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Readers Recommend: 15 More Productivity Blogs You Probably Never Heard Of

Readers Recommend: 15 More Productivity Blogs You Probably Never Heard Of

The Path Less Traveled By

    Last week, I recommended over 60 productivity blogs, from the big name sites to some of the little-known discoveries I’d made in my travels through the productivity Web. At the end, I asked readers to recommend the sites that they’d come across that they felt deserved wider recognition, and this is what you came up with.

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    1. Aim for Awesome: Vern Lovic shares his simple recipe for life (“smiles + smarts + success”) with an odd but interesting mix of high technology and spiritual seeking.
    2. Avani Mehta: Avani Mehta offers “Food for Mind”, with posts on motivation, stress and relaxation, and “mind hacks”.
    3. Chief Happiness Officer: Alexander Kjerulf answers questions, shares tips, reviews books, and indulges in a little bit of silliness on this blog dedicated to living happily ever after – and today.
    4. Encouraging Greatness: Jeff Hurley focuses on office relations, with tips and tricks for coaxing success from any staff.
    5. Effing the Dog: A blog and podcast offering a not-so-slightly offbeat take on productivity: Eventualism, which as far as I can make out, holds that eventually everything gets done. Filled with interviews of productivity greats (that he eventually gets posted…).
    6. Get Everything Done: The blog of Mark Forster, author of Do It Tomorrow and other books on personal productivity and time managment. Here he offers tips and motivation for more productive living.
    7. Lesson In Life: Mohamad Zaki, known as “banji”, shares his lessons on living, with posts on self-motivation, attitude adjustment, studying kills, and related topics.
    8. On Simplicity: Sara shares her findings in her quest for “a happier, easier, more enjoyable life”. Contains a pretty even mix of practical advice and inspiring thought-pieces.
    9. Productive Flourishing: Charlie Gilkey’s blog is notable for his philosophical approach to just living, as well as his free downloadable monthly planner pages.
    10. Sneak Up On Your Dreams: Aileen Journey discusses how to make and achieve your goals in little steps on this new but promising site.
    11. Study Matrix Blog: A unique site dedicated to exploring the potential of a kind of mind map known as a “study matrix”. Gorgeously illustrated, there’s lots of useful information here for people interested in learning how to explore and represent ideas visually.
    12. Success Making Machine: Heshy Shayovitz presents his “life management system” – along the way touching on topics related to productivity and effective management.
    13. Team Taskmaster: This BNET blog cy CC Holland is geared towards office workers, with an emphasis on workplace relations and other issues.
    14. YangTown: A spiritual blog for men, this site is Ryan Randolph’s attempt to forge a new concept of masculinty. Scroll down – all the content was below my browser window when I visited!
    15. Zen College Life: Ibrahim Husain presents the technology news, health and fitness tips, study advice, and life knowledge students need to succeed at college – and life.

    Thanks to everyone who recommended sites – even if they were your own. There are a lot of sites here that I plan on subscribing to – and a few I wouldn’t, but that’s the beauty of the Web: there’s plenty for everyone.

    My larger list last week drew quite a few comments from people complaining about the length of the list. I’ve grown to expect the refrain of “you’re a productivity site, how can a huge list be good for productivity” on any post with more than a few ideas in it, but I suppose it’s a valid complaint and deserves to be addressed.

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    First of all, I haven’t exactly hid my feelings about productivity – it’s a lot more than work work work. Some of these sites provide useful, immediately applicable information – and some provide inspiration, spiritual instruction, or just plain fun. Some I read every day, and some I read once a week or less – and some I visit just every so often, when I feel like it. Some are essential reading for the advice they give, and some are occasional reading to snuggle up with on a long afternoon with nothing else pressing.

    Second of all, I don’t expect anyone to read all of these sites. I don’t read all of them – and many I only read occasionally, as I said! I fully expect that some of you will absolutely loathe some of my recommendations – the author is too arrogant, too spiritual, too feminine, too masculine, too money-centric, too self-righteous, too whatever. Others might find the same site exactly what they’ve always looked for. This is not an all-or-nothing affair – by all means, pick and choose the ones that work for you.

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    Finally, on a different note, if you write one of these sites, we’d love to hear from you. Maybe you’d like to join Lifehack as an ongoing guest contributor, or submit an occasional guest post. What has become especially clear to me in the year-plus at Lifehack (last week marked my one-year anniversary as a Lifehack writer) is that there’s a huge community of people out there seeking ways to better themselves and their lives.

    But that community is somewhat disjointed, scattered into tiny niches (student life blogs, management and leadership blogs, make money online bogs, and on and on).

