Advertising
Advertising

My Redundant Productivity System

My Redundant Productivity System
harddrive.jpg

    Backing up your data is an essential part of digital life and protects you from losing important information. But when something goes wrong with one of your systems, it can mean you have to sift through thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of files for each project you’re involved with.

    Over the last few months, I set up a redundant productivity system. While I ensure that my data is backed up in all the traditional ways, what’s even more important to me is having redundant operational systems that mean I can keep working as if nothing happened while repairs are underway.

    For instance, if my computer fails and I’ve merely cloned my data, I have to search through Library folders for Firefox bookmarks and Address Book contacts. While you can clone a bootable drive in case a hard drive fails, sometimes system failures that don’t involve your hard drive mean that the problem is more extensive and loading up the clone is impossible. Your motherboard dying is an example of such a situation.

    My laptop has been in a repair shop for four weeks and they’re only just now “diagnosing the problem” – yet I haven’t had any issues with workflow disruption. Although as of this week I’m going to be out of the home office more often and will need something more powerful than a PDA but just as portable, a four week window without any serious kinks is pretty good running in my books.

    Advertising

    It’s fairly simple to set up such a system, but it is dependent on having various bits of hardware. That said, all of my hardware is getting out of date and it still works—there’s no need to have the latest and greatest.

    Hardware Set-up

    I classify the hardware in this system in two categories: control systems, and storage solutions. This is because a back-up system only requires you to have storage solutions, but to be redundant when systems fail, you need various ways of accessing and manipulating that data.

    Control Systems

    I have a desktop (Mac mini), laptop (iBook) and a PDA phone (O2 XDA II Mini which rarely has reception). Some people can make it work with more or less, but that’s enough hardware for me to function with redundancy. Your needs will generally differ based on your line of work—a film editor will need something fancier—and your need for portability.

    I use the desktop system as the hub. This isn’t to say it’s where I do most of my work, and in fact when my laptop’s in working order I spend most of my time on that. But given its greater expandability, generally greater storage capacity and the fact you can tether a bunch of non-portable peripherals to it, like large external drives, I ensure that my data is always centralized and most up-to-date on the desktop. My PDA synchronizes with it, and so does my laptop.

    Advertising

    Another good reason to use a desktop as your central hub is that the more you carry something around with you, the higher the chances are that you’ll cause damage to it. The desktop stays in one place. They are also usually peripheral driven, so when a keyboard, mouse or monitor is the problem, it’s easier to just plug another one in. My laptop’s problem is death of the keyboard and power system thanks to coffee spillage, which would’ve been easier to get around had it been my desktop keyboard that drank from the cup.

    The XDA has gotten a bit dodgy, like the last two O2 products I owned before it, so I keep an old iPaq loaded with current information and ready to go in an emergency. Overkill? Certainly. Redundancy is the point, after all.

    Storage Solutions

    While I back-up regularly, it’s far from a perfect back-up, mostly because I don’t have the cash to extend my internal and external hard drives to full capacity. For instance, OS X system folders don’t always get backed up, though system folders in the user hierarchy always are. I do my best to keep anything essential in as many places as possible. I’m a musician and this gets really hard with master recordings, which can chew up space like crazy.

    In terms of hardware, my local storage consists of two external hard drives – I have a 320GB tethered to my desktop pretty much all the time and a small 20GB that I carry around with me. Going back to the music thing (as I’m sure other professionals who deal with large project files sympathize), sometimes the 20GB struggles with Pro Tools or Logic Pro sessions, but when the price of 2.5” drives comes down it might be worth upgrading. I’m not really keen to carry the 3.5” 320GB drive with the power supply all the time!

    Advertising

    Other Storage

    My own hardware is only part of the storage system. I use Gmail (and Google Docs, to a lesser extent) as a backup for critical files, and my shared hosting solution for $6.99 a month takes care of a broader range of things, both critical and non-critical. Anything that can be uploaded to the cloud in decent amounts of time is backed up this way.

    Cloud storage systems have me covered for most things under 100 megabytes.

    Software

    I’m a Mac user, so there are a few good options to keep the information necessary for redundancy backed up.

