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The Crackberry: A Corporate Noose or Time Leveraging Tool

The Crackberry: A Corporate Noose or Time Leveraging Tool
Blackberry

    For better or for worse the Crackberry is here to stay. Once only reserved for techies, the Crackberry is now a mainstay in the corporate environment, allowing professionals to quickly access information and communicate with others on the go. They’ve become extremely popular among sales people, techies, lawyers, accountants and political assistants. Some CEOs use them but the people who are the most productive don’t seem to have them.

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    Originally touted as a personal productivity machine, the Crackberry is quickly becoming a time trap and the corporate drug of choice. If you have one, think about how many times you check your Crackberry in a day. Once, twice, or hundreds of times a day? Try counting. A lot of managers like to get their staff onto them so they can more easily intrude on their personal lives.

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    Employers, co-workers and clients expect more access to your personal time and expect emails responses in minutes and not hours. To compound this problem, with many features and software add-ons, there is a tendency to spend excessive time doing non-productive activities like playing cards on the Crackberry. In the end, this leaves you with less time to meet your deadlines and spend with your family or friends.

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    Here are 10 ways you can turn your Crackberry from a corporate noose to a time leveraging tool.

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    • Load only applications that you need.
    • Turn off your Crackberry when you are in meetings.
    • Turn off your Crackberry when you are working on a file or project.
    • Allow only important clients and co-workers to have access to your Crackberry email.
    • Budget non-work time to play with your Crackberry.
    • Stop walking and typing at the same time.
    • Turn off your Crackberry during downtime.
    • Save those long emails for the office.
    • Set a Crackberry use policy and stick to it.
    • Start a Crackberries Anonymous group.

    In other words, find a way not to check your Crackberry every second. If you can manage to do this, you are on your way to recovery. If you come across any other suggestions, please add them in the comment section below. If not handled right, these things can become so unproductive, it is not funny.

    Tatsuya Nakagawa is president and CEO of Atomica Creative Group Ltd., a strategic product marketing company based in Vancouver Canada. He has assisted numerous companies in diverse industries with their early stage deployments and product launches in North America, Europe and Asia. He ditched his Crackberry in January after having been on it for a year. Peter Paul Roosen has an engineering background and founded numerous companies including firms involved in locomotive and plastics manufacturing, computer software and marketing. He never got a Crackberry and still uses an old school notebook for organizing stuff.

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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