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Prefer Paper Planners? 3 Best Calendars You’ve Never Heard Of

Prefer Paper Planners?  3 Best Calendars You’ve Never Heard Of
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Professional Organizers are often called upon to help our clients choose the calendar that is best for their needs. Many times, even though people are very digitally-oriented in their work, they still prefer having a paper calendar. Paper planners provide the benefit of immediate gratification—there is no waiting to boot up or fumble around with “toothpick typing.” You can just write something in and keep going. People also enjoy being able to carry other papers inside the planner, such as receipts and airline tickets and the like.

Lots of people are familiar with the FranklinCovey® planners, Day-Timer®, or Day Runner® brands, but there are other paper calendars out there that deserve mention as well.

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WeekDate

One of the common drawbacks of using a paper calendar is having to write recurring events repeatedly, and then, of course, you have the hassle of erasing and updating all of them when something changes. One calendar has changed all of that. WeekDate is one of the most creative things I have seen in a while. You write in all of your monthly recurring appointments, all of your weekly recurring appointments, and then all of your specific day appointments on different folded-in “flaps” of the calendar itself, so that you can view them all at once and have no need to rewrite things.

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WeekDate


    Planner Pads

    Another paper planner that gets rave reviews is the Planner Pad. They have been around for 30 years and they offer a six-month guarantee on their product. They have a unique design that provides a funnel of tasks and activities on a two-page view of the week, starting with higher-level projects, then daily activities, then daily appointments. The Planner Pad really helps people manage lists better in conjunction with their daily schedule.

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    Book Triangle

      Whomi

      The Whomi (as in “Who, me? Organized?”) helps people who are managing multiple schedules, such as a mother with her various children’s activities. You can track your own schedule along with 3 other people, such as two children and a spouse. It provides an easy-to-read color-coded view of the week for tracking each person’s whereabouts and activities. They have even made perforated corners so you can tear off the corners of previous weeks and tab over to the current week quickly. They have a checkbook-sized planner, a larger planner, and a wall calendar, all with this same color-coded, multiple schedule format.

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      Whomi Weekly

        Some people will always prefer an electronic calendar such as Outlook, but it’s nice to know that we have more creative paper solutions available for those who prefer a low-tech option.

        Lorie Marrero is a Professional Organizer and creator of The Clutter Diet, an innovative, affordable online program for home organization. Lorie’s site helps members lose “Clutter-Pounds” from their homes by providing online access to her team of organizers. Lorie writes something insanely practical every few days or so in the Clutter Diet Blog. She lives in Austin, TX, where her company has provided hands-on organizing services to clients since 2000.

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        6 Reasons to Keep Receipts…Or Not! Prefer Paper Planners? 3 Best Calendars You’ve Never Heard Of Organizing Saves You Money: 8 Valuable Opportunities The Seven Essential “Stations” Every Home Should Have Five Common Working-At-Home Problems- Solved!

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        Last Updated on November 18, 2020

        15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

        15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)
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        It’s okay, you can finally admit it. It’s been two months since you’ve seen the inside of the gym. Getting sick, family crisis, overtime at work and school papers that needed to get finished all kept you for exercising. Now, the question is: how do you start again?
        Once you have an exercise habit, it becomes automatic. You just go to the gym, there is no force involved. But after a month, two months or possibly a year off, it can be hard to get started again. Here are some tips to climb back on that treadmill after you’ve fallen off.

        1. Don’t Break the Habit – The easiest way to keep things going is simply not to stop. Avoid long breaks in exercising or rebuilding the habit will take some effort. This may be advice a little too late for some people. But if you have an exercise habit going, don’t drop it at the first sign of trouble.
        2. Reward Showing Up – Woody Allen once said that, “Half of life is showing up.” I’d argue that 90% of making a habit is just making the effort to get there. You can worry about your weight, amount of laps you run or the amount you can bench press later.
        3. Commit for Thirty Days – Make a commitment to go every day (even just for 20 minutes) for one month. This will solidify the exercise habit. By making a commitment you also take pressure off yourself in the first weeks back of deciding whether to go.
        4. Make it Fun – If you don’t enjoy yourself at the gym, it is going to be hard to keep it a habit. There are thousands of ways you can move your body and exercise, so don’t give up if you’ve decided lifting weights or doing crunches isn’t for you. Many large fitness centers will offer a range of programs that can suit your tastes.
        5. Schedule During Quiet Hours – Don’t put exercise time in a place where it will easily be pushed aside by something more important. Right after work or first thing in the morning are often good places to put it. Lunch-hour workouts might be too easy to skip if work demands start mounting.
        6. Get a Buddy – Grab a friend to join you. Having a social aspect to exercising can boost your commitment to the exercise habit.
        7. X Your Calendar – One person I know has the habit of drawing a red “X” through any day on the calendar he goes to the gym. The benefit of this is it quickly shows how long it has been since you’ve gone to the gym. Keeping a steady amount of X’s on your calendar is an easy way to motivate yourself.
        8. Enjoyment Before Effort – After you finish any work out, ask yourself what parts you enjoyed and what parts you did not. As a rule, the enjoyable aspects of your workout will get done and the rest will be avoided. By focusing on how you can make workouts more enjoyable, you can make sure you want to keep going to the gym.
        9. Create a Ritual – Your workout routine should become so ingrained that it becomes a ritual. This means that the time of day, place or cue automatically starts you towards grabbing your bag and heading out. If your workout times are completely random, it will be harder to benefit from the momentum of a ritual.
        10. Stress Relief – What do you do when your stressed? Chances are it isn’t running. But exercise can be a great way to relieve stress, releasing endorphin which will improve your mood. The next time you feel stressed or tired, try doing an exercise you enjoy. When stress relief is linked to exercise, it is easy to regain the habit even after a leave of absence.
        11. Measure Fitness – Weight isn’t always the best number to track. Increase in muscle can offset decreases in fat so the scale doesn’t change even if your body is. But fitness improvements are a great way to stay motivated. Recording simple numbers such as the number of push-ups, sit-ups or speed you can run can help you see that the exercise is making you stronger and faster.
        12. Habits First, Equipment Later – Fancy equipment doesn’t create a habit for exercise. Despite this, some people still believe that buying a thousand dollar machine will make up for their inactivity. It won’t. Start building the exercise habit first, only afterwards should you worry about having a personal gym.
        13. Isolate Your Weakness – If falling off the exercise wagon is a common occurrence for you, find out why. Do you not enjoy exercising? Is it a lack of time? Is it feeling self-conscious at the gym? Is it a lack of fitness know-how? As soon as you can isolate your weakness, you can make steps to improve the situation.
        14. Start Small – Trying to run fifteen miles your first workout isn’t a good way to build a habit. Work below your capacity for the first few weeks to build the habit. Otherwise you might scare yourself off after a brutal workout.
        15. Go for Yourself, Not to Impress – Going to the gym with the only goal of looking great is like starting a business with only the goal to make money. The effort can’t justify the results. But if you go to the gym to push yourself, gain energy and have a good time, then you can keep going even when results are slow.

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