees to work long hours.

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The most obvious impact that long hours will have on you and your family is the amount of time that you will get to spend with them. Whether you are a newlywed or a parent, the time that you spend at home is important to your family relationships. It is not uncommon for tension to be present in a household where one or more of the home occupants are working long hours. It is also possible for unnecessary stress to occur when one family member is picking up extra household duties due to the other one working long hours.

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When an employee has regularly been putting in long hours at their workplace it is often difficult to stop. It is not uncommon for an employee to fear asking their employer for a reduction in hours in fear of losing their job. If a job was accepted on the terms that workdays would be longer than most traditional ones it may be difficult for you to find a solution to your long hours. If you agreed to the work arrangement your only alternative may be finding an organization that values the balance between working and life. If you did not agree to work long hours and were only doing so to bring in extra income you are encouraged to speak with your employer about returning to traditional work hours if your hours are having a negative impact on yourself and your family.

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There are many individuals who are required to work long hours or multiple jobs to financially support themselves and their family. Even if you are one of those individuals who must work long hours you still deserve to have a healthy balance between your work and your life.

— Jennifer Foote.
We will continue to discuss work & life balance in the series of Achieving Work-Life Balance. Stay tuned.

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Last Updated on August 12, 2020

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

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So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

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3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

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For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

6. Schedule Your To-Dos

Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

7. Use Your Reticular Activating System to Get Your Goal

Learn in this Lifehack’s vlog how you can hack your brain with the Reticular Activation System (RAS) and reach your goal more efficiently:

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8. Review Your Progress

At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

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Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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