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A First Look at the new Todoist

A First Look at the new Todoist

To say that you support HTML5 may seem like a marketing gimmick nowadays and a way to put the little HTML5 banner on your site, but HTML5 is a great technology that allows developers deliver rich and powerful web applications. These applications can be so powerful inside of the browser that they can look and feel like native desktop applications.

When I got the email about the new Todoist being rebuilt using HTML5 technologies, I was nothing but excited. There are some apps online that can get away with taking time and posting back to a server as well as have the possibility of the server being unreachable at times that won’t be too disrupting to a service. Task and project managers are not one of them. Let’s take a look at the new Todoist, what it has to offer, and what it feels like to use.

Speed

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Adding tasks to Todoist

    One of the new Todoist’s selling points is its speed. I will say it does feel like using a native app. This is done by making the interface highly responsive while doing all of the data transfer of creating, updating, and deleting data asynchronously. You don’t have to wait for data to be passed from the your web client to the Todoist server and vice versa.

    Moving, creating, updating, and deleting tasks is simple and works well. Even all of the searching and sorting is done client side making filtering of your lists and tasks nice and fast.

    Local storage

    Another killer feature of the new Todoist is its use of HTML5’s local storage API. This allows the app to go offline if the Todoist server isn’t available and use local storage to create and modify your data. When the server comes back, all of your data is pushed back to the cloud and synced up. Like I said in the intro, this is an excellent feature for a task and project management application because of the nature of its use. People tend to use their project management application day-in and day-out, so having it available at any time, regardless if a server is up is crucial.

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      In my limited use of the Todoist beta, I didn’t experience the server going offline so I disabled my WiFi instead to force Todoist into offline mode. Once my WiFi was off I started adding project and tasks and then was notified by a little yield symbol that I was working offline and that Todoist would check for connectivity soon. Either that, or I could force a sync. I manipulated some of my data (deleted and added things, edited some todos, etc.) and then flipped on WiFi. In about 20 seconds I was back online with Todoist in sync.

      The use of the local storage API is fantastic and will be a precedent setter for any other web based task and project management apps in the future.

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      Mobile

      Another key feature of the new Todoist is its mobile support. The ideas is to have one app that supports a desktop browser as well as a mobile browser to ensure that your todos are available anywhere, anytime.

        The mobile app is relatively fast on an iPhone, but you can feel the “webapp” lag that accompanies any non-native app on a mobile device. It does work well though and manipulating tasks seems fast enough and responsive. To be completely honest though, I’d rather have a native iPhone app than a mobile web app. The web app for desktop doesn’t bother me because my computer’s browser has enough horsepower, but using it on a limited mobile device, you can really feel the difference.

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        Another issue that I had with the mobile app is its use of non-retina graphics for the refresh and add task buttons as well as the Todoist logo itself. It’s a small detail, but something that takes away from the user experience.

        The beta of the new Todoist shows us that you can now have a decently complicated webapp feel like a desktop app with the use of HTML5 and JavaScript in the browser. The app is fast and fluid and truly does feel like a desktop app when in use. Despite the few bugs I ran into (it’s a beta, remember), I’d have to say that the new Todoist is going to be one of the best web based productivity apps that will be available. It will be interesting to see what other apps like Toodledo, Remember the Milk, etc. do in response to this dynamic change of Todoist. Check out the new Todoist for yourself and let us know what you think in the comments.

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        CM Smith

        A technologist and writer who shares advice on personal productivity, creativity and how to use technology to get things done.

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        Last Updated on July 13, 2020

        How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

        How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them

        Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

        Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

        Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

        Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination.

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        1. Make a List of Your Goal Destinations

        Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

        So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

        Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

        If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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        2. Think About the Time Frame to Have the Goal Accomplished

        This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

        Learn the differences between a short term goal and a long term goal. Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

        3. Write Down Your Goals Clearly

        Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

        For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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        4. Write Down What You Need to Do for Each Goal

        Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

        These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

        5. Write Down Your Timeframe With Specific and Realistic Dates

        Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

        For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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        Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

        6. Schedule Your To-Dos

        Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

        Write these action points on a schedule, you have definite dates on which to do things.

        7. Review Your Progress

        At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

        Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

        More Tips for Achieving Goals

        Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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