    Two of those programs come from Mark/Space, who make excellent PDA synchronization software called the Missing Sync, and SyncTogether which synchronizes information between Macs. Contacts, calendars, bookmarks, mail settings, notes and the like can be synchronized between machines using this software, and other information such as documents can be accessed through external drives, Gmail, shared hosting accounts and the like.

    Advertising

    A good practice is to Gmail or FTP documents when you’re closing them, whether they are incomplete or complete. You can create FTP droplets using software like Panic Transmit to make drag-and-drop FTP backup completely painless.

    Folder Systems

    An unusual bit of advice is to employ standardized folder structures across your computers and external drives. In the vein of minimal disruption, you can continue working with drives you don’t usually use without having to adapt to wildly varying folder structures.

    This will vary based on the kind of work you do, but a balance between intuitive (both so you don’t have to think about navigation too much, and so you can set it up on new drives and machines easily), and well-organized is important. If you favor one or the other too much then moving between systems is hard.

    The advice in this article is fairly simple, but I’m surprised by the number of obsessive back-up geeks that don’t practice anything similar. With this system, even my PDA phone can fill in for a day’s work—while it might not be the most efficient way of working, systems fail all the time and having an awkward little keyboard and a stylus is much better than nothing at all.

    If you have a redundant system of your own, or improvements and suggestions for mine, let us know in the comments.

    More by this author

    Joel Falconer

    Editor, content marketer, product manager and writer with 12+ years of experience in the startup, design and tech digital media industries.

    How to Master the Art of Prioritization The Importance of Scheduling Downtime How to Make Decisions Under Pressure 11 Free Mind Mapping Applications & Web Services How to Use Parkinson’s Law to Your Advantage

    Trending in Featured

    1 3 Techniques for Setting Priorities Effectively 2 How to Master the Art of Prioritization 3 How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Big Goals in Life 4 How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators 5 11 Reasons Why You Aren’t Getting Results

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on July 8, 2020

    3 Techniques for Setting Priorities Effectively

    3 Techniques for Setting Priorities Effectively

    It is easy, in the onrush of life, to become a reactor – to respond to everything that comes up, the moment it comes up, and give it your undivided attention until the next thing comes up.

    This is, of course, a recipe for madness. The feeling of loss of control over what you do and when is enough to drive you over the edge, and if that doesn’t get you, the wreckage of unfinished projects you leave in your wake will surely catch up with you.

    Having an inbox and processing it in a systematic way can help you gain back some of that control. But once you’ve processed out your inbox and listed all the tasks you need to get cracking on, you still have to figure out what to do the very next instant. On which of those tasks will your time best be spent, and which ones can wait?

    When we don’t set priorities, we tend to follow the path of least resistance. (And following the path of least resistance, as the late, great Utah Phillips reminded us, is what makes the river crooked!) That is, we’ll pick and sort through the things we need to do and work on the easiest ones – leaving the more difficult and less fun tasks for a “later” that, in many cases, never comes – or, worse, comes just before the action needs to be finished, throwing us into a whirlwind of activity, stress, and regret.

    This is why setting priorities is so important.

    Advertising

    3 Effective Approaches to Set Priorities

    There are three basic approaches to setting priorities, each of which probably suits different kinds of personalities. The first is for procrastinators, people who put off unpleasant tasks. The second is for people who thrive on accomplishment, who need a stream of small victories to get through the day. And the third is for the more analytic types, who need to know that they’re working on the objectively most important thing possible at this moment. In order, then, they are:

    1. Eat a Frog

    There’s an old saying to the effect that if you wake up in the morning and eat a live frog, you can go through the day knowing that the worst thing that can possibly happen to you that day has already passed. In other words, the day can only get better!

    Popularized in Brian Tracy’s book Eat That Frog!, the idea here is that you tackle the biggest, hardest, and least appealing task first thing every day, so you can move through the rest of the day knowing that the worst has already passed.

