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Genius – You Can Be One Too!

Genius – You Can Be One Too!
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When we think of a genius we think of someone who was a prodigy in their childhood and later went on to capitalize on their mental powers and make a success out of their lives, perhaps finding the cure for cancer or joining NASA to help launch man into outer space.
As a general rule these are people we hold up as an exception to the rule, a run against the norm. We believe that their incredible mental abilities have allowed them to stretch beyond the limits of normal of humanity; however, this is not the case.

Oddly enough, scientists believe that it is the physical formation of the brain that determines a person’s intelligence. A brain with a greater quantity of gray matter in the cerebral cortex, the portion of the brain which controls its higher functions (the lower portions of the brain control bodily activities, such as breathing and the pumping of the heart) will bless a person with a greater intelligence.

It is believed to be the reason that many children who possess above average intelligence come from parents who possess a great deal of intelligence; the physical structure of the brain is handed down genetically.

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Is it impossible for a person who does not have an excessive quantity of gray matter in their brain to be intelligent? Certainly not! The ability of the brain to function is based greatly on the ability of its neurons to connect with each other.

An increase in neuron connection equals an increase in brain activity, which equals an increase in the thought process and the ability of the brain to respond more quickly in certain situations.

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There are many situations that result in an inability of the neurons to connect with maximum efficiency. One of the most common is sleep deprivation, an epidemic that is sweeping across the globe as men, women and children of all ages attempt to accomplish more in a day than it was ever intended for them to do. Drug and alcohol use will also have a negative effect on the ability of the neurons to connect properly.

The good news is that everyone’s brains operate by these same fundamental principles, regardless of the amount of gray matter present. What does this mean? It means that by successfully increasing the ability of the neurons to connect anyone can increase their intelligence.

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How can one increase the connection of their neurons? By using them! The brain can continue to produce new neurons into old age; the degeneration of the mind that accompanies the golden years is generally caused by disease or disuse rather than a natural body process.

By continuing to exercise the brain through reading and academic puzzles anyone can increase and maintain their brain power, even if they aren’t your average genius.

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If you ever think that genius can only be born, you can be seriously wrong.
In 1952, an experiment was done by Aaron Stern on his daughter, Edith, which proves the world that given the right environment and strategies, a person’s intelligence can be developed and trained. Edith was truly a genius who obtained a PH. D. degree at the age of 18.

In short, Aaron Stern trained Edith from the time she was born. Playing classical music to her, using picture cards and flash cards to teach her everyday even she was only a few weeks old. At the age of 5, she had finished reading the entire encyclopedia Britannica.

The good is you can train yourself to be a genius too even though you started out late. It’s only a matter of the right strategies and methods. Start by listening to classical music on a daily basis or using Mindmaps to brain storm from ideas.

George Tee is the author of “Secrets Of Scoring ‘A’s” and founder of Learning Nest – Secretsofstudying.com . A few of his popular articles are 5 Hacks That Make Study Simple And Effective, 11 Things Students Do To Get Back At Teachers and Time Management for a Stress-Free Life

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George Tee

George is the founder of Secrets of Studying. He is devoted in sharing his secrets of learning and growing as an entrepreneur.

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Last Updated on September 10, 2019

How to Master the Art of Prioritization

How to Master the Art of Prioritization

Do you know that prioritization is an art? It is an art that will lead you to success in whatever area that matters to you.

By prioritization, I’m not talking so much about assigning tasks, but deciding which will take chronological priority in your day—figuring out which tasks you’ll do first, and which you’ll leave to last.

Effective Prioritization

There are two approaches to “prioritizing” the tasks in your to-do list that I see fairly often:

Approach #1 Tackling the Biggest Tasks First and Getting Them out of the Way

The idea is that by tackling them first, you deal with the pressure and anxiety that builds up and prevents you from getting anything done—whether we’re talking about big or small tasks. Leo Babauta is a proponent of this Big Rocks method.[1]

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Approach #2 Tackling the Tasks You Can Get Done Quickly and Easily, with Minimal Effort

Proponents of this method believe that by tackling the small fries first, you’ll have less noise distracting you from the periphery of your consciousness.

If you believe in getting your email read and responded to, making phone calls and getting Google Reader zeroed before you dive into the high-yield work, you’re a proponent of this method. I suppose you could say Getting Things Done (GTD) encourages this sort of method, since the methodology advises followers to tackle tasks that can be completed within two minutes, right there and then.

Figure out Your Approach for Prioritization

My own approach is perhaps a mixture of the two.

I’ll write out my daily task list and draw little priority stars next to the three items I need to get done that day. They don’t need to be big tasks, but nine times out of ten, they are.

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Smaller tasks are rarely important enough to warrant a star in the first place; I can always get away without even checking my inbox until the next day if I’m swamped, and the people who need to get in touch with me super quickly know how.

But I’m not recommending my system of prioritization to you. I’m also not saying that mine is better than Leo’s Big Rocks method, and I’m not saying it’s better than the “if it can be done quickly, do it first” method either.

The thing with prioritization is that knowing when to do what relies very much on you and the way you work. Some people need to get some small work done to find a sense of accomplishment and clarity that allows them to focus on and tackle bigger items. Others need to deal with the big tasks or they’ll get caught up in the busywork of the day and never move on, especially when that Google Reader count just refuses to get zeroed (personally, I recommend the Mark All As Read button—I use it most days!).

I’m in between, because my own patterns can be all over the place. Some days I will be ready to rip into massive projects at 7AM. Other times I’ll feel the need to zero every inbox I have and clean up the papers on my desk before I can focus on anything serious. I also know that my peak, efficient working time doesn’t come at 11AM or 3PM or some specific time like it does for many people, but I have several peaks divided by a few troughs. I can feel what’s coming on when and try to keep my schedule liquid enough that I can adapt.

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That’s why I use a starred task list system rather than a scheduled task list. It allows me to trust myself (something that I suppose takes a certain amount of discipline) and achieve peak efficiency by blowing with the winds. If I fight the peaks and troughs, I’ll get less done; but if I do certain kinds of work in each period of the day as they come, I’ll get more done than most others in a similar line of work.

You may not be able to trust yourself to that extent without falling into the busywork trap. You may not be able to tackle big tasks first thing in the morning without feeling like you’re pushing against an invisible brick wall that won’t budge. You might not be able to deal with small tasks before the big tasks without feeling pangs of guilt and urgency.

My point is:

The prioritization systems themselves don’t matter. They’re all pretty good for a group of people, not least of all to the people who espouse them because they use them and find them effective.

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What matters is that you don’t fall for one set of dogma (and I’m not saying Leo Babauta or David Allen preach these things as dogma, but sometimes their proponents do) until you’ve tried the systems extensively, and found which method of chronological prioritization works for you.

And if the system you already use works great, then there’s no need to bother trying others—in the world of personal productivity, it’s too easy to mess with something that works and find yourself unable to get back into your former groove.

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

In truth, this principle applies to all sorts of personal productivity issues, though it’s important to know which issues it applies to.

If you thought multitasking worked well for you each day and I’d have to contend that you are wrong—multitasking is a universal myth in my books! But if you find yourself prioritizing tasks that never get done, you might need to reconsider which of the above approaches you’re using and change to a system that is more personally effective.

More About Prioritization & Time Management

Featured photo credit: Sabri Tuzcu via unsplash.com

Reference

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