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6 Myths Of Creativity

6 Myths Of Creativity
6 Myths Of Creativity

I don’t know about creativity, but I’ve found time restrictions and money can boost productivity and, sometimes, creativity. This may not be true.

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FastCompany, in 2004, published the results of an experiment analyzing “12,000 daily journal entries from 238 people working on creative projects”. The result is the 6 myths of creativity.

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In our diary study, people often thought they were most creative when they were working under severe deadline pressure. But the 12,000 aggregate days that we studied showed just the opposite: People were the least creative when they were fighting the clock. In fact, we found a kind of time-pressure hangover — when people were working under great pressure, their creativity went down not only on that day but the next two days as well. Time pressure stifles creativity because people can’t deeply engage with the problem. Creativity requires an incubation period; people need time to soak in a problem and let the ideas bubble up.

Another point in the article is that creativity shouldn’t be only for those who are ‘creative’. I find a lot of people think in that way that they aren’t ‘creative’ people and thus can’t do anything particularly creative.

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I always tell them that they can. It’s just a matter of training that part of your brain and, if required, co-ordination. What do you think?

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The 6 Myths Of Creativity – [FastCompany]

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Last Updated on July 25, 2018

Finding Your Inside Time

Finding Your Inside Time

An old article that is worth mentioning is called Finding Your Inside Time by David Allen.

David talks about his style on capturing your life details within a journal. By writing every action required items into your journal, you will have more freedom from detaching yourself from all those pressures. He says keeping a journal is like a core dump which can act as your stress release and spiritual in-basket:

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Just making a free-form list of all the things you have attention on is a form of journaling and is at least momentarily liberating. On the most mundane level, it is capturing all of the “oh, yeah, I need to …” stuff—phone calls to make, things to get at the store, things to talk to your boss or your assistant about, etc. At this level, it doesn’t usually make for a very exciting or interesting experience—just a necessary one to clear the most obvious cargo on the deck.

I often use my journal for “core-dumping” the subtler and more ambiguous things rattling around in my psyche. It’s like doing a current-reality inventory of the things that really have my attention—the big blips on my internal radar. These can be either negative or positive, like relationship issues, career decisions or unexpected events that have created disturbances or new opportunities. Sometimes core-dumping is the best way to get started when nothing else is flowing—just an objectification of what is on my internal landscape.

This is a key point that David has emphasized in his book Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity – and it is one of the effective tools that I use daily.

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Finding Your Inside Time – [Writers Digest]

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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