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Low-Hanging Financial Fruit And What Comes Next

Low-Hanging Financial Fruit And What Comes Next

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    When it comes to making major changes in your financial situation, you’ll probably get some pretty standard advice for saving money: stop buying coffee every day, brown bag your lunch and start clipping coupons. That’s because these sorts of changes are low-hanging fruit. For most people, making these sorts of changes in their spending is not too difficult — and because they’re everyday habits, it’s possible to save quite a bit of money over the course of a year.

    Finding Low-Hanging Fruit

    Most financial gurus have a few favorite recommendations when it comes to the low-hanging fruit of your finances. Coffee, in particular, gets singled out for attention, over and over again. The fairly common habit of picking up coffee each morning has even been vilified as the ‘Latte Factor.’

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    But what happens after you’ve cut out coffee — or if you don’t drink coffee in the first place? The standard suggestions may not be so useful for you. Instead, it’s worth taking a look around for some low-hanging fruit of your own. There’s no automatic identifier for such an expense, but a simple way to look for savings opportunities is to look at your daily habits. That’s because anything you do day after day can yield more savings because even a small expense can add up quickly over 365 days.

    That’s the real definition of low-hanging fruit: with relatively small amounts of effort, you can get big results. Of course, just how much effort is required for a particular project can differ with something as simple as whether or not you have a coffee pot at home. When you see a financial tip that seems like it would be fairly simple, it’s worthwhile to take a look at the effort and money involved. If the effort isn’t worth the money, it’s okay to keep walking — what is low-hanging fruit for one person is the hardest apple to reach in the tree for another.

    But not all simple changes are the same. Just as there are some relatively simple steps you can take to modify your spending, there are often a few basic options for bringing in more income — such as selling off a few collectibles on eBay. You may even find low-hanging fruit when it comes to saving and investing your money: any time you can automate your savings, you can generally see a better return than if you try to handle the process manually.

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    When You Run Out Of Low-Hanging Fruit

    It can take a little while to change even small habits and work your way through all the suggestions you find from various financial advisers — but sooner or later, you’ll run out of the low-hanging fruit available in your personal situation. That point can be an ideal opportunity to stop and reassess your finances.

    For some people, the easy fixes are enough to move them to where they want to be, financially speaking. Just by cutting down on habitual spending or automating savings, some people will be able to accomplish their financial goals. For other people, though, it can take a little more to move into a financial situation where they feel comfortable. If you find yourself in that second group, it may be time to start looking at some harder steps.

    A starting point is any financial tips you passed by when focusing on simple steps. If you initially considered something not worth the effort it would require — a programmable thermostat might have tripped up one person, while calling a service provider and negotiating a lower rate would be problematic for another one.

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    Another option is aiming for some more significant changes in your lifestyle. A raise would probably make a big difference in your finances, but it may take further education or extra hours at work — it’s the opposite of low-hanging fruit. But it is probably worth working towards if you need to make a bigger difference in your finances in order to meet your goals.

    Small Changes First, Then Big Changes

    Making the easy changes first may seem like a system that won’t pay off as well as chasing a few bigger changes — even if those bigger changes are harder to arrange. But the fact of the matter is that when you’re doing something like changing your morning coffee routine, you’re likely changing an ingrained habit. It’s not going to be the easiest thing to do, but after you’ve changed one or two habits, the rest get a little easier to handle.

    That practice at changing habits can pay off when you start focusing on bigger fish. Something like going back to school to improve your paycheck is going to require a whole new set of habits, in a stressful environment. Having a little practice with the process of changing habits can come in handy in such a situation. The process, as a whole, may take longer, but it will be more likely to pay off.

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    It doesn’t hurt, either that even a couple of the simpler changes you can make to your personal finance can translate into a good amount of cash. If you can stack several smaller steps with a couple of bigger changes, you can wind up with a significant difference in your financial situation. Do the numbers yourself: look at what you can save by changing one small thing in your daily routine and then build from there.

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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