    When you’ve got a fat old frog on your plate, you’ve really got to knuckle down. Another old saying says that when you’ve got to eat a frog, don’t spend too much time looking at it! It pays to keep this in mind if you’re the kind of person that procrastinates by “planning your attack” and “psyching yourself up” for half the day. Just open wide and chomp that frog, buddy! Otherwise, you’ll almost surely talk yourself out of doing anything at all.

    2. Move Big Rocks

    Maybe you’re not a procrastinator so much as a fiddler, someone who fills her or his time fussing over little tasks. You’re busy busy busy all the time, but somehow, nothing important ever seems to get done.

    Advertising

    You need the wisdom of the pickle jar. Take a pickle jar and fill it up with sand. Now try to put a handful of rocks in there. You can’t, right? There’s no room.

    If it’s important to put the rocks in the jar, you’ve got to put the rocks in first. Fill the jar with rocks, now try pouring in some pebbles. See how they roll in and fill up the available space? Now throw in a couple handfuls of gravel. Again, it slides right into the cracks. Finally, pour in some sand.

    For the metaphorically impaired, the pickle jar is all the time you have in a day. You can fill it up with meaningless little busy-work tasks, leaving no room for the big stuff, or you can do the big stuff first, then the smaller stuff, and finally fill in the spare moments with the useless stuff.

    To put it into practice, sit down tonight before you go to bed and write down the three most important tasks you have to get done tomorrow. Don’t try to fit everything you need, or think you need, to do, just the three most important ones.

    In the morning, take out your list and attack the first “Big Rock”. Work on it until it’s done or you can’t make any further progress. Then move on to the second, and then the third. Once you’ve finished them all, you can start in with the little stuff, knowing you’ve made good progress on all the big stuff. And if you don’t get to the little stuff? You’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you accomplished three big things. At the end of the day, nobody’s ever wished they’d spent more time arranging their pencil drawer instead of writing their novel, or printing mailing labels instead of landing a big client.

    Advertising

    3. Covey Quadrants

    If you just can’t relax unless you absolutely know you’re working on the most important thing you could be working on at every instant, Stephen Covey’s quadrant system as written in The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change might be for you.

    Covey suggests you divide a piece of paper into four sections, drawing a line across and a line from top to bottom. Into each of those quadrants, you put your tasks according to whether they are:

    1. Important and Urgent
    2. Important and Not Urgent
    3. Not Important but Urgent
    4. Not Important and Not Urgent

      The quadrant III and IV stuff is where we get bogged down in the trivial: phone calls, interruptions, meetings (QIII) and busy work, shooting the breeze, and other time wasters (QIV). Although some of this stuff might have some social value, if it interferes with your ability to do the things that are important to you, they need to go.

      Quadrant I and II are the tasks that are important to us. QI are crises, impending deadlines, and other work that needs to be done right now or terrible things will happen. If you’re really on top of your time management, you can minimize Q1 tasks, but you can never eliminate them – a car accident, someone getting ill, a natural disaster, these things all demand immediate action and are rarely planned for.

      Advertising

      You’d like to spend as much time as possible in Quadrant II, plugging away at tasks that are important with plenty of time to really get into them and do the best possible job. This is the stuff that the QIII and QIV stuff takes time away from, so after you’ve plotted out your tasks on the Covey quadrant grid, according to your own sense of what’s important and what isn’t, work as much as possible on items in Quadrant II (and Quadrant I tasks when they arise).

      Getting to Know You

      Spend some time trying each of these approaches on for size. It’s hard to say what might work best for any given person – what fits one like a glove will be too binding and restrictive for another, and too loose and unstructured for a third. You’ll find you also need to spend some time figuring out what makes something important to you – what goals are your actions intended to move you towards.

      In the end, setting priorities is an exercise in self-knowledge. You need to know what tasks you’ll treat as a pleasure and which ones like torture, what tasks lead to your objectives and which ones lead you astray or, at best, have you spinning your wheels and going nowhere.

      These three are the best-known and most time-tested strategies out there, but maybe you’ve got a different idea you’d like to share? Tell us how you set your priorities in the comments.

      More Tips for Effective Prioritization

      Featured photo credit: Mille Sanders via unsplash.com

      Read Next