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Life Lessons of the Dread Pirate Roberts

Life Lessons of the Dread Pirate Roberts

Jolly Roger

    Once word leaks out that a pirate has gone soft, people begin to disobey you, and then it’s nothing but work, work, work, all the time. 

    Ah, who can resist the call of the pirate’s life. Yo ho, ho yo, right? I was surprised to find recently that, while The Princess Bride’’s Dread Pirate Roberts is clearly a fictional character, there really was a dreaded pirate Roberts who sailed the high seas in the early 18th century, looting and pillaging at his ease. Unlike Westley’s predecessor, this Roberts was named not Cummerbund but Bartholomew, an equally less-than-fear-inducing name (though somewhat more suitable when shortened to Bart).

    Piracy, as it turns out, wasn’t quite what our movies today make it out to be. In many ways, it was worse – Dread Pirate Roberts only killed the crews of the ships he plundered, while plenty of real pirates were notorious for their creative tortures, like slicing off a victim’s ears, frying them up, and forcing the victim to eat them. But in other ways, pirates’ lives were quite a bit better than our movies make out – they were free in ways few of their times were, and had developed laws and traditions that protected their freedoms as well as – if not better than – our modern Constitutional principles.

    In fact, there are quite a few things we can learn from the pirates of the 17th and 18th centuries. Like other organized criminals, pirates were consummate business people, whose taste for booty could only satisfied by shrewd thinking and practical action. Here, then, are six things the Dread Pirate Roberts might tell you if you hired him as a business consultant for your firm, or a life coach.

    1. Your reputation precedes you.

    I know who you are — your cruelty reveals everything. You’re the Dread Pirate Roberts; admit it.

    What a coup for the Dread Pirate Roberts! Here he is, face-to-face with a farm girl-turned-princess, and he’s recognized instantly – despite the fact that nobody’s ever seen him and lived. That’s reputation, and in many ways, it’s the most important treasure.

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    Pirates had a rough dilemma to face. They made their living by boarding and plundering merchant ships. Fighting too hard against those ships’ crews risked damaging the ship or its precious cargo – but not fighting hard enough meant most likely suffering defeat and not winning the prize at all.

    Pirates’ solution to this dilemma was clever – they let it be known that the crews of any ship that surrendered without a fight would be spared, unharmed – while every last man of a crew that resisted would be slaughtered, often viciously. With that kind of reputation, pirates rarely had to fight at all – most crews that came under assault by pirates surrendered immediately.

    Today, your reputation spreads more easily and more quickly than ever before – imagine what pirates could have accomplished with a service like RateMyPirate.com! A reputation for being effective and without qualms about doing what’s necessary can open a lot of doors.

    2. Follow through on your promises.

    THE DREAD PIRATE ROBERTS TAKES NO SURVIVORS. ALL YOUR WORST NIGHTMARES ARE ABOUT TO COME TRUE!

    A reputation for blood-thirstiness did pirates no good if they weren’t willing to actually be blood-thirsty when the occasion demanded. Every now and again, for whatever reason, a merchant captain and his crew would decide to press their luck in defense of their ship. In those cases, pirates usually won handily – they often outnumbered the crews of the ships they boarded as much as ten-to-one, their ships were faster and better armed, and in the end, they had little to lose.

    Once a crew decided the engage with pirates, there was no quarter – and no survivors. But  the flip side of the promise had to be honored just as well – a crew that surrendered without a struggle had to be treated with the utmost courtesy, or merchant sailors would quickly learn there was no upside to surrendering. Pirates thus not only showed their captives the deepest respect, they often rewarded them with treasure from their own holds, and even recruited sailors to join their crews.

    Follow-through is crucial, for today’s business person as well as for the pirates of old. If you make a promise, be prepared to keep it, even when it’s impractical – or be prepared to pay the consequence as your reputation crumbles and more and more people feel comfortable challenging your word.

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    3. Distinguish yourself proudly.

    Pirate Ship

      While pirates flew under all manner of flags, once the pursuit was under way they quickly ran up the Jolly Roger – the pirate’s black flag adorned with images of death and terror, including the famous skull and crossbones but also skeletons, bleeding hearts, and decapitated heads.

      The purpose of the Jolly Roger is simple: it let the crew of the ship under attack know that their boarders-to-be were pirates, and resistance would be severely dealt with. The Jolly Roger tied the pirate reputation for cruelty to the vessel about to overtake your own. It made plundering easy.

      But if flying the pirate’s flag made it easy to capture a ship without resistance, why didn’t military ships, coast guards, and privateers fly the same flag? The answer is that flying the Jolly Roger came with a price that few non-pirates could afford – you had to be willing to kill mercilessly to make good the promise of the Jolly Roger, should the enemy resist, and you had to be willing to face hanging if you were captured sailing under the Jolly Roger.

      Pirates showed few compunctions about torturing and killing a crew that gave them trouble, a level of blood-thirstiness few more legitimate raiders could stomach – especially as they often had to answer to authorities back home. And for a pirate, the penalty was the same whether they flew the Jolly Roger or not: death by hanging. For others boarding and plundering ships under government authorization, flying a pirate flag meant death if captured, while plundering under their own nation’s flag was legal (or nearly so).

      The high cost of hoisting the Jolly Roger made it uniquely pirates’ own, and was recouped many times over in booty taken with ease. Do you have a marker of excellence that others can’t afford? Producing a better product than anyone else, certification from third-parties, high-value clients and endorsements – these things are expensive to acquire and expensive to maintain, so display them proudly as marks of your excellence – and avoid or minimize those marks that anyone can achieve.

