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How to close off a project properly

How to close off a project properly
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The emphasis on getting things done (GTD) through technologies, tools and psychological tweaks has helped us become able to achieve new heights in productivity. This is great since the more things that we can finish, the sooner we can get on to other (often bigger and better) things. That could mean picking up more money, vacation time or opportunities to try new things – whatever is important at the time. But don’t be in too much of a rush to close a file or finish grinding out the last 10% of a task. There are some great ways to finish things that can yield important benefits for you and those around you who are involved. These benefits can often extend to those who may later come onto the scene.

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Closing a project should include the following elements:

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  • Recognition. McDonalds has its longstanding Employee of the Month picture frame program. Dell has a Volunteers of Distinction program for its employees who become involved with volunteer projects. Toastmasters International has numerous awards for its members completing various tasks and terms of office. The best programs have five aspects:
  • Achievable: The standards are high but not so high as to discourage all but the overachievers from trying to reach them.
  • Objective: People need to know what to expect and to perceive the granting of awards as not being an overly subjective process.
  • Practical: Include rewards that are sensible motivators. Time off and cash don’t make much sense if you are short staffed and cash strapped. However, when the coffers are full and you are in a slow season, time and cash would be better motivators than a coffee table ornament.
  • Timely: The closer the granting of an award to the completion of the task, the better.
  • Useful: Wherever possible, measure and reward something that helps to produce desired results.
  • Documentation. Most companies tend to do a pretty good job of documenting completions since it usually involves financial accounting aspects. Not-for-profit organizations are often notorious for failing to properly document project completions and address transfer issues. Doing a good job of these aspects can make life much easier for those taking over the offices in the future. For example, if an organization has an annual conference, it should prepare an electronic file with all the materials used to plan, promote, operate and complete the event. Maybe burn a CD and give it to the following year’s conference chair.
  • Review and re-examination. This is part of the sandwich – the stuff in the middle. Between the recognition and celebration aspects, this is a great place to conduct an evaluation and bring in constructive feedback so that improvements can be made in future projects. Such feedback should include some positives (things that worked well), suggestions for improvement and a positive overall. A sandwich within the sandwich. These reviews can provide tremendous growth opportunities for those involved, as well as helpful in improving the quality of the projects themselves.
  • Closure & cleanup. Aspects of closure normally include getting paid and paying everybody, completing any outstanding paperwork, filing any required reports, briefing anyone who needs to be briefed, tossing out the trash and cleaning up the factory, warehouse or workspace. Generally, once this is done, the slate should be clear and wherever possible there should not be lingering remains from old projects interfering with future activities.
  • Celebration. The Hollywood people have mastered this with wrap parties and big events such as the Academy Awards. Every time a film is completed, tradition calls for a “wrap party” where everyone involved in the production gets together for a celebration, wrapping up the production. The Academy Awards are an extreme case where the industry in a very public way awards its own for various things while bringing greater recognition to the film and television industry as a whole.

Build an event but keep it in proper proportion. For a small group project at work, ordering in lunch and having a light review and review wrap-up session would work great. The team leader could acknowledge everyone’s contribution, perhaps with a more senior executive coming by to say a few words and present awards. The meal itself could be the award but it is usually better to have something that goes beyond the event. Cash and time off are great but so is something tangible that can be put on display by the person who has earned it. For a bigger project, a big splash at a hotel or conference venue might give the best results. What such an event should look like and how big it should be depends on a number of factors. The important thing is to scale it appropriately. Putting an event together can take considerable time, money and effort, so some thought should be put into planning and managing it properly.

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Overachievers beware. Finishing does not mean starting. There is nothing wrong with using a closing event to announce something new. In fact, this is often a great way to launch a new project. But launching something new should not undermine the thing just completed. Focus the events surrounding the completion on the completion, not on the new beginnings. This serves to preserve the integrity of the activity just completed and to allow those involved to take a breath, enjoy the prizes, tidy up the paperwork, reflect, mop up any odds and ends, and freely enjoy the celebration without getting prematurely wrapped up in the next thing.

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These above completion elements might seem obvious to someone reading them but there is often no formal process in a company or organization for carrying them out effectively. Those that have these processes tend to do a much better job of completing projects with a flourish than those that do not. Larger and more successful companies and organizations tend to be the ones that have such processes.

Those who do a great job finishing projects leave fellow team members motivated towards getting involved and doing great things on future projects. A well completed task also has enough properly completed documentation associated with it that anyone who wants to learn from or duplicate the results in the future is able to do so without having to figure it out from scratch.
If you have any tips or ideas to share on finishing, please post a comment.

Peter Paul Roosen and Tatsuya Nakagawa are co-founders of Atomica Creative Group, a specialized strategic product marketing firm. Through leading edge insight and research, sound strategic planning and effective project management, Atomica helps companies achieve greater success in bringing new products to market and in improving their existing businesses. They have co-authored Overcoming Inventoritis: The Silent Killer of Innovation now available.

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Last Updated on November 28, 2018

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

A couple of months ago, I met up with an old friend of mine who I hadn’t seen since last year. Over lunch, we talked about all kinds of things, including our careers, relationships and hobbies.

My friend told me his job had become dull and uninteresting to him, and despite applying for promotion – he’d been turned down. His personal life wasn’t great either, as he told me that he’d recently separated from his long-term girlfriend.

When I asked him why things had seemingly gone wrong at home and work, he paused for a moment, and then replied:

“I’m having a run of bad luck.”

I was surprised by his response as I’d never thought of him as someone who thought that luck controlled his life. He always appeared to be someone who knew what he wanted – and went after it with gusto.

He told me he did believe in bad luck because of everything happened to me.

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It was at this point, that I shared my opinion on luck and destiny:

While chance events certainly occur, they are purely random in nature. In other words, good luck and bad luck don’t exist in the way that people believe. And more importantly, even if random negative events do come along, our perspective and reaction can turn them into positive things.

Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

1. Stop believing that what happens in life is out of your control.

Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

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They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

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In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.

It definitely wasn’t an easy time for her. She was stressful and tired. But it wasn’t bad luck that was playing the role.

Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

I explained to Kelly that to improve her fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to her; then try to focus on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.

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A few months later, she told me that she finally found two investors who were really interested in her project and would like to work with her to grow the business. I was really glad that she could take back control of her destiny and achieved what she wanted.

Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

What’s Next?

Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!

If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over with these 7 Cornerstone Skills. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

“I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

More Ideas About Creating Your Own Luck

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Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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