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Pick a number: It can simplify your life

Pick a number: It can simplify your life
Number 3

So, what does Jerry Seinfeld and a typical sales person have in common? A focus on a key number. Seinfeld always needed new jokes so early in his career he used a calendar and a big red marker to cross out each day he sat down for a session to write new material. He needed one session per day and made sure every day on his calendar was marked. His number “1” helped him to become number 1 in his area. Anyone working in sales is quite familiar with “meeting the number”, whatever that number is for his or her manager or company.

We often over-think and over-complicate the methods we use for achieving our goals. A great way to achieve our goals is to define a key number and use that as our motivator, measuring stick or target. Here are some examples of how a simple number can positively impact goals and likelihood of achieving them. Use whatever number you want to relate to whatever is important to you. The examples relate to simple numbers (1-10) and are in a range of areas.

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  • Number 1: the special thing you do every day to become number one.
  • Number 2: education – read two books per month.
  • Number 3: dieting – the maximum number big meals taken at a restaurant per week.
  • Number 4: fitness – the number of exercise days per week.
  • Number 5: sales – the number of appointments per week for new prospects.
  • Number 6: television – the maximum number of viewing hours per week.
  • Number 7: goal review – the number of days each week for a review.
  • Number 8: sleep – eight hours per night is best for most people.
  • Number 9: goals – the maximum number of items on the goal list.
  • Number 10: networking – meet ten new people per week (or month).

The main idea here is not to create a list like this one, but to simply pick one or more simple things to attach a simple number to. If exercise is a key, pick the number of sessions per week and put a system in place for getting it done. The simpler the number, the easier it is to remember and visualize it being accomplished. Seinfeld had his big full year wall calendar and reminded himself to never break the chain of marked out days.

Why does this work? Because there is no ambiguity nor is there a place to make excuses when there is sufficient importance put on the simple number. When we establish complex systems for our goals, it becomes easier to defeat them through clever means. They are also harder to remember and visualize. They are also harder to explain to others. With something simple like deciding whether or not to watch a television movie, it becomes easier to switch the thing off if the 6, 10, 2 or whatever hour per week quota has already been met.

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Be careful about building tolerances into the numbers. There is a place for a zero tolerance or zero deviation goals, but they should be used sparingly and only for the main goal. Build in a little flexibility for other goals that are less important. Beating yourself up for not meeting arbitrary goals can be unhealthy. Another aspect is that the goal number needs to be achievable, even under unusual circumstances. Reading two books per month becomes more difficult if you are traveling on a six week vacation and forgot to bring reading glasses along. No need to force-read four the following month or stress yourself out during the vacation because that would be counterproductive.

An important aspect of picking a simple number is that this works better for the long term than for the short term. This technique is great when you are trying to form habits and create lifestyle changes. If you have a financial problem and are working your way out of debt, a simple goal like a “a minimum $20 per day increase in net worth” won’t do much in the short term. After a few years of this, the outcome can be quite dramatic. Similarly, a weight loss goal for an obese person of say “1 pound per month or sustainable weight loss” won’t do much in the first year but it will form the habit for longer term results.

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Don’t forget to build in a termination clause. Keep the weight loss goal going too long and there might be a problem at the other end of the scale. Build in a “mission accomplished” goal number and reward yourself for achieving your desired outcome. Seinfeld probably doesn’t write every day anymore now that his show was a big hit and ran its course. There would have been some great parties and he likely has new goals.

There are a couple points on process that matter. Like with other types of goal setting, there needs to be a visual, tangible way of setting these things down. Use a calendar, notebook, wall chart or some other type of written list to make the number stick to reality. This helps with visualization, demonstrating it to others, maintaining accountability and providing a record. Keep a log of your exercise activities if fitness is your goal. Make it as real as possible. If motivation is a problem, get a partner to help. Having a goal of killing the television viewing won’t work very well if your spouse loves movies but will work great if you are both working on reading more or spending more time in bed.

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So, simplify your life by focusing on key numbers. It worked for Seinfeld.

What’s your number?

Peter Paul Roosen and Tatsuya Nakagawa are co-founders of Atomica Creative Group , a specialized strategic product marketing firm. Through leading edge insight and research, sound strategic planning and effective project management, Atomica helps companies achieve greater success in bringing new products to market and in improving their existing businesses. They have co-authored Overcoming Inventoritis now available.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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