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How to use natural selection to drive your career

How to use natural selection to drive your career

Charles Darwin was one of the greatest scientific geniuses of all time. His Theory of Evolution is accepted just about universally in the scientific community. It explains that all life is driven by a process that he called Natural Selection.

Life is a constant competition for survival. When creatures reproduce, tiny changes and imperfections are introduced into the next generation. Most fail. But a few, a very few, successful changes and adaptations give their owners an advantage over the competition. These offspring maybe avoid predators more easily, live longer, have more offspring themselves, fight off disease, or get more food. Over the next few generations, those with the advantage will overtake those who don’t have it, until it becomes standard in the population. Repeat this process for millions of years and you produce all life on the Earth as we know it.

You can deliberately use the same process to build up your own natural advantages and do better in the equally competitive environment of working life.

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First, identify something that works well for you, gives you some kind of edge. Maybe it’s a skill, a natural gift, an easy way of doing things others find hard, or even a way of thinking. Whatever it is, take a little while to check it out. Is it truly an advantage? Does it give really you an edge? Can you do it again and again?

Now that you’ve found it, cultivate it deliberately. Use it whenever you can. Refine it. Add to it. Focus on it. Forget those things you don’t do so well. You’re building competitive advantage, not trying to catch up with what others find easier than you do.

When you’ve found and developed one successful adaptation, go find another and repeat the process. Amass as many natural advantages as you can. See what works and go with it, regardless of whether it’s what you expected—or what other people tell you is “good” or “approved.”

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Your aim is simple. By using as many natural advantages as you can find or create for yourself, and using them systematically, you’re giving yourself an edge in that process of Natural Selection. Your aim is to be the one who survives and prospers.

Always give time to doing what you do best. Concentrate on it with a fierce devotion. Try continually to be even better in your chosen field. Keep building on your strengths. Keep adding to your advantages.

And the things that you don’t do so well? Ignore them whenever you can. If you have to deal with them, do the minimum you need to get by. Don’t waste effort going from abysmal to mediocre when you could apply the same effort elsewhere to move from very good to outstanding to spectacular.

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No species ever thrived by working on its weaknesses and forgetting about its natural strengths. European House Sparrows are small, weak, drab birds with no talons or beautiful feathers. They’ve spread just about everywhere in the world by exploiting a single strength—they know how to thrive in towns. The more urban sprawl, the more House Sparrows. Eagles are huge, powerful birds, but you don’t find them living in the center of New York or London. Their habitat is being destroyed by the growth of the very cities that House Sparrows love.

Don’t try to go against the way the world works. Go with it and prosper. Maybe you’ll be like the House Sparrow—one great advantage, ruthlessly exploited, will make you the ultimate success story.

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Adrian Savage is a writer, an Englishman, and a retired business executive, in that order. He lives in Tucson, Arizona. You can read his other articles at Slow Leadership, the site for everyone who wants to build a civilized place to work and bring back the taste, zest and satisfaction to leadership and life. His latest book, Slow Leadership: Civilizing The Organization

    , is now available at all good bookstores.

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    Last Updated on October 14, 2020

    The Art of Humble Confidence

    The Art of Humble Confidence

    To be confident or not to be confident, that is the question. I’m not sure about you, but I’ve been a bit confused about all this discussion about the subject of confidence. Do you really need to be more confident or should you try to be more humble? I think the answer is both – you just have to know where to use it.

    East VS West – Confidence, It’s a Cultural Thing

    In typical Western countries, the answer to the confidence debate is obvious – more is better. Our heros are rebellious, independent and shoot first, ask questions later. I think this snippet of dialog from The Matrix sums it up best:

    Agent Smith – “We’re willing to wipe the slate clean, give you a fresh start. All that we’re asking in return is your cooperation in bringing a known terrorist to justice.”
    Neo – “Yeah. Well, that sounds like a pretty good deal. But I think I may have a better one. How about, I give you the finger”
    [He does]
    Neo -“ …and you give me my phone call.”

    In Eastern countries, the tone is often considerably different. Elders are supposed to be revered not dismissed. The words ‘guru,’ meaning a teacher, and the philosophy of dharma, loosely translated to mean ‘duty,’ come from here. In Eastern cultures humility and respect are more important than confidence.

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    These perspectives are generalizations, but it shows how the confidence debate goes back deep into our culture. I think that both extremes of pure confidence or pure humility are misguided. Instead of rectifying this situation by simply blending the two: becoming somewhat humble, somewhat confident all the time, I believe the answer is to know when to be confident and when to be humble.

    Humble Confidence – Know When to Use It

    I’m going to make another broad generalization. I believe that virtually every relationship you are going to have is going to fit into one of two major archetypes, either master or student. In peer relationships this master/student role may switch frequently, but it is extremely rare that the relationship never leans to one side.

    In the master role, you are displaying confidence to get what you want. This is public speaker, leader or seducer. Being the master has advantages. You have more control and ability to influence from this role.

    The student role is the opposite. You are intentionally displaying humility. This is the student, disciple or follower. Being the student has advantages too. You can learn a lot more in this role and are more likely to win the trust of the other person.

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    Know When to Shut Up and Learn

    If you are a typical Westerner, you are probably already thinking about which role you prefer. Being the leader is great. You get respect and a higher status. Most of all you get a greater degree of control.

    But the problem is that you can’t and shouldn’t always try to be the leader. Trying to assume that role without the skills, resources or status to back it up will lead to conflict. More importantly, there are many times when you purposely want to display humility. Some of the benefits to the student role include:

    • You learn more.
    • Smooths relationships.
    • Makes others more willing to lend a helping hand.

    Knowing when taking the humble route is to your advantage. It is far easier to get mentors and advisors if you use humility rather than arrogance. A small sacrifice to your ego can open up the potential to learn a lot.

    Confidence to Persuade, Humility to Learn

    In reality almost no relationship is as clearly defined as master/student. Within our connections, people have overlapping areas of expertise. I might be an expert in blogging to a non-blogger, but they might be an expert in finance. In each area there are different roles to take.

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    Before any interaction ask yourself what the purpose is. Are you trying to learn or persuade?

    Persuasion requires confidence. If you are trying to sell, instruct or lead you need to display the confidence to match your message. But learning requires humility. You won’t learn anything if you are constantly arguing with your professors, mentors or employers. Taking a dose of humility and temporarily making yourself a student gives you the opportunity to absorb.

    Persuade Less, Learn More

    Persuasion is great for immediate effect, but learning matters over the long-haul. Instead of washing over all your communication with pure confidence, look for opportunities to learn. Persuading someone to follow you may give you an immediate boost of satisfaction, but it doesn’t last. Learning, however, is an investment for the future.

    Whenever I make a connection with someone and realize they have a skill or understanding I want, I am careful to express humility in that area. That means listening with what they say even if I don’t immediately agree and being patient with their response. This method often drastically cuts down the time I need to spend on trial and error to learn by myself.

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    Confidence/Humility Doesn’t Replace Communication Skills

    This approach of selectively using confidence and humility for different purposes doesn’t replace communication skills. Humility isn’t going to work if the other person thinks you’re an irritating whiner. Confidence won’t work if the entire room thinks you are an arrogant jerk. Knowing how to display these two qualities takes practice.

    The next time you are about to enter into an interaction ask yourself why you are doing it. Are you trying to persuade or learn? Depending on which you can take a completely different tact for far better results.

    Featured photo credit: BBH Singapore via unsplash.com

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