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Promote Yourself! Seeking Sponsors for Our Great Big Summer Giveaway

Promote Yourself! Seeking Sponsors for Our Great Big Summer Giveaway

Promote Yourself!

    It’s summertime, and the living is easy. Your daddy is rich and your ma is good looking. What could be better?

    How about a Great Big Summer Giveaway here a Lifehack? We’re organizing a big shindig for August, just in time for Back to School and the Christmas rush, when pulling it together for the crazy fall is on everyone’s mind.

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    Do you or your company have a product or service that can help people become more productive, better organized, stronger leaders, more financially secure, or happier and better balanced?

    If so, we’d like to invite you to become a sponsor of our Great Big Summer Giveaway by offering a prize or two for our readers.

    What are we looking for?

    If you read Lifehack, you already know people read Lifehack to find out how to work and live better, more efficiently, and with less stress. Any product or service that helps them achieve those goals is welcome: books, lecture CDs, consulting services, software, desk supplies, office equipment, home organizing tools, style and fashion items – and probably dozens of other things I haven’t even thought of. If you’re a retailer, of course, gift certificates or store credit make great prizes, too.

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    What’s in it for you?

    Lifehack has well over 60,000 subscribers and tens of thousands of site visitors every day. You’ll be putting your name and a description of your product or service in front of hundreds of thousands of readers, all of whom are interested in what you do.

    We’ll be running several posts related to the Great Big Summer Giveaway in the run-up to the contest and during the contest itself. In addition to getting your information in front of readers each time, your site will be linked to from a top-ranked site, one related to your niche – repeatedly.

    And of course you’ll be earning the gratitude and goodwill of Lifehack and its readers – no small thing, that.

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    Here’s what Brian Reeder of db clay wallets had to say about his company’s sponsorship of our giveaways in January:

    Working with Lifehack.org has been a great experience for db clay. We have seen great results from the giveaway; our sales, traffic, and conversion rate all saw a significant increase because of the consistent quality posts. We continue to see residual sales from this giveaway. I would (and plan to) absolutely work with Leon, Dustin, and the great folks at Lifehack again.

    In the wake of our January giveaways, db clay saw a 233% increase in sales over the previous year.

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    What do you have to do to get involved?

    If you’d like to be a sponsor for this giveaway, get in touch with us via the site contact form. Let us know who you are, what prize(s) you’d like to offer, and the approximate dollar value of the prize(s). Also include a short description – around 50 words – that we can use in posts promoting the contest. If there are any limitations, such as not being able to ship to certain countries, please let us know that, too.

    Because we want each sponsor to enjoy the maximum exposure for their brand and products, we cannot accept every sponsorship offer. If your product or service is appropriate for Lifehack’s audience, we may ask you to participate in future giveaways where you can receive the attention you deserve.

    If you have any questions, please let us know. We’re hoping to put together a great giveaway, something our readers, our sponsors, and we at Lifehack can get really excited about. We’d love for you to be part of it!

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    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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