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Trial By Fire Productivity – Brainstorming And High Level Planning Tools

Trial By Fire Productivity – Brainstorming And High Level Planning Tools
Mindmap

    This post is part of the Trial By Fire Productivity series.

    I plan in my head.

    Back when I was getting started as a freelance designer, I waited tables to help pay the bills. I was one of those waiters that kept orders in his head. I never wrote them down, and very rarely made a mistake. It was when I tried to write things down that I got slowed down, and screwed orders up. Instead, I’d take the order, absorbing every detail, and then go dump it into the system. That worked for me.

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    Keeping things in my RAM is how I work best. I learned to work with it, rather than try to conform to another process. So when it comes to brainstorming and high level planning tools, I need a quick and dirty solution. It also has to have the flexibility to become the framework for a larger plan, if it is needed.

    My favorite planning tool has always been an 11×17 grid pad, and a Sharpie. This is what I start with for business plans, seminar and workshop planning, interface design, and graphic design.

    I’ve also looked at the Levenger planning pads, but for the price, I like a cheap grid pad. To me it’s more of a true “throw-away” solution. So I can free-plan, and not feel obligated to perfect things.

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    For planning on the computer, I’ve mostly used FreeMind. It’s written in Java, so I can use it on both WinXP and Linux.

    I also recently received an invitation to the beta for MindMeister, and have been trying it out. I like it because I can easily share between computers and platforms, since it’s Web-based:

    MindMeister brings the concept of mind mapping to the web, using its facilities for real-time collaboration to allow truly global brainstorming sessions.

    Users can create, manage and share mind maps online and access them anytime, from anywhere. In brainstorming mode, fellow MindMeisters from around the world (or just in different rooms) can simultaneously work on the same mind map – and see each other’s changes as they happen. Using integrated Skype calls, they can throw around new ideas and put them down on “paper” at the same time.

    For simple plans, it’s perfect. It’s easy to use and even in beta, feels very stable. (I have 20 invitations to the beta, if you would like to give it a try. Let me know in the comments, and be sure to use a valid email address, because that’s where the invitations will go. I’ll send them out on a first come, first serve basis.)

    The Verdict: At least for the duration of this experiment I will use a large grid pad and either FreeMind or MindMeister. Right now, I’m leaning towards MindMeister, because it’s Web-based and was available this week when I had a hard drive crash. Being able to access things from any computer definitely has its perks.

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    Alternatives: For paper planning, there’s Levenger Oasis Isometric Pads and Oasis Concept Pads. These are really nice and perfect for a little more structured approach. I’ve also been playing with the Project Emphasis template from the D*I*Y Planner Kit. For computer-based high level planning, there are tons of tools available – commercial, free, and open source. Some have a lot more features and are more robust, but I prefer simple and basic. For another look at Web-based mind mapping tools (including MindMeister) Anne Zelenka has a review of 3 over at Web Worker Daily.

    Other Entries in this Series

    Tony D. Clark is an entrepreneur, writer, and artist who spends a lot of time talking others into profiting from what they know, being creative, and doing what they love. His blog Success from the Nest provides inspiration, tips, and advice for the home-based entrepreneur and those aspiring to be one – all served up with humor and cartoons.

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    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

    1. Zoho Notebook
      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
    2. Evernote
      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
    3. Net Notes
      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
    4. i-Lighter
      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
    5. Clipmarks
      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
    6. UberNote
      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
    7. iLeonardo
      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
    8. Zotero
      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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