Advertising
Advertising

GiftGaff relaunches social gift registry in time for holiday sanity

GiftGaff relaunches social gift registry in time for holiday sanity

Why should we only use registries for weddings and baby showers? What about all the other holidays with presents flying ’round that always seem to end with Uncle Bobby getting 15 blue ties with little goldfish on them? GiftGaff has relaunched its holiday registry for everything from Christmas to made-up birthdays.

Advertising

    GiftGaff is simple:

    Add the new Macbook Air to your “Wishful Techie” wishlist, snoop on Jordie’s wishlist to see what not to wear, then raise your hand to buy Rosa the book she placed on her wishlist without her finding out who the present is from ahead of time.

    Advertising

    No repeat presents. No stupid presents. No embarrassment because you didn’t even snoop on your relatives’ Facebook pages to see what they might like before going shopping. Just great gifts, organized.

    Launched in 1997, after founder Erica Coffin’s grandmother received 7 copies of the same best seller for Christmas, Giftgaff.com not only tracks who has purchased gifts for whom, preventing duplicate giving, but also keeps purchased gifts a secret from the recipient, preserving the surprise.

    Advertising

    You can also create multiple wishlists with different audiences, so in addition to their own holiday or birthday wishlist, moms can create Christmas and birthday lists for babies, or for any other occasion – weddings, retirement parties, or even office Secret Santas.

    A pun on the Scottish word giff-gaff meaning “mutual giving, receiving”, GiftGaff.com is the first gifting tool to encourage users to create their own private wishlist communities, so that only the friends and family you choose share your wishlist(s). Because you know and trust the source, family and friends can to suggest gifts for each other.

    Advertising

    Check out GiftGaff (it’s Free) and let us know if you like it as well!

    More by this author

    Lifehack Digest for May 1 30sec Tip: Life Begins Where… Lifehack Digest for November 5th through November 6th Lifehack Digest for November 7th Lifehack Digest for November 9th

    Trending in Featured

    1 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 2 How to Become an Expert (And Spot out One Nearby) 3 How to Find Your Passion and Live a Fulfilling Life 4 How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Goals 5 5 Key Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

    Advertising

    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

    Advertising

    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

    Advertising

    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

    Read Next