      4. Be accountable.

      Pirates lived under a code of democratic leadership that was virtually unheard of in the early 18th century. Captains were elected by popular acclaim, and quartermasters were appointed to act as a check on the captain’s power. To hold  onto his position – and often enough his life – a captain had to be fair and even-handed with his crew, and vicious and extravagant with others when the situation called for it. A slip-up could lead immediately to a vote of no confidence and appointment of a new leader, with the old captain marooned on a deserted island with naught by a pistol, some shot and powder, and a jug of water to keep him company.

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      To maintain transparency, captains often slept alongside their crews, ate the same food, and maintained an open-door policy in their cabins. Except in the heat of battle, the captain could expect to be questioned on every decision, so had better have had a good reason for all of them. Booty was often kept in unlocked chests in an open, public space aboard ship, to prevent an unscrupulous captains from self-dealing.

      This openness was crucial to pirates’ success. A captain’s crew, after all, served at their own will under great threat to their personal safety whether in battle or if captured. A captain’s accountability kept the crew satisfied and loyal, allowing the captain to pursue his goals and everyone to benefit. While today’s business leader might have a little more leeway in his or her behavior – he or she can’t be removed from their post quite so easily as the pirate captains of yesteryear, for one thing – embracing the pirates’ code of transparency cna go a long way towards running a tight ship, free of morale problems and unrpoductive strife.

      5. Manage your personal brand.

      Then he explained the name was the important thing for inspiring the necessary fear. You see, no one would surrender to the Dread Pirate Westley.

      One of the most fearsome names in pirate history was Edward Teach’s working name: Blackbeard. Blackbeard carefully cultivated his personal brand, braiding his long beard and hair to give himself a terrifying appearance, even to the point of working lit matches or fuses into his beard so that his head was wreathed in pungent smoke. No pirate’s name was ever so feared.

      In fact, so well did Blackbeard manage his brand that over the course of his career, he had not once been obligated to take a single life. Talk about faking it until you make it!

      The secret of Blackbeard’s success is his effective use of image and close attention to PR. His fearsome appearance, boasting, and determination put weight behind the pirate promise to give no quarter – so effectively, that he was never called on to prove it. That’s good branding!

      6. Don’t be afraid to make enemies.

      Finally, the most successful pirates always made it clear who their enemies were. Captains pit themselves against all merchants under a particular country’s or colony’s flag, often in response to the hanging of their colleagues, killing all crewmembers of a particular nation to demonstrate the cost of dealing harsh justice against pirates. Heavy-handed merchant captains were also targeted, with pirates often surveying the crew to determine how well they were treated and then torturing or killing their captain to punish wrongdoing.

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      These personal vendettas and rogue administrations of justice helped pirates by solidifying support for them among  at least a significant minority of non-pirate seamen. While the members of Spanish colonies might be terrified by a pirate who announced his intention to kill all aboard ships sailing from a particular Spanish port, English sailors might well be rooting him on! Likewise, sailors of all nations experienced the frustration, humiliation, and often degradation of working under an unfair and brutal captain – and may well have learned to view attack by pirates as a kind of liberation.

      This is as true of business – and other realms – today as it was of piracy then. Taking a strong stand against something or someone may well solidify your opposition, but it also solidifies your own core of support. Consider Apple. By taking on Microsoft so boldly in their “Mac and PC” ads over the last few years, they’ve certainly upset plenty of Microsoft employees and users, but they’ve also strengthened the tight-knit community of Apple users drawn as much by Apple’s “spunk” as by the design of their products.

      A pirate’s life for you!

      Have you ever considered piracy? You’d make a wonderful Dread Pirate Roberts.

      You would make a wonderful Dread Pirate Roberts. Just keep in mind these lessons from the world of piracy and see where they take you. For now, let’s say the black mask is optional.

      Avast!

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      Last Updated on November 28, 2018

      Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

      Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

      Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

      Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

      A couple of months ago, I met up with an old friend of mine who I hadn’t seen since last year. Over lunch, we talked about all kinds of things, including our careers, relationships and hobbies.

      My friend told me his job had become dull and uninteresting to him, and despite applying for promotion – he’d been turned down. His personal life wasn’t great either, as he told me that he’d recently separated from his long-term girlfriend.

      When I asked him why things had seemingly gone wrong at home and work, he paused for a moment, and then replied:

      “I’m having a run of bad luck.”

      I was surprised by his response as I’d never thought of him as someone who thought that luck controlled his life. He always appeared to be someone who knew what he wanted – and went after it with gusto.

      He told me he did believe in bad luck because of everything happened to me.

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      It was at this point, that I shared my opinion on luck and destiny:

      While chance events certainly occur, they are purely random in nature. In other words, good luck and bad luck don’t exist in the way that people believe. And more importantly, even if random negative events do come along, our perspective and reaction can turn them into positive things.

      Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

      1. Stop believing that what happens in life is out of your control.

      Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

      Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

      Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

      Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

      This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

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      They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

      Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

      Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

      What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

      No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

      When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

      Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

      2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

      If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

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      In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

      Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.

      It definitely wasn’t an easy time for her. She was stressful and tired. But it wasn’t bad luck that was playing the role.

      Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

      They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

      Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

      I explained to Kelly that to improve her fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to her; then try to focus on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

      Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.

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      A few months later, she told me that she finally found two investors who were really interested in her project and would like to work with her to grow the business. I was really glad that she could take back control of her destiny and achieved what she wanted.

      Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

      What’s Next?

      Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!

      If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over with these 7 Cornerstone Skills. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

      How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

      Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

      “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

      Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

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      Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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