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Holding It All Together On the Go

Holding It All Together On the Go
Holding It All Together On the Go

    This week marks the beginning of the Fall semester for me, and as usual, I have a crazy schedule. I thought I might share some of the things I do to manage the frenzy that the life of an adjunct can be, in the hopes that it might give you some ideas about how to deal with the craziness of your own schedule.

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    First, some background. I’m an adjunct professor, which means I teach essentially as a temp, renewing my contract each semester depending on the needs of the departments I work for. At the moment, I’m teaching five sections of two courses at two different schools, a university and a community college (the worst was a couple semesters ago when I taught at four different campuses, one almost 40 miles from where I live). I have three offices, one at home and one at each college. Over the course of the week, I use computers in six different locations: at home, at one of my two offices (which I share, by the way, with other adjuncts), and in each of three classrooms. In addition, I write, both here at lifehack.org and elsewhere, and for both mainstream and academic audiences.

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    All this moving around means that I have to work pretty hard to make sure I have what I need with me at any given moment, and that I can work wherever I happen to be — with or without a computer. Here are some of the things I do to manage all that:

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    1. Centralize everything. The most important thing for me is that there be a single place where I know I can find everything I need. Since I don’t have an office of my own at either school, and since some of my work is unrelated to my teaching, it makes sense that this place would be my home office. Essentially I’ve transformed my office computer into a server, allowing me to access whatever I need from wherever I happen to be. For this purpose, I use LogMeIn Free, a free service that allows me to access my computer through their website. A client runs on my PC, and when I log in and maximize the screen it’s almost as if I were sitting in front of my home PC.

      The upshot is, I can create files or work on already-existing files wherever I happen to be and they’re saved on my hard drive at home. In fact, I can even leave a file I’m working on open, and it will be sitting there ready to be worked on more when I get home or when I log in from another computer. I can also read my email, access my grade books (kept in Excel), read RSS feeds, print stuff out on my home printer (ready and waiting to be read when I get home), download files, and so on.

    2. Carry a notebook everywhere I go. I mentioned this before in my tips for students but it bears repeating: my Moleskine is never out of reach. For example, I had the idea for this post this afternoon between classes, and am now writing it from the outline I jotted down then. Since ideas are the lifeblood of my many roles (teacher, researcher, writer) I have to be able to capture them at a moment’s notice or risk losing them forever.
    3. Follow a morning routine. My workday starts at a different time almost every day. My partner, though, has to be at work at 8 am every morning. So I follow her routine, for two reasons: a) if I wake up at a different time every day, I’ll quickly go insane, and b) keeping on the same schedule means we get as much time together as our busy schedule allows. On days that my classes start later, I can get work done in the morning before I leave.
    4. Schedule everything. As much as possible, I try to put every significant block of time on my calendar: classes, obviously, but also writing, shopping, events, family time, house cleaning, even goofing off. Because I never know where I’ll be when I have to check my calendar, I keep my schedule on my Treo, synced with Outlook at home; I’d love to use Google Calendar or 30 Boxes, as Outlook is a little too much for what I need, but until they offer excellent Palm synchronization, I can’t consider them.
    5. Always have work with me. I never know where I’ll have downtime, and whether I’ll have access to a PC, so I always have some material to review, some grading to do, or a book to read in case an opportunity to work arises. Since I also have my Moleskine, and all my todos and notes are in there, I can also do a mini-review if I don’t have enough to fill whatever free time I have.
    6. Organize the night before. Here’s something about me: I’m an idiot in the morning. Just a big grunting blob of brainless meat. I obviously can’t trust my morning self to be on the ball, so my evening self has to take care of everything. I lay out my clothes, set up my bag, gather up whatever work I’ll want to work on the next day, put all my “pocket stuff” (keys, chapstick, wallet, etc.) next to where my Treo is charging, and so on. I do whatever I can to make the following morning totally automated; if I could get one of those Wallace and Gromit dressing machines where robot arms dress me and brush my teeth, I would.

    For all this, I admit to getting petty worn out as the week wears on. I definitely learn to cherish the rare quiet moment when I can sit and stare and not worry about anything; it passes all too quickly. My system, such as it is, is far from perfect; I’d love to hear other people’s advice on how to hold it all together when you’re constantly on the move.

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    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

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    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

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    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

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    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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