Advertising
Advertising

Productivity Karma: Be Good, Or Your Actions Will Come Back to Bite You

Productivity Karma: Be Good, Or Your Actions Will Come Back to Bite You

    Often when an individual decides to fix up that area of their life that has to do with getting things done, they make extensive changes to themselves; the way they act, the way the run their lives, the way they behave and communicate with others. And sometimes, the “productivity machine” — that is, the massive industry out there that promises to tell you how to solve all your problems with time and tasks — turns these people from happy, friendly people, into… well, I’m sure that kind of language is uncalled for here. Let’s just say selfish, hmm?

    Karma usually bites these people in the backside.

    This isn’t karma in some mystical sense. This is purely logical and practical. If you exhibit certain behaviors and patterns in your communications with others, you’re saying, “This is okay, this is fine. You can do this too.”

    And yet, people who are trying to get more done in less time make these mistakes, and usually (perhaps even hopefully?) end up paying the price. Make sure you’re not making them yourself, or we won’t feel sorry for you when the world comes crashing in on you with pitchforks and knives!

    Advertising

    Don’t be brief to the point of rudeness when you’re trying to save time on email.

    If an email crosses your inbox that may be about a subject that the sender finds sensitive, then it can be pretty rude to reply in the curt and brief manner that most of us try to adopt. That’s not to say you’ve got to write a book to protect somebody’s oversensitivity, but it does mean you could throw in a simple, “Hope you’re doing well and know that I’m here to talk if you need it,” or whatever suits the situation, at the end.

    Of course, if you’re not here to talk, don’t say that. Be honest. But don’t be cruel.

    Your time is important, but it’s not more important than making someone’s day that much more bearable by investing a few more seconds into your communications.

    If you don’t want to be carbon copied on everything that goes on in your company, don’t carbon copy everybody else on irrelevant junk.

    Advertising

    Some people — usually the ones who skip the wealth of material available on effective email communication — figure that by CCing everybody in the company on their emails, they’ll have to repeat themselves less and things will get done faster.

    As I mentioned earlier, “karma” kicks in when you teach people how to deal with you through your own actions. Guess what? Those few people who weren’t copying you on their messages have certainly begun, because evidently you like having a good barrage of crap in your inbox to start the day with.

    Good luck getting anything done now!

    Don’t put your productivity above others to the point where you create more work for them in your own attempt to ditch it.

    This point here is similar to the notion that you create patterns when you exhibit patterns by breaking the rules you would impose, but the difference is that this is more malicious.

    Advertising

    Some of you might find it hard to believe, but more than a few people who have enjoyed the reduced burden and stress that occurs when you delegate a task to an employee, colleague or assistant (virtual or otherwise) decide they enjoy it so much they’ll create more work for others in their own attempt to ditch it. Not because it’s the other person’s job—but because they like the feeling of palming that task off and calling it “productivity.”

    If you do this, you suck. Plain and simple.

    I’m sure you’re starting to get the point.

    At the end of the day, it comes down to not piling other people up with work that isn’t their work just to save yourself some time, and following the same policies you ask of others when you’re communicating with them. That’s generally called “etiquette,” “manners,” and other various things my rather cynical soul says are rare in our society.

    I sum it up this way:

    Advertising

    Don’t forget others on your road to productivity.

    Sometimes productivity advice leads people into this mindset that their own time is more important than other people’s time. That’s not to say you shouldn’t hold your time as sacred and fiercely defend it when it is preyed upon. You certainly should, because other people are the number two enemy of true productivity (the first being yourself, of course). But it’s too easy to forget that other people have work to do and lives to live and, in an effort to save yourself some time, cause a major inconvenience on someone else who has their plate full at work and a family to attend to (and even, perhaps, if they’re lucky, enjoy) when they get home.

    The constant pursuit of productivity can sometimes get so misguided that it brings us to a point of selfishness and malicious action. Ask yourself this when you feel you may be going down this path: why did I decide to improve this area of my life called productivity in the first place?

    In my experience, disregard for others in the pursuit of a goal is usually the result of losing sight of the motivations behind that goal. I don’t know exactly why this disconnect prompts this behavior in people, but it comes down to the means becoming more important than the ends. The ends are the motivation for the means, and the means is nothing more than a way of achieving that.

    It can go both ways, though. As that irritatingly cliched saying goes, the ends don’t justify the means.

    Be a good productivity geek this week. Earn yourself some positive productivity karma.

    More by this author

    How to Make Decisions Under Pressure 11 Free Mind Mapping Applications & Web Services How to Use Parkinson’s Law to Your Advantage 19 Free GTD Apps for Windows, Mac & Linux 32 Hacks for Sticking to Your Budget

    Trending in Featured

    1 How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity 2 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 3 How to Get Promoted When You Feel Stuck in Your Current Position 4 How to Become an Expert (And Spot out One Nearby) 5 How to Find Your Passion and Live a Fulfilling Life

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on October 9, 2018

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    How to Write a Personal Mission Statement to Ensure Peak Productivity

    Most of you made personal, one sentence resolutions like “I want to lose weight” or “I vow to go back to school.” It is a tradition to start the New Year with things you want to achieve, but under the influence resolutions are often unrealistic.

    If you’re wondering when will be a good time to write a mission statement, NOW is the time to take a personal inventory to make this year your most productive year ever. You may be asking yourself, “How am I going to do that?” You, my friends, are going to write personal mission statements.

    Advertising

    A large number of corporations use mission statements to define the purpose of the company’s existence. Sony wants to “become the company most known for changing the worldwide poor-quality image of Japanese products” and 3M wants “to solve unsolved problems innovatively”. A personal mission statement is different than a corporate mission statement, but the fundamentals are the same.

    So why do you need one? A personal statement will help you identify your core values and beliefs in one fluid tapestry of content that you can read anytime and anywhere to stay on task toward success.

    Advertising

    For example, Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire came to the realization that he had lost track of what was important to him. After writing a personal mission statement, we saw him start his own business and he got the girl, Renee Zelleweger. Not bad, wouldn’t you say? A personal mission statement will make sure that, through all the texting, emailing and constant bombardment of on-the-go activity, you won’t lose sight of what is most important to you.

    Mission statements can be simple and concise while others are longer and filled with detail. The length of your personal mission statement will not be determined until you follow this simple equation to create your motivational springboard for 2008.

    Advertising

    To begin your internal cleansing, you will need to jot down the required information in the following five steps:

    1. What are your values? Values steer your actions and determine where you spend time, energy, and most importantly, money. Be specific and unique to yourself. Too much generalization will not be as effective. It is called a “personal” mission statement for a reason.
    2. What are three important goals you hope to achieve this year? Keep your list of important goals small and give them a date. It is better to focus on the horizon and not the stars. Realistic goals are keys to ultimate success.
    3. What image do you hope to project to yourself? How you see yourself is how the world will view you. Think about this carefully. Your image should encompass what you look like and feel after you have achieved your goals.
    4. Write down action statements from each value describing how you will use those values to achieve your three goals. Start with “I will…”
    5. Rewrite your statement to include only your action statements. Make portable copies for your wallet, car or office.

    If you followed the steps above, congratulations! You have just written your first personal mission statement. Your personal statement will change over the years as your goals change. You can have more than one statement for the different compartments of your life such as your career, family, marriage, etc.

    Advertising

    Writing a personal mission statement is an effective method to ensure your productivity is at its peak. It is an ideal tradition to start so that when next year rolls around, the outdated practice of resolutions will be something you permanently left in the past.

    Featured photo credit: Álvaro Serrano via unsplash.com

    Read Next