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Pick Your Urgencies

Pick Your Urgencies

    How many times have you heard from your coworkers, friends and yourself the old line about being too busy fighting alligators to drain the swamp? How often does your life seem to be a car crash of intersecting urgencies?

    It’s easy to get sucked into a business culture where everything is urgent, everything is a priority. You start your new job and on day one you’re thrown into crisis mode meeting hell. The next time you realize you’ve never been out of crisis mode at work, three years have gone by.

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    There’s a whole genre of management books about how to instill urgency, crisis mode thinking and above all fear in your underlings. The basic premise hasn’t changed since slaves toiled away raising pyramids to the glory of their masters: crack the whip, execute a few slackers and the rest will get their butts in gear.

    Then there’s Mainstream Media feeding on crises – large and small, real and contrived. From 9/11 to a car crash on the other side of the world, mainstream media will be there – if there’s video – to bring you the crises of the day, the hour, the news segment. Because while fearful people used to run away from their lords and masters into the forest, they now run to the mall or box store and go shopping. Fear sells. Fear and contrived urgency as recent history has shown makes it easy to get people to do things they don’t want to do for the benefit of the people controlling – managing – the fear.

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    So, let’s get to particulars here: who is creating, managing or exploiting crises in your life and why?

    • It could be your boss who dumps a must have it or die assignment on your desk on his or her way out the door.
    • It could be traditional media who feed on tragedy, fear and blood to generate advertising revenue (I speak from experience).
    • It could be your local, state or federal “public servants” who a long time ago realized no one would fire their asses if we were “in a crisis”.
    • It could be interest groups and policy influences on the right, left or up and down who want more of your attention, money and fear for their crisis.
    • It could be boyfriend, girlfriend, wife or husband who makes crises big and small like popcorn to keep you hopping.

    And now for the nasty sharp point of this post: what are you going to do about it?

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    • You could do nothing. (That’s worked so well, hasn’t it?)
    • You could go berserk and smash your job, your relationship, your government, your television. Then you become the crisis and you will get handled forthwith.
    • Or you could decide there’s more than a little wisdom in the saying “Your crisis doesn’t equal my urgency” and stop automatically buying into every crisis your boss, client, spouse or government offers.

    Pick and choose your crises. Pick and choose whether to add to your stress and subtract from your life.

    Make no mistake there are real crises that are worth your best and fastest efforts – your house is on fire, global climate change (same thing, only bigger), to name two. But start exercising your right as a human being to decide for yourself what is a real crisis, what is urgent and what crisis is propaganda, spin and lie.

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    Bob Walsh sells MasterList Professional, a Windows task management application and writes, codes,
    podcasts and blogs about different aspects of the digital lifestyle at ToDoOrElse, MyMicroISV and Clear Blogging. His second book, Clear Blogging, is now available at Amazon and elsewhere.

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    Last Updated on October 16, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

    How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

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    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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