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Five Common Working-At-Home Problems- Solved!

Five Common Working-At-Home Problems- Solved!
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We’re all familiar with the advantages (sometimes idealized) of working from home. You can work in your pajamas, you have a 25-foot commute, you have increased flexibility with your personal obligations, and you get some decent tax deductions. However, there are some special considerations that may need to be addressed or accommodated to make your home office the best it can be. Here are a few things we often address with our home office clients in our work as Professional Organizers:

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Sorry, we’re closed. Because of the temptation to “always work,” the ideal workspace for better work/life balance is one where you can close the door when your working hours are over (you do have “working hours,” don’t you?). If this is not possible, another solution is to use a folding screen or room divider to create a sense of separation. We strongly discourage using your personal bedroom for your work area, as that makes the lines really blurred, and the Feng Shui people really don’t like that either, if you are into that kind of thing.

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What? I can’t hear you! Do you need to spend a lot of time on the phone with prospects or clients? You will need to make sure that unprofessional sounds (such as dogs barking and children crying) do not interfere with your ability to hear or talk on the phone. If you are discussing sensitive issues, you may not want others in your home to hear your conversations. If necessary, these noise and privacy problems can be addressed with soundproofing or white noise machines (click here for some options).

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Keep your workspace sacred. Create rules to make sure your family members respect your workspace. If possible, make sure that your family members have their own spaces to study, draw, read, and use a computer. Accidents happen—drinks can get spilled on important paperwork and other people can inadvertently infect your computer with viruses or spyware. Getting young kids an inexpensive, used, or hand-me-down computer for their games and such can be very liberating. Have duplicates of common office supplies and tools like staplers and scissors so that your workspace does not have to be disturbed, and so you won’t be left empty-handed when your family has taken them off somewhere else.

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Special delivery. Can you hear your doorbell from your office? You may need to receive visitors and accept packages during your workday. If needed, a wireless doorbell chime extender can be easily installed (available at any hardware/home center). If you need to receive packages often when you are not home, you may wish to install a large package drop mailbox, or consider renting a box at a retail mail center location that can accept packages on your behalf.

Let yourself in. For co-workers who may require entry into your home, you may find it useful to get an outdoor keypad installed for your garage door opener (if you have one). This keypad will eliminate the need for multiple people to have keys to your home (assuming that you are not locking the door on the interior of the garage into the house). If you have an alarm system, also remember that you can usually set up temporary and secondary codes to avoid giving out your master alarm code.

Lorie Marrero is a Professional Organizer and creator of The Clutter Diet, an innovative, affordable online program for home organization. Lorie’s site helps members lose “Clutter-Pounds” from their homes by providing online access to her team of organizers. Lorie writes something insanely practical every few days or so in the Clutter Diet Blog. She lives in Austin, TX, where her company has provided hands-on organizing services to clients since 2000.

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Last Updated on February 25, 2020

Face Adversity with a Smile

Face Adversity with a Smile

I told my friend Graham that I often cycle the two miles from my house to the town centre but unfortunately there is a big hill on the route. He replied, ‘You mean fortunately.’ He explained that I should be glad of the extra exercise that the hill provided.

My attitude to the hill has now changed. I used to grumble as I approached it but now I tell myself the following. This hill will exercise my heart and lungs. It will help me to lose weight and get fit. It will mean that I live longer. This hill is my friend. Finally as I wend my way up the incline I console myself with the thought of all those silly people who pay money to go to a gym and sit on stationery exercise bicycles when I can get the same value for free. I have a smug smile of satisfaction as I reach the top of the hill.

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Problems are there to be faced and overcome. We cannot achieve anything with an easy life. Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind person to gain a University degree. Her activism and writing proved inspirational. She wrote, “Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experiences of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, vision cleared, ambition inspired and success achieved.”

One of the main determinants of success in life is our attitude towards adversity. From time to time we all face hardships, problems, accidents, afflictions and difficulties. Some are of our making but many confront us through no fault of our own. Whilst we cannot choose the adversity we can choose our attitude towards it.

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Douglas Bader was 21 when in 1931 he had both legs amputated following a flying accident. He was determined to fly again and went on to become one of the leading flying aces in the Battle of Britain with 22 aerial victories over the Germans. He was an inspiration to others during the war. He said, “Don’t listen to anyone who tells you that you can’t do this or that. That’s nonsense. Make up your mind, you’ll never use crutches or a stick, then have a go at everything. Go to school, join in all the games you can. Go anywhere you want to. But never, never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.”

How can you change your attitude towards the adversity that you face? Try these steps:

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  1. Confront the problem. Do not avoid it.
  2. Deliberately take a positive attitude and write down some benefits or advantages of the situation.
  3. Visualise how you will feel when you overcome this obstacle.
  4. Develop an action plan for how to tackle it.
  5. Smile and get cracking.

The biographies of great people are littered with examples of how they took these kinds of steps to overcome the difficulties they faced. The common thread is that they did not become defeatist or depressed. They chose their attitude. They opted to be positive. They took on the challenge. They won.

Featured photo credit: Jamie Brown via unsplash.com

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