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Trial by Fire Productivity – The Intro

Trial by Fire Productivity – The Intro
Tools

    Launching a new project is extremely time-consuming. It’s at these times I begin to learn how effective my productivity process and tools really are.

    Since creating a 36-hour day is out of the question, the next best thing is making the hours you have more productive. Enter tools and processes.

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    The thing is, you can never know how well they’re going to work under real stress, until you’re in the middle of a firestorm. So I decided to run an experiment. Not in a controlled environment, but in a real-world situation – hectic and full-on.

    The Plan…

    Over the next 60 days, I will be preparing my new venture for launch. I have some aggressive time lines, plus existing commitments. In order to hit my goals, I need to be ultra-productive – and that means I’ll need some effective tools and processes.

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    But I’m starting clean.

    I’ve used so many different tools and methods over the years that tend to fail when I need them most. So this time, I have decided to go commando – so to speak.

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    I’m ditching everything in the way of tools and processes, but a few essentials – Google calendar, grid-lined spiral notebook, and Thunderbird. Then as I need something, I’m going to pick a tool and add it in.

    In order for it to work, I am setting a few criteria. I’m keeping it somewhat loose, since I’ll be adjusting as I go:

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    • Efficiency First – Above all, whatever I choose, it has to make my workflow more efficient. As a lifehack junkie, I could have the tendency to add a bunch of tools, based solely on the coolness factor. So my primary focus when deciding will be efficiency.
    • Instant Use – I won’t have time to read a manual or do a bunch of tutorials, so I have to be able to integrate it right away. This means it has to be extremely easy to use. Now, fortunately, I’m kind of a techie. So this may give me a little less of a learning curve.
    • Analog vs. Digital – I’ve used both paper and digital tools. I prefer simplicity, so sometimes that means paper, sometimes the convenience of data on a machine. I’ll be looking at both.
    • Cross Platform – I use both Windows and Linux, and at least 2 machines at a time. So whatever computer-based tool I use, it has to be able to be accessible from both, and preferably can share between them.
    • Cost – I’ve spent so much money over the years on stuff that I end up not using. For this experiment, I plan to use free or cheap tools – ideally open source, but ease of use and the other criteria may trump that.

    The Progress…

    Each week, I’ll post about a tool or process I’ve added and how well it’s integrated into my work-flow.

    At the end of the first 30 days, I may do a podcast or vodcast that covers some of the more useful things in more detail. It depends on how well this works, if I’ll have the time.

    In the end, I may be back to just grid paper and Google calendar. But I hope to find some useful tools that will help make my life as a home-based entrepreneur, easier.

    Tony D. Clark is an entrepreneur, writer, and artist who spends a lot of time talking others into profiting from what they know, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest provides inspiration, tips, and advice for the home-based entrepreneur and those aspiring to be one – all served up with humor and cartoons.

    More by this author

    Your Perception IS Your Reality Ultimate Pros and Cons Excel Workbook Lifehack.org Podcast Episode 7 – Trial By Fire Productivity Episode 2: Leon Ho Getting to Plumb How Do You Woo the Muse?

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    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

    1. Zoho Notebook
      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
    2. Evernote
      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
    3. Net Notes
      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
    4. i-Lighter
      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
    5. Clipmarks
      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
    6. UberNote
      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
    7. iLeonardo
      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
    8. Zotero
      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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