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8 Tips to Create a Day to Recharge Your Motivation

8 Tips to Create a Day to Recharge Your Motivation

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    It’s easy to recognize when you’re physically tired. You haven’t slept normally in days or even weeks. You can’t remember the last time you saw the inside of a gym. And enough caffeine is racing through your bloodstream to keep a small elephant alert.

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    When your motivation is down, the effects can be worse than physical tiredness. You can’t concentrate, you procrastinate and become as lazy as possible. What’s worse, it is hard to tell that a motivation recharge is what you need.

    Why You Might Need a Motivation Boost

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    I think at this point it is important to distinguish between needing an occasional motivating boost, and constantly needing to motivate yourself. If constant motivation is necessary for you to complete anything, you probably lack the intrinsic motivation of satisfying work. Recharging your enthusiasm can’t make up for a lousy job.

    But even the most energetic and inspired people can go through a dry patch where their motivation falters. Here’s just a few potential reasons:

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    1. Negative feedback. I’d be lying if I felt the same after reading a piece of harsh criticism than glowing praise. I’m sure you probably feel the same. A few harsh blows to your ego can cause waning motivation in all but the most stoic and enlightened human beings.
    2. Disappointment and failures. We can be our own worst critics. Just as a big win can fill you with enthusiasm, a big mistake can dampen your motivation.
    3. Routines, habits and missing goals. Spending weeks doing the same things repeatedly can make it easy to lose sight of why you started doing them in the first place. Zig Ziglar once said that motivating was like bathing. It isn’t permanent, but that doesn’t mean he wouldn’t insist upon doing it.
    4. Stress and frustration. I know people who were excellent students but did horribly on tests right after a break-up. Sometimes an upset in one area can reduce your motivation in another area, even if it is otherwise enjoyable.

    Creating a Motivation Recharge Minute, Hour or Day

    The headline of this article suggests creating a motivation recharge day. I find this can be useful to take time going over all of your goals, reviewing your progress and planning for the future. The effect on your motivation can be incredible. But the times you feel the least motivated are often the times you have the most pressing commitments. An entire day might not be possible.

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    I’ve found you can inject a bit of motivation into a few minutes or an hour. The effect won’t be as powerful as taking an entire day to recharge, but it can still be helpful. Here are some tips for how to recharge your motivation:

    1. Dissect Solvable Problems – Is your motivation waning because of a problem in another area of life? If that is the case, ask yourself whether the problem has a fast solution. If it does, the best way to fix your motivation is to fix the problem. This could be talking to a friend you had a fight with or sorting out a disorganized room.
    2. Avoid Impossible Problems – There are some problems that can’t be solved, or aren’t worth the effort to do so. Losing your wallet, making a bad first impression or messing up a presentation can’t be fixed, so trying to solve them will probably have the opposite effect.
    3. Listen to Audio Tapes – Are a lot of self-help tapes nothing but common sense wrapped up in an emotionally satisfying package? Probably. But that emotionally satisfying package can still be useful if it helps build your enthusiasm. Zig Ziglar, Tony Robbins, Brian Tracy and many others have motivational tapes which can get your ideas going again. Hopefully reading this post can get your ideas going.
    4. Read “Lifehack” Blogs – There are plenty of blogs dedicated to self-improvement, including lifehack.org. Getting a few snippets of good ideas can get your motivation flowing again.
    5. Review Your Goals – Go over all of your goals. Go over how you plan to achieve them and spend time thinking about what they consist of. It is easy to lose sight of your overall direction when you’re caught up with a daily routine. This is also the time to make corrections and plan new goals if your old direction doesn’t suit you anymore.
    6. Get an Energy Donation – Spend time with people that make you feel motivated and good about yourself. I don’t suggest spending all your time with a personal cheerleading team. That might lead to missing important information that might be negative. But being around people who are positive and can get your ideas flowing again can boost you out of a motivation deficit.
    7. Avoid Energy Vampires – Brad from 30sleeps calls people who drain your motivation, “energy vampires”. Avoid these people like the plague. Having people who can deliver bad news is important, but otherwise don’t spend time with these people. If you are forced to be with these vampires because of a work or school environment, then at least dedicate a few days to avoid them while you recover your motivation.
    8. Have a Project-Kill Day – Sometimes the best way to recharge your motivation is to accomplish something meaningful. I’ve found setting aside a day to accomplish more than usual (waking up early, getting done several major tasks right in the morning, etc.) can rebuild the faith you have in your abilities.

