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Yes, No, or Maybe…?

Yes, No, or Maybe…?
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    Always remember that you are at least 50% smarter than computers. Computers know ‘yes’ and ‘no,’ but we know ‘maybe.’” – John Pironti

    When it comes to where you direct your energy, it involves just three simple answers – yes, no, or maybe. Think about it. Every decision you make – voluntary or otherwise, involves a “yes,” a “no,” or a “maybe.” Okay, common sense, right?

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    But are you considering those answers before you make a decision?

    A lot of people say “yes” to something without really thinking it through. The same goes for those saying “no.” If you are the type who always tends to want to jump in and help, you probably blurt out a “yes” before you think through what the request entails. If you prefer to stick to your own tasks, you may say “no” without really judging what’s being asked.

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    Are you a Yes Person, a No Person, or do you say “maybe”…?

    When it comes to productivity and your own personal development, there are pros and cons to both yes and no answers. Adrian posted an excellent view of why saying “yes” more often can be beneficial, and saying “no” may help you take back your time. People who always say “yes” may get taken advantage of. Those who always say “no,” may be considered selfish or not helpful. Neither one is bad, if you make sure you are consciously directing where you put your time and effort. And that’s the key, consciously

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    The third path

    I had a mentor years ago who said always answer with a “maybe” response. It could be “hmm…let me think that over,” or “that might work, let me check my schedule.” Going with a “maybe” gives you time to think about what the request actually involves, and whether you want to put your energy towards it.

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    Now some of you might be thinking “duh, everyone does that.” The thing is, most don’t. If you do, wonderful, you’ve got a good handle to being consciously aware of where you direct your energy. But many people struggle with this.

    So next time you’re put on the spot, instead of going with your usual “yes” or “no” answer, use a “maybe.” The take some time to mull over the choice. It’s your time and energy. Using it in a way that can both benefit you and help others is a nice balance to achieve.

    What do think – yes, no, or maybe…?

    Tony D. Clark writes, draws cartoons, designs software and websites, and spends a lot of time talking others into working from home, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest helps people to design and run a home-based business that is in line with their unique gifts, values, personality, and world-view – all served up with humor and cartoons.

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    Last Updated on October 9, 2018

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    Most of you made personal, one sentence resolutions like “I want to lose weight” or “I vow to go back to school.” It is a tradition to start the New Year with things you want to achieve, but under the influence resolutions are often unrealistic.

    If you’re wondering when will be a good time to write a mission statement, NOW is the time to take a personal inventory to make this year your most productive year ever. You may be asking yourself, “How am I going to do that?” You, my friends, are going to write personal mission statements.

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    A large number of corporations use mission statements to define the purpose of the company’s existence. Sony wants to “become the company most known for changing the worldwide poor-quality image of Japanese products” and 3M wants “to solve unsolved problems innovatively”. A personal mission statement is different than a corporate mission statement, but the fundamentals are the same.

    So why do you need one? A personal statement will help you identify your core values and beliefs in one fluid tapestry of content that you can read anytime and anywhere to stay on task toward success.

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    For example, Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire came to the realization that he had lost track of what was important to him. After writing a personal mission statement, we saw him start his own business and he got the girl, Renee Zelleweger. Not bad, wouldn’t you say? A personal mission statement will make sure that, through all the texting, emailing and constant bombardment of on-the-go activity, you won’t lose sight of what is most important to you.

    Mission statements can be simple and concise while others are longer and filled with detail. The length of your personal mission statement will not be determined until you follow this simple equation to create your motivational springboard for 2008.

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    To begin your internal cleansing, you will need to jot down the required information in the following five steps:

    1. What are your values? Values steer your actions and determine where you spend time, energy, and most importantly, money. Be specific and unique to yourself. Too much generalization will not be as effective. It is called a “personal” mission statement for a reason.
    2. What are three important goals you hope to achieve this year? Keep your list of important goals small and give them a date. It is better to focus on the horizon and not the stars. Realistic goals are keys to ultimate success.
    3. What image do you hope to project to yourself? How you see yourself is how the world will view you. Think about this carefully. Your image should encompass what you look like and feel after you have achieved your goals.
    4. Write down action statements from each value describing how you will use those values to achieve your three goals. Start with “I will…”
    5. Rewrite your statement to include only your action statements. Make portable copies for your wallet, car or office.

    If you followed the steps above, congratulations! You have just written your first personal mission statement. Your personal statement will change over the years as your goals change. You can have more than one statement for the different compartments of your life such as your career, family, marriage, etc.

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    Writing a personal mission statement is an effective method to ensure your productivity is at its peak. It is an ideal tradition to start so that when next year rolls around, the outdated practice of resolutions will be something you permanently left in the past.

    Featured photo credit: Álvaro Serrano via unsplash.com

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