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Introducing Lifehack Apps: Powered by Appstores

Introducing Lifehack Apps: Powered by Appstores


    Lifehack has been expanding its number of posts per week over the past few months, and we’re looking to add more and more to the site to enhance the overall reader experience. Today marks another of these enhancements — the first being Lifehack Deals — as we are pleased to announce the launch of Lifehack Apps, a destination where you can discover apps that fall into what we talk about here at Lifehack.

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    What is Lifehack Apps?

    Powered by Appstores, Lifehack Apps features apps from all of the major platforms sorted into categories that are based on our blog post categories (Productivity, Money, Management, Technology, Lifestyle and Communication). Lifehack Apps can be viewed in a variety of ways, as you can look at apps based on rating, price, popularity and more. Each app entry will feature a description, and as the store continues to populate, we will be adding editorial reviews as well. Lifehack Apps allows us to conduct more reviews for apps within a portal dedicated to just that — allowing us to focus on using the Lifehack blog for articles that aren’t so much review-based. Whenever we touch on an app, it will bring you — the reader — to Lifehack Apps so that you can read a more comprehensive entry on the app itself. You’ll get a better sense of what the app is about, our thoughts on it (as well as the thoughts of other readers), and be able to decide whether it is right for you.

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    Lifehack Apps will also be curated by our editors so that we can offer the best experience possible. That means you’ll get the lowdown on all kinds of apps that fit in with what we do here at Lifehack, and you’ll be able to add you own two cents with the commenting system that Appstores serves up at the portal. That makes our Lifehack Apps portal not only a great place to discover apps, but a place where you can discuss those discoveries as well.

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    We’re just getting started with Lifehack Apps as there is a lot more to it than meets the eye. We’re sorting through the various apps already mentioned and fine-tuning the experience in the process. We’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below. And remember — this is just another of the ways we’re looking to enhance the Lifehack experience for you, our readers. Let us know how we’re doing…and thanks for reading!

    (Photo credit: Apps via Shutterstock)

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    Last Updated on October 16, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

    How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

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    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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