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    Scott H Young

    Scott is obsessed with personal development. For the last ten years, he's been experimenting to find out how to learn and think better.

    15 Ways to Cultivate Continuous Learning for a Sharper Brain 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines How to Motivate Yourself: 13 Simple Ways You Can Try Right Now 18 Tricks to Make New Habits Stick 18 Tips for Killer Presentations

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    Last Updated on October 15, 2019

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

    How to Plan Your Life Goals and Actually Achieve Them in 7 Simple Steps

    Where do you want to be 5 years from now, 10 years from now, or even this time next year? These places are your goal destinations and although you might know that you don’t want to be standing still in the same place as you are now, it’s not always easy to identify what your real goals are.

    Many people think that setting a goal destination is having a dream that is there in the far distant future but will never be attained. This proves to be a self-fulfilling prophesy because of two things:

    Firstly, that the goal isn’t specifically defined enough in the first place; and secondly, it remains a remote dream waiting for action which is never taken.

    Defining your goal destination is something that you need to take some time to think carefully about. The following steps on how to plan your life goals should get you started on a journey to your destination:

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    1. Make a list of your goal destinations

    Goal destinations are the things that are important to you. Another word for them would be ambitions, but ambitions sound like something which outside of your grasp, whereas goal destinations are certainly achievable if you are willing to put in the effort working towards them.

    So what do you really want to do with your life? What are the main things that you would like to accomplish with your life? What is it that you would really regret not doing if you suddenly found you had a limited amount of time left on the earth?

    Each of these things is a goal. Define each goal destination in one sentence.

    If any of these goals is a stepping stone to another one of the goals, take it off this list as it isn’t a goal destination.

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    2. Think about the time frame to have the goal accomplished

    This is where the 5 year, 10 year, next year plan comes into it.

    Some goals will have a “shelf life” because of age, health, finance, etc, whereas others will be up to you as to when you would like to achieve them by.

    3. Write down your goals clearly

    Write each goal destination at the top of a new piece of paper.

    For each goal, write down what is it that you need and don’t have now that will allow you achieve that goal. This could be some kind of education, career change, finance, a new skill, etc. Any “stepping stone” goals you removed will fit into this exercise. If any of these smaller “goals” have sub-goals, go through the same process with these so that you have precise action points to work with.

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    4. Write down what you need to do for each goal

    Under each item listed, write down the things that you will need to do in order to complete each of the steps required to complete the goal. 

    These items will become a check-list. They are a tangible way of checking how you are progressing towards reaching your goal destinations. A record of your success!

    5. Write down your timeframe with specific and realistic dates

    Using the time frames you created, on each goal destination sheet write down the year in which you will complete the goal by.

    For any goal which has no fixed completion date, think about when you would like to have accomplished it by and use that as your destination date.

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    Work within the time frames for each goal destination, make a note of realistic dates by which you will complete each of the small steps.

    6. Schedule your to-dos

    Now take an overview of all your goal destinations and make a schedule of what you need to do this week, this month, this year – in order to progress along the road towards your goal destinations.

    Write these action points on a schedule so that you have definite dates on which to do things.

    7. Review your progress

    At the end of the year, review what you have done this year, mark things off the check-lists for each goal destination and write up the schedule with the action points you need for the next year.

    Although it may take you several years to, for example, get the promotion you desire because you first need to get the MBA which means getting a job with more money to allow you to finance a part-time degree course, you will ultimately be successful in achieving your goal destination because you have planned out not only what you want, but how to get it, and have been pro-active towards achieving it.

    Featured photo credit: Debby Hudson via unsplash.com

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