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    Let’s start changing that – let’s open up some lines of communication and see what we can achieve if we start building relationships amongst ourselves!

    If you’re interested and have any ideas, contact us or email me directly at dustin (at) lifehack dot org.

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    Last Updated on November 5, 2019

    How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

    How to Cultivate Continuous Learning to Stay Competitive

    Assuming the public school system didn’t crush your soul, learning is a great activity. It expands your viewpoint. It gives you new knowledge you can use to improve your life. It is important for your personal growth. Even if you discount the worldly benefits, the act of learning can be a source of enjoyment.

    “I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.” — Mark Twain

    But in a busy world, it can often be hard to fit in time to learn anything that isn’t essential. The only things learned are those that need to be. Everything beyond that is considered frivolous. Even those who do appreciate the practice of lifelong learning, can find it difficult to make the effort.

    Here are some tips for installing the habit of continuous learning:

    1. Always Have a Book

    It doesn’t matter if it takes you a year or a week to read a book. Always strive to have a book that you are reading through, and take it with you so you can read it when you have time.

    Just by shaving off a few minutes in-between activities in my day I can read about a book per week. That’s at least fifty each year.

    2. Keep a “To-Learn” List

    We all have to-do lists. These are the tasks we need to accomplish. Try to also have a “to-learn” list. On it you can write ideas for new areas of study.

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    Maybe you would like to take up a new language, learn a skill or read the collective works of Shakespeare. Whatever motivates you, write it down.

    3. Get More Intellectual Friends

    Start spending more time with people who think. Not just people who are smart, but people who actually invest much of their time in learning new skills. Their habits will rub off on you.

    Even better, they will probably share some of their knowledge with you.

    4. Guided Thinking

    Albert Einstein once said,

    “Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.”

    Simply studying the wisdom of others isn’t enough, you have to think through ideas yourself. Spend time journaling, meditating or contemplating over ideas you have learned.

    5. Put it Into Practice

    Skill based learning is useless if it isn’t applied. Reading a book on C++ isn’t the same thing as writing a program. Studying painting isn’t the same as picking up a brush.

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    If your knowledge can be applied, put it into practice.

    In this information age, we’re all exposed to a lot of information, it’s important to re-learn how to learn so as to put the knowledge into practice.

    6. Teach Others

    You learn what you teach. If you have an outlet of communicating ideas to others, you are more likely to solidify that learning.

    Start a blog, mentor someone or even discuss ideas with a friend.

    7. Clean Your Input

    Some forms of learning are easy to digest, but often lack substance.

    I make a point of regularly cleaning out my feed reader for blogs I subscribe to. Great blogs can be a powerful source of new ideas. But every few months, I realize I’m collecting posts from blogs that I am simply skimming.

    Every few months, purify your input to save time and focus on what counts.

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    8. Learn in Groups

    Lifelong learning doesn’t mean condemning yourself to a stack of dusty textbooks. Join organizations that teach skills.

    Workshops and group learning events can make educating yourself a fun, social experience.

    9. Unlearn Assumptions

    You can’t add water to a full cup. I always try to maintain a distance away from any idea. Too many convictions simply mean too few paths for new ideas.

    Actively seek out information that contradicts your worldview.

    Our minds can’t be trusted, but this is what we can do about it to be wiser.

    10. Find Jobs that Encourage Learning

    Pick a career that encourages continual learning. If you are in a job that doesn’t have much intellectual freedom, consider switching to one that does.

    Don’t spend forty hours of your week in a job that doesn’t challenge you.

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    11. Start a Project

    Set out to do something you don’t know how. Forced learning in this way can be fun and challenging.

    If you don’t know anything about computers, try building one. If you consider yourself a horrible artist, try a painting.

    12. Follow Your Intuition

    Lifelong learning is like wandering through the wilderness. You can’t be sure what to expect and there isn’t always an end goal in mind.

    Letting your intuition guide you can make self-education more enjoyable. Most of our lives have been broken down to completely logical decisions, that making choices on a whim has been stamped out.

    13. The Morning Fifteen

    Productive people always wake up early. Use the first fifteen minutes of your morning as a period for education.

    If you find yourself too groggy, you might want to wait a short time. Just don’t put it off later in the day where urgent activities will push it out of the way.

    14. Reap the Rewards

    Learn information you can use. Understanding the basics of programming allows me to handle projects that other people would require outside help. Meeting a situation that makes use of your educational efforts can be a source of pride.

    15. Make Learning a Priority

    Few external forces are going to persuade you to learn. The desire has to come from within. Once you decide you want to make lifelong learning a habit, it is up to you to make it a priority in your life.

    More About Continuous Learning

    Featured photo credit: Paul Schafer via unsplash.com

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