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Holiday Windfalls: 7 Tips on Using Them

Holiday Windfalls: 7 Tips on Using Them

windfall

    The holidays often come with a windfall or two: a monetary gift from a relative or a bonus from an employer. We don’t necessarily expect these gifts — that’s why they’re called windfalls — so deciding what to do with them can be a little complicated. Perhaps you have a pressing need for cash to pay an important bill. If so, that kind of practical application may make your decision for you. If you don’t have such a need, however, take time to consider your options.

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    1. Put it in your emergency fund

    While this option doesn’t sound particularly fun, it may be a life saver. Approximately 60 percent of Americans don’t have enough to make it through a full month on just their emergency savings — a huge problem if you’ve been watching the job market lately. If you’re in that group, a windfall might be your best opportunity for actually starting an emergency fund. If you’ve got a little bit of money already put away for a rainy day, using even a portion of your holiday gift to pad it can pay off. I’ve got my emergency fund in the savings account with the highest interest rate I could find: I’ve already put a few windfalls in there, and I’ve got the comfort of knowing that they’re actually earning me a little money.

    2. Set aside a few dollars for something fun

    Saving money all the time can be tough. More than a few people fall off the frugality wagon because it’s depressing to save every single cent you can. What’s the point of saving every little bit if you don’t get to enjoy your savings on occasion? I wouldn’t suggest spending all of your money on entertainment, but there’s nothing wrong with setting aside a few dollars of ‘play money.’ Depending on the windfall, using a fraction of your gift towards fun could be the equivalent of a dinner out or a new television — if you can afford it, neither is unreasonable.

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    3. Make an investment

    The stock market might make most investors cringe right now, but that doesn’t actually mean that investment is a bad choice. There are still many conservative investment options that can provide a safe place to keep your money and earn a little interest. Those conservative investments don’t provide the return of riskier choices, of course, but they can still provide a little income. Depending on your long-term financial goals, stocks may not be a horrible idea either — consider consulting a financial planner if you want to invest a significant amount of your windfall.

    4. Share the wealth

    I don’t tithe a certain percentage of my income, although I know people who do — including when they receive windfalls. I do believe, however, that it’s good to support causes you believe in (especially when your own financial situation is comfortable). Many non-profits are struggling this year as donations have dropped. If you have made a charitable contribution in years past but have cut back this year, think about donating even a few dollars of your windfall.

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    5. Pay down debt

    Odds are pretty good that you’re already working on paying down any consumer debt you might have — the balances on your credit cards and accounts. Applying a windfall to those balances can not only help you eliminate your debt faster, but it can also save you money in the long run. If you can wipe out consumer debt, you don’t have to pay interest on it. If your credit card balances are in great shape, the same holds true for your ‘good’ debt: mortgages and school loans are considered good debt because they help you earn and save money in the long run. Still, they’re both forms of debt and the faster you pay them off, the less interest you pay.

    6. Put it towards a bigger goal

    Saving up for a down payment on a house? Or for Junior’s education? If you’ve got a big goal that you’re saving up for, a windfall may help move you along to your goal faster than you might otherwise manage. Especially if you have a little time to save up for a goal, like Junior’s college, interest can turn even a few dollars into a larger amount — there are special investment options created for just such goals, like 529 plans. If you are looking at a shorter-term goal, you can often use that savings as a sort of emergency fund: you won’t want to pull money away from your goal, but you won’t be in too much trouble if you do.

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    7. Mix and match

    No matter how small a windfall is, you can divide it among these options if you choose. Dividing a monetary gift between your goals can give you an opportunity to move forward on all of them — if you feel like you’ve only made progress in one area this year, you have the opportunity to make a little progress on all the rest before the year ends. In some cases, it may be crucial to get ahead on a particular goal: you’ll want to take your finances into account to make your decision. And if you have any other ideas for using a windfall, please share them in the comments.

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    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

    1. Zoho Notebook
      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
    2. Evernote
      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
    3. Net Notes
      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
    4. i-Lighter
      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
    5. Clipmarks
      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
    6. UberNote
      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
    7. iLeonardo
      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
    8. Zotero
      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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