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Power of Gratitude

Power of Gratitude
Pray

“We thank you for our daily bread” – People all over the world of varied religions thank the Lord on a daily basis in their prayers and actions. We teach our children to say thank you as soon as the little angles can talk. But do we understand what these two words really mean. Saying thank you and feeling gratitude may not be the same thing.

In today’s hectic and competitive world, there is so much negativity floating around that it is easy to get taken in by it. Pessimistic attitudes lead to chronic depressions and a negative mind is actually a magnet for ailments and sadness. We often complain about what we do not have and take for granted what has been provided to us.

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All of us at some time or the other have felt let down, held on to a grudge or simply hated someone’s guts. Most of us feel that life has not been fair to us at some point or the other. Comparisons with those who we feel are doing better than us are inevitable and make us feel like we got the raw end of the deal.


“I was sorry that I did not have shoes till I saw a man with no feet”. This oft mentioned saying needs to be given some thought before we start to moan in self pity about what we do not have. So pick up the threads of your life and start feeling grateful for the things that you do have as opposed to moaning about what you do not have.

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The power of gratitude works on the brain. It helps release the negativity in our mind. All functions and feelings of our body are controlled by the brain. When we express gratitude for things our brain feels positive.

As we start to walk up this road, our spirits rise and we are filled with positive feelings that make us happy and content. Gratitude can actually help you combat diseases too. Most physiological diseases have their roots in unhappiness and depression. The body is more susceptible to ailments when one is feeling low and depressed. When we feel thankful for all that we have our self esteem rises. This in turn provides the body with strength to fight against ailments. A body that is fighting germs as well as depression and low self moral is like a country that is facing civil war as well as external attacks at the same time. Needless to say the defense gets divided. If the mind is calm the body can divert all its resources towards external attacks.

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But simply saying ‘thank you’ is not the answer. One must learn to feel gratitude deep inside. It is necessary to feel privileged and lucky to have the things that we are feeling thankful for.

Simply put the power of gratitude is the answer to most of our problems today. So the next time you are feeling low simply count your blessing, one by one.

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Vishal P. Rao runs the Stress Management Forum, a place to discuss strategies and techniques to manage stress in daily life.

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Last Updated on September 17, 2018

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

Why do I have bad luck?

Let me let you into a secret:

Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

“I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